HD.1 Improve the design and quality of new housing structures

HD.1. 1 Explore design tools and update Community Design standards tailored to East Portland development styles and neighborhoods.
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HD.1. 2 Explore design requirements and/or mandatory design overlays for multi-dwelling development in high-impact infill areas.
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HD.1. 3 Explore code provisions to improve corner-lot building orientation.
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HD.1. 4 Initiate pilot projects for development of high-quality housing compatible with existing development and natural features.
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Portland Housing Bureau has provided funding to Human Solutions CDC to develop a well-designed, transit-oriented development at SE 99th and SE Glisan. Glisan Commons Phase 1 will include a mix of uses including 16,000 sq ft of ground floor office space for Ride Connection. With 127 units of affordable rental housing on the upper floors. Phase 2 of the project will be completed by REACH CDC and will be a 60 unit rental housing development for seniors.
HD.1. 5 Implement Courtyard Design Competition ideas and standards.
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Portland Housing Bureau provided financing for Pardee Commons at SE 122nd and Pardee. Completed in 2010, Pardee Commons is a for-sale, courtyard style development of ten homes priced to be affordable to households earning 80% of area median income. The car is given secondary attention while people are given the focus of the shared courtyard and common green area. The project meets the Oregon Department of Energy's High Performance Home standard, which means it uses 50% less energy than building only to code standard. Plus, it will qualify as an Earth Advantage Platinum home. Features include solar hot water; extra insulation; high efficiency heat pumps; permeable pavers on main driveway; low VOC paints; homes have smaller footprints, opening more area to green spaces; easy access to mass transit.
HD.1. 6 Explore financial incentives or other mechanisms to upgrade materials and design quality of multi-dwelling development (MFR fa?ade program).
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HD.2 Improve the appearance, quality and safety of existing housing stock

HD.2. 1 Increase proactive code enforcement for housing; improve information about reporting and mechanisms to address issues.
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From July 2013 to December 2014, the Community Alliance of Tenants worked with East Portland tenants to improve rental housing conditions and the rental-housing inspections program in East Portland. We worked with different communities of tenants to build thier leadership and address their housing needs. CAT helped tenants organize 2 buildings that had repair and maintenance issues and substandard living conditions. We knocked on 53 doors between the two buildings, gave Renters' Rights and Healthy Homes workshops to the tenants, heard what kinds of repair issues they are having, and helped the write a group letter to the landlords. We also helped the tenants call for inspections when the landlord wouldn't make the needed repairs. All repairs were eventually made. Fair housing also came up, and we supported renters in both buildings to seek legal support for fair housing education and evaluation. We supported 8 tenants leaders to study and evaluate the Portland Rental Housing Inspections program, and helped to build a campaign to advocates for improvements to the inspections program. CAT and tenant leaders monitored the inspections program, and found that inspections for East Portland residents usually happened within an average of 3-week turn around. From Jan-June 2014, tenant leaders identified what additional inspections needs would be helpful for East Portland renters. Tenant leaders identified tenant education resources, an additional inspector and continued relocation support. Tenant leaders advocated for increased code enforcement and funding for the inspection program for the City of Portland's 2014-15 budget. Tenants also advocated for a city-wide enhanced program that would include expanding the enhanced pilot to N/NE Portland in low income neighborhoods; tenant/landlord education about healthy homes interventions; better data collection about those being served by the program; and increased inspectors in East Portland to reduce the inspections turn around rate. Tenant leaders also advocated for a new pilot project that would provide comprehensive tenant education to immigrant and refugee households to support new Portlanders to understand modern apartment living in Portland- inspection program, pest/mold/sanitation prevention and best practices, and asking for repairs safely and effectively. Tenants successfully advocated for an additional inspector, letter-writing clinics, evictions, court counseling, and additional language services provided through the city. CAT volunteers worked with tenant leaders, in trainings, one-on-one, and over the phone, to educate tenants about the issues in the Portland city budget that might affect tenants, and how they can share their stories to ask for more services and programs. In all, we spoke to over 200 tenants, who signed postcards, wrote testimony, and gave oral testimony at budget hearings.
HD.2. 2 Develop a Rental Inspection Program to ensure that minimum life and health standards are maintained in multifamily housing.
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In June of 2013, the Community Alliance of Tenants and tenant leaders were successful in getting the city of Portland to convert nearly 2 million of on-time general funds into ongoing general funds for the inspections program. This conversion also included an additional inspector for the East Portland Enhanced Pilot area. In the winter of 2013-14, 8 tenant leaders joined the Community Alliance of Tenants to form a Rental Inspections Policy Workgroup, to study and evaluate the existing Portland Rental Inspections program and make comments, and develop and implement a campaign strategy that educates and activates East Portland residents, community leaders, and city officials to support changes and/or resources for an effective rental inspection program. CAT and tenant leaders monitored the inspections program, and found that inspections for East Portland residents usually happened within an average of 3-week turn around. From Jan-June, tenant leaders identified what additional inspections needs would be helpful for East Portland renters. Tenant leaders identified tenant education and translation/interpretation resources, an additional inspector, and continued relocation support. CAT staff and tenant leaders continue to engage with the Bureau of Development Services, sitting on the BDS Budget Advisory Committee, and continuing to advocate for a more equitable provision of services to East Portland tenants. This includes more language and interpretation services within BDS, since there are over 120 languages spoken in East Portland.
HD.2. 3 Create a housing rehabilitation program to improve the safety and appearance of existing housing stock.
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Portland Housing Bureau has provided Rose Community Development with $3.3 million in financing to acquire and rehabilitate 40 units of rental housing at 7901 SE 92nd Avenue. The funds will go towards completely renovating the property to improve its appearance, safety, and sustainability. It will also ensure continued affordability of the units for low income renters. The project is currently under construction.
ROSE Community Development was awarded funding for two projects from the Portland Housing Bureau's 2011 Notice of Funds Availability. A 19-apartment multi-family property on SE Raymond near 82nd Avenue will be acquired and rehabilitated. ROSE will also receive $380,000 to improve Beyer Court, which provides homes for 14 families across the street from the Wattles Boys and Girls Club at SE 92nd and Harold. ROSE acquired Beyer Court, which is named after long-time Lents Neighborhood Association activists Jim and Pat Beyer, in 1998. City funds will be used to replace the roof, siding, doors and windows.
HD.2. 4 Expand community non-profit home repair and rehabilitation assistance programs to cover greater number of households.
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Portland Housing Bureau continues to fund home repair assistance for low-income, senior homeowners through our local non-profit partners: REACH CDC, Unlimited Choices, Community Energy Project and Rebuilding Together. Contact those organizations for more information or visit http://www.portlandoregon.gov/phb/article/430363

HD.3 Improve public notification for new development and enhance community knowledge, capacity and influence

HD.3. 1 Develop a mechanism to notify school districts of residential development permits.
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HD.3. 2 Expand development regulation information in multiple languages; assist non-English speakers' understanding of the process.
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HD.3. 3 Improve outreach and involvement of East Portland residents and businesses in Portland Plan; expand capacity of EPNO land use chairs group to engage in Portland Plan.
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Encouraged use of the East Portland Action Plan (recently completed) to guide Portland Plan policies for East Portland. ONI has organized two ABC's of Land Use workshops in outer East since 2009. East Portland Action Plan has advocated with the Bureau of Planning and Sustainability District Liaison to develop a spread sheet that informs where each Action item is addressed in the Portland Plan, which Policy Expert Group is most appropriate to address each Action item, and where the Action item would best be addressed in the Comprehensive Plan. This document is in process, but has received initial draft review. East Portland Action Plan Housing Subcommittee has been actively advocating to advance systemic address of this Action item. The EPAP made this Action item one of their priorities for 2012 -13.
HD.3. 4 Develop classes to improve technical capacity and expertise in land use for/among neighborhood leaders.
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HD.3. 5 Consider and develop a mechanism to provide better notification to neighbors of multi-dwelling developments that do not require a land use review.
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HD.4 Review and assess public policies and incentives for housing development

HD.4. 1 Explore policies and mechanisms to address timing and funding of services when development occurs (including schools, parks, streets, etc).
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DCHS Housing Team staff are working closely with jurisdictional funders, including PDC, the Housing Authority of Portland, the Cities of Gresham and Portland and the State of Oregon to match up housing and services in publicly funded new construction or rehabilitation projects. In the last 2 years we have added two new affordable housing complexes to East County, Broadway Vantage and Eastgate Station. In addition to serving low-income households, both projects also serve high-resource using homeless families in the Bridges to Housing Program. The Eastgate Station also serves clients in our Aging and Developmental Disabilities programs with a focus on placing low-income seniors & people with disabilities transitioning from nursing facilities into affordable & accessible independent housing.
HD.4. 2 Align development standards and policies among bureaus to improve coordination and resolve internal conflicts.
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HD.4. 3 Review and assess housing development tax abatement benefits and impacts in East Portland; consider adjustments as warranted.
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To: The East Portland Action Plan From: EPAP Housing Subcommittee Date: 3/27/13 RE: Research on the Question: Does East Portland have more Tax Exempt Property due to Affordable Housing than other areas in Portland? The EPAP Housing Subcommittee finding is: No, it does not. The number of affordable housing tax exemptions is slightly higher than the city average, but not unreasonably so. Background: From its inception, EPAP members have raised concerns about a concentration of tax-exempt properties in East Portland, particularly about the tax exemption for affordable housing. Tax exemptions are perceived to reduce funding for local governments and school districts. New affordable housing is perceived to increase enrollment at already crowded public schools and increase the concentration of poverty in East Portland. The EPAP Housing Subcommittee decided to research this question to determine its validity and resolve an Action Item: HD.4.3 Review and assess housing development tax abatement benefits and impacts in East Portland; consider adjustments as warranted. Procedure: In the early fall of 2012, Frieda Christopher obtained and analyzed data on Property Tax Exemption from Multnomah County. David Hampsten assisted with the analysis. Chris Scarzello provided additional data from the Bureau of Planning and Sustainability. The Multnomah County Tax Collector provided the data in both situations for the 2012/13-tax year. After discussion with the Housing Subcommittee, Chris Scarzello sent this analysis to Uma Krishnan at the Portland Bureau Planning and Sustainability for additional input. In December 2012, Nick Sauvie drafted the initial report and provided recommendations. The EPAP Housing Subcommittee adopted its final report and recommendations at its meeting on 3/11/13. The results of this process are shown below: 1.East Portland contains about 25% of the city’s population and it has about 25% of the city’s affordable housing tax-exempt properties. A review of the Percentage of Properties with Tax Exemption shows that the East Portland percentage (7.3%) is higher than the City of Portland percentage of 6.1%. However, other areas of Portland have even higher percentages of exemption. The percentage for North Portland is 9.7%. Percent of Properties with Affordable Housing Tax Exemptions 7.3% East Portland 6.1% City Average 1.7% Low (Central City) 9.7% High (North) 2.Similarly, when the total of all tax exemptions (exemptions for housing, hospitals, schools, religious groups, etc.) is added together, there is a slightly higher percentage in East Portland (12.9%) than for the city as a whole (12.4%). When all exemptions are combined, the area of Portland with the highest percentage of exemptions is the Central City area with 26.4%. Percent of Properties with Tax Exemptions of Any Kind 12.9% East Portland 12.4% City Average 9.9% Low (Southeast) 26.4% High (Central City) 3.The data reviewed showed that the total affordable housing tax exemptions for the city of Portland is $36.7 million per year, which is about 3.7% of total tax collections for the Portland area (City + School Districts + County). The total Property Tax collected for the area of the Portland city is $999 million. The EPAP Housing Subcommittee believes that exempting 3.7%, when compared to the total property tax collected, is a reasonable amount since it is exempted to provide housing for thousands of Portland’s most vulnerable residents, many of whom are elderly, disabled or children. Tax Inequality: An additional finding of this property tax analysis was that East Portland property tax payers often pay a higher amount of taxes for similar properties than are paid in other areas of Portland. This is clearly a property tax inequity for East Portland, which relates to two other Action Items: EQ.1.1 Initiate a citywide audit of resource allotment - research tax equity and contributions of East Portland to the tax base. EQ.1.2 Initiate county audit of resource allotment in East Portland - tax contribution/use and service needs alignment. Data from the Multnomah County Tax Assessor on properties in the City of Portland demonstrate the unintended consequences of property tax limitation measures as approved by the voters in the 1990s. There is a wide disparity between property taxes paid on different properties of similar value in East Portland when compared to other areas of the City. As a result, the taxes paid on a typical property worth $200,000 in East Portland might be $1,000 more per year than those on a similarly valued property in the Central City or another area of the City. City Commissioner Steve Novick and the League of Oregon Cities have each proposed solutions to make the state’s property tax system more equitable. Commissioner Novick’s commentary can be read at http://www.portlandoregon.gov/novick/article/428020. One of the reasons for East Portland paying more than its fair share of property taxes may be the large number of tax-exempt properties in the Central City area of Portland. More than one out of every four Central City properties – 26.4% – is tax exempt. Despite this large number of exempt properties, the Central City has by far the lowest percentage of affordable housing tax-exempt properties – only 1.7%. Final Conclusions: The EPAP Housing Subcommittee does not find there to be significant differences in the amount of tax exempt property for affordable housing in East Portland when compared to other areas of the City of Portland. The belief that East Portland has more property tax exemptions because of its affordable housing is an urban myth. The misperception of East Portland having more property tax exemptions for affordable housing may result from the fact that East Portland has a higher percentage of affordable housing, although much of it is not property tax exempt. Housing which is built intentionally to be affordable by Community Development Corporations is very likely to be property tax exempt. However, housing built by the Private Sector often becomes affordable because the properties are not well maintained and deteriorate over time making it more difficult to command higher rents. Consequently, the housing becomes affordable to lower income residents and less desirable to those with higher incomes. It is not affordable by design---it is affordable by accident. This type of accidentally affordable housing is generally not property tax exempt. The EPAP Housing Subcommittee supports good, affordable housing by design. Building well-designed new housing and rehabilitating existing housing supports strong East Portland neighborhoods. The affordable housing tax exemption is an important tool that benefits families, seniors and people with disabilities.

HD.5 Improve regulations and implementation of City code to increase benefit and reduce impacts

HD.5. 1 Explore mechanisms to provide on-site play areas and open space in multifamily housing developments.
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HD.5. 2 Amend zoning code to improve flag lot development and privacy issues.
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HD.5. 3 Improve/institute a tree preservation and replacement code.
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HD.5. 4 Review relationship of zoning density and lot size to address East Portland infill context.
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HD.5. 5 Develop better guidelines and regulations for transitions between relatively high and moderate intensity zones to mitigate decreased sunlight access and privacy impacts.
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HD.5. 6 Provide community amenities and improve design to encourage housing that is attractive to households with a range of incomes.
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In June 2012, PBOT applied for an ODOT TGM Grant to do the Division-Midway Neighborhood Street Plan project. The purpose of the Division-Midway Neighborhood Street Plan is to foster safe and convenient access to commercial destinations along SE Division Street from surrounding neighborhoods by identifying new local street connections and a primary network of walking and bicycling routes at a neighborhood-level (which will feed into the citywide active transportation network). This project will advance objectives identified in the East Portland Action Plan (2009) and Portland Plan (2012) to improve infrastructure, create a healthier environment and expand commercial services so residents can meet their daily needs in close proximity to home. This project will also build upon past transportation planning efforts, including the Far SE Master Street Plan (2001), SE 122nd Avenue Study (2011), Outer Powell Boulevard Conceptual Design Plan (2011-12), and East Portland in Motion (2011). The Division-Midway Neighborhood Street Plan will focus on the neighborhoods served by businesses within the Division-Midway Neighborhood Prosperity Initiative (NPI) district, one of six recently formed urban renewal areas aimed at strengthening the economic competitiveness of neighborhood business districts through community-planned and community-implemented actions and projects. The boundary would reach from SE 112th to SE 148th and extend roughly one mile north to SE Stark (serving the Rosewood NPI) and south to SE Holgate. The study area covers four neighborhoods (Powellhurst Gilbert, Hazelwood, Mill Park, and Centennial) and two business associations (Gateway Area BA and Midway BA). The neighborhoods in the study area have unique street patterns and severe deficiencies in transportation infrastructure, including numerous unpaved and dead-end streets. Much of the area developed as low-density suburban areas that were subsequently annexed into the City of Portland in 1980s and 90s. As a result, street connections were not planned to meet spacing standards and basic roadway infrastructure (such as pavement and/or sidewalks) was often not built at the time of development. Expected Outcomes: • Develop a refined street plan for the study area by identifying opportunities for future full-street and pedestrian-bicycle connections • Evaluate neighborhood streets (i.e. traffic classification of neighborhood collector or local service) by compiling traffic data and determining their functions (current and future) for motor vehicles, pedestrians and bicycles • Identify primary walking and bicycling routes to SE Division Street, schools, parks and other local destinations based on adopted plans, traffic conditions and community input • Distinguish between streets with varying traffic functions and consider changes to street classifications or defining a street typology • Develop a set of local street improvement options at a concept level and determine the streets where each option can be applied • Establish an implementation strategy outlining priority street improvement projects and the process for making local improvements Estimated Proposed Project Budget: $125,000 Project Contact: Denver Igarta, Transportation Planner, (503) 823-1088, Denver.Igarta@portlandoregon.gov Portland Bureau of Transportation, 1120 SW 5th Ave, Suite 800, Portland, Oregon 97204

HD.6 Review and assess Comprehensive Plan Map and implementation in East Portland

HD.6. 1 Assess outcomes of the Outer Southeast Community Plan, update where needed.
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HD.6. 2 Evaluate location and intensity of current residential zoning including density bonuses.
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HD.6. 3 Initiate a pilot project in East Portland to test new land use concepts: consider land development, transportation and connectivity, services.
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In June 2012, PBOT applied for an ODOT TGM Grant to do the Division-Midway Neighborhood Street Plan project. The purpose of the Division-Midway Neighborhood Street Plan is to foster safe and convenient access to commercial destinations along SE Division Street from surrounding neighborhoods by identifying new local street connections and a primary network of walking and bicycling routes at a neighborhood-level (which will feed into the citywide active transportation network). This project will advance objectives identified in the East Portland Action Plan (2009) and Portland Plan (2012) to improve infrastructure, create a healthier environment and expand commercial services so residents can meet their daily needs in close proximity to home. This project will also build upon past transportation planning efforts, including the Far SE Master Street Plan (2001), SE 122nd Avenue Study (2011), Outer Powell Boulevard Conceptual Design Plan (2011-12), and East Portland in Motion (2011). The Division-Midway Neighborhood Street Plan will focus on the neighborhoods served by businesses within the Division-Midway Neighborhood Prosperity Initiative (NPI) district, one of six recently formed urban renewal areas aimed at strengthening the economic competitiveness of neighborhood business districts through community-planned and community-implemented actions and projects. The boundary would reach from SE 112th to SE 148th and extend roughly one mile north to SE Stark (serving the Rosewood NPI) and south to SE Holgate. The study area covers four neighborhoods (Powellhurst Gilbert, Hazelwood, Mill Park, and Centennial) and two business associations (Gateway Area BA and Midway BA). The neighborhoods in the study area have unique street patterns and severe deficiencies in transportation infrastructure, including numerous unpaved and dead-end streets. Much of the area developed as low-density suburban areas that were subsequently annexed into the City of Portland in 1980s and 90s. As a result, street connections were not planned to meet spacing standards and basic roadway infrastructure (such as pavement and/or sidewalks) was often not built at the time of development. Expected Outcomes: • Develop a refined street plan for the study area by identifying opportunities for future full-street and pedestrian-bicycle connections • Evaluate neighborhood streets (i.e. traffic classification of neighborhood collector or local service) by compiling traffic data and determining their functions (current and future) for motor vehicles, pedestrians and bicycles • Identify primary walking and bicycling routes to SE Division Street, schools, parks and other local destinations based on adopted plans, traffic conditions and community input • Distinguish between streets with varying traffic functions and consider changes to street classifications or defining a street typology • Develop a set of local street improvement options at a concept level and determine the streets where each option can be applied • Establish an implementation strategy outlining priority street improvement projects and the process for making local improvements Estimated Proposed Project Budget: $125,000 Project Contact: Denver Igarta, Transportation Planner, (503) 823-1088, Denver.Igarta@portlandoregon.gov Portland Bureau of Transportation, 1120 SW 5th Ave, Suite 800, Portland, Oregon 97204
HD.6. 4 Engage school districts in long range planning for land use and service provision.
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