T.1 Improve transit service throughout East Portland

T.1. 1 Develop prioritized list for improvements to existing transit stops.
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Organized bus riders to begin identifying and assessing transit stop amenities in East Portland; Obtained grant funding to study and prioritize improvements to stops over two year period (2011-13)
On April 18th, 2012, the Portland City Council adopted the East Portland In Motion (EPIM) study, which was put together by PBOT, with the assistance of EPAPbike, the East Portland Land Use & Transportation Committee, and numerous volunteers and stakeholders. The EPIM identifies firm funding for over $25 million in new transportation projects in East Portland for the next five years, including 6 miles of new sidewalks and 35 miles of new bike facilities, as well as bike parking, pedestrian islands, and road rebuilds for parts of Powell Blvd & Sandy Blvd. Study identified and funds many new pedestrian crossings and infill sidewalks along major transit streets, including Stark, Glisan, 122nd, Division, Holgate, & SE 136th, as well as funds bus shelters along Division, and bike & ride facilities at the Gateway TC, Holgate MAX station, & Division MAX station. 2012-14
Trimet has announced an East Portland/East County transit study for January 2013 through December 2013, from 82nd to 223rd, including N-S bus connections, transit stops & facilities, MAX connections & improvements, and access to transit improvements.
According to Steve Kautz of TriMet, speaking at an EPAP TAC meeting on August 22nd, 2012Trimet's Eastside Enhancement Plan, an transit alternatives analysis, will begin in January 2013 (though December 2013), and is intended to go from 82nd to the east METRO communities. The METRO East Metro Connections Plan will be referenced. They will be looking with a fresh eye to how to use current resources more efficiently and the most useful & productive improvements. The goal is to establish near- and far-term priorities. The Plan is to be done in the context of the Tri-Met financial base inventory and how to build into capitol improvements, as well as how to get to and from bus stops.
East Portland Action Plan has establised a Transit Rider Subcommittee and has provided OPAL with two grants to organize East Portland transit users to advocate for the transit needs of the area. EPAP granted funds to OPAL to develop assessment tool and assess transit stops and submitted a letter of support for grant from METRO to address this issue. The grant was funded. Transit service needs were established as a priority criteria when EPAP members initiated and built partnership with the East Portland Land Use and Transportation Committee to inform the Bureau of Transportation's development of a prioritized list of transportaion improvement projects now compiled in the East Portland In Motion document. EPAP successfully advocated to have this document adopted instead of accepted by City Council. EPAP coordinated the effort to establish a prioritized list using this criteria from Neighborhood Associations and School Districts. EPAP organized input to Tri-Met when they were assissing service cuts. EPAP members testified before the Tri-Met board on transit service issues. Through the EPAP Technical Advisory Committee, inter-jurdisdictional communication was facilitated that informed Tri-Met decision making. EPAP advocacy with the Bureau of Transportation made sure that transit needs were addressed in applications made for Regional Transportation and Metro Trasprotation funds. Both projects were successful in getting funding. Assessments were completed for SE Division and additional assessments are in process.
OPAL and Bus Riders Unite membership assessed over 100 bus stops in East Portland and in May 2013 prioritized the top three stops for improvement. After testifying to the TriMet board and communicating with staff about the community priorities, TriMet has made improvements to those three stops, at 82nd/Foster, 122nd/Powell and 127th/Powell.
T.1. 2 Study potential to increase north-south lines and improve frequency of transit service to serve far East Portland neighborhoods.
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Trimet has announced an East Portland/East County transit study for January 2013 through December 2013, from 82nd to 223rd, including N-S bus connections, transit stops & facilities, MAX connections & improvements, and access to transit improvements.
According to Steve Kautz of TriMet, speaking at an EPAP TAC meeting on August 22nd, 2012Trimet's Eastside Enhancement Plan, an transit alternatives analysis, will begin in January 2013 (though December 2013), and is intended to go from 82nd to the east METRO communities. The METRO East Metro Connections Plan will be referenced. They will be looking with a fresh eye to how to use current resources more efficiently and the most useful & productive improvements. The goal is to establish near- and far-term priorities. The Plan is to be done in the context of the Tri-Met financial base inventory and how to build into capitol improvements, as well as how to get to and from bus stops.
OPAL worked with Youth transit riders who have identified priorities around increased north-south connectivity and connections with bus line #4 (Division), the only frequent service bus line in East Portland. Bus line #71, one of the workhorses of the entire TriMet system, has been mentioned at numerous TriMet board meetings, including most recently the December 2014 board meeting, as having great potential for increased frequency.
T.1. 3 Explore opportunities for expanded transit service and improved connections between East Portland neighborhoods and Columbia Corridor employment areas.
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Trimet has announced an East Portland/East County transit study for January 2013 through December 2013, from 82nd to 223rd, including N-S bus connections, transit stops & facilities, MAX connections & improvements, and access to transit improvements.
According to Steve Kautz of TriMet, speaking at an EPAP TAC meeting on August 22nd, 2012Trimet's Eastside Enhancement Plan, an transit alternatives analysis, will begin in January 2013 (though December 2013), and is intended to go from 82nd to the east METRO communities. The METRO East Metro Connections Plan will be referenced. They will be looking with a fresh eye to how to use current resources more efficiently and the most useful & productive improvements. The goal is to establish near- and far-term priorities. The Plan is to be done in the context of the Tri-Met financial base inventory and how to build into capitol improvements, as well as how to get to and from bus stops.
T.1. 4 Study transit service demand in the Foster/Jenne Road/Pleasant Valley area; plan and implement accordingly.
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Trimet has announced an East Portland/East County transit study for January 2013 through December 2013, from 82nd to 223rd, including N-S bus connections, transit stops & facilities, MAX connections & improvements, and access to transit improvements.
According to Steve Kautz of TriMet, speaking at an EPAP TAC meeting on August 22nd, 2012Trimet's Eastside Enhancement Plan, an transit alternatives analysis, will begin in January 2013 (though December 2013), and is intended to go from 82nd to the east METRO communities. The METRO East Metro Connections Plan will be referenced. They will be looking with a fresh eye to how to use current resources more efficiently and the most useful & productive improvements. The goal is to establish near- and far-term priorities. The Plan is to be done in the context of the Tri-Met financial base inventory and how to build into capitol improvements, as well as how to get to and from bus stops.
T.1. 5 Evaluate utilization/capacity and management of park-and-ride facilities along MAX Green Line 12 months after opening; plan and implement changes accordingly.
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One year after then opening of the five park and ride lots connected with Green Line I-205 stations we find usage has risen dramatically from a very dismal start. As seen in the table, below, there is reason to believe this may be happening at the expense of some other stations along the East Blue Line. Eastside MAX Use % Change 2009-2010 Cleveland Avenue 68% -12% Gresham Garage 20% -15% Gresham City Hall 58% 12% 181st Avenue/Rockwood 6% -38% 122nd/Menlo Park 22% -7% Gateway 99% 1% Parkrose 95% -2% Total spaces (3091) 53% -3% Green Line I-205 Main St 16% 250% Powell 8% 200% Holgate 72% 137% Fuller Rd 11% 40% Clackamas TC 41% 29% Total spaces (2302) 25% 59%
T.1. 6 Implement a pilot project for controlled-access MAX platforms along the Blue Line.
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Maxaction is working with Trimet to develop an Adopt a Station program that will be piloted in East Portland and then span out city wide.
Neighbors and I contacted TriMet, ODOT, and PBOT to ask that "No Parking" signs be put up at the bus stop on the corner of SE 125th Pl. and Powell Blvd. going East. The reason for this was that cars were parking in the zone that the TriMet bus uses to pick up and leave riders. This zone is also used by the David Douglas School district buses to pick up students. Passengers and students were having to board/deboard in the middle of the street. ODOT responded and signs were put up by October, 2014 assuring the safety of all bus riders.
T.1. 7 Expand City of Portland and TriMet partnership linking sidewalk improvements with transit stop improvements.
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Oregon Public Health Institute (OPHI) recently received a 2-year grant from the Kaiser Permanente Community Fund and Northwest Health Foundation to improve pedestrian network connectivity in East Portland by working with the Willamette Pedestrian Coalition (WPC), Organizing People Activating Leaders (OPAL), East Portland community members, and public agencies to develop policies, plans, and practices that will more effectively produce improvements in East Portland's pedestrian networks where pedestrians most need them, including transit stop areas.
TriMet recently conducted a study of the condition of the pedestrian network supporting our transit facilities region-wide. Some of the findings regarding East Portland are that while employment and population densities are higher in some areas of the city, there are employment areas and higher housing densities along transit and especially frequent transit lines. Also, street connectivity (thus influencing the ped environment) is significantly worse east of I-205 than in other parts of the city. Barriers to ped access to transit include lack of sidewalk connectivity and higher posted speed limits, making it more difficult for many people to walk to and from transit stops. Many factors were considered for identifying priority areas for attention to pedestrian improvements; these include concentrations of destinations like schools, stores, and community centers, absence of sidewalks, and opportunity sites such as urban renewal areas for which funding might be found. Based on these factors three streets rose to the top in East Portland as high activity need/opportunity streets. 1)SE Foster Rd. 2)SE/NE 82nd Ave 3)SE/NE 122nd Ave Key intersections for further investigation include SE 82nd & Powell and SE 122nd & Division. The intent is to use these findings to work with partners to prioritize places for pedestrian infrastructure investments and help seek funding for changes to the built environment that will make these streets safer, and more desirable to walk and take transit.
On April 18th, 2012, the Portland City Council adopted the East Portland In Motion (EPIM) study, which was put together by PBOT, with the assistance of EPAPbike, the East Portland Land Use & Transportation Committee, and numerous volunteers and stakeholders. The EPIM identifies firm funding for over $25 million in new transportation projects in East Portland for the next five years, including 6 miles of new sidewalks and 35 miles of new bike facilities, as well as bike parking, pedestrian islands, and road rebuilds for parts of Powell Blvd & Sandy Blvd. Many of the improvements were linked with transit use along corridors.

T.2 Increase safety and convenience of walking throughout east Portland

T.2. 1 Prioritize East Portland schools for Safe Routes to School sidewalk and crossing improvements. (see T.7.1)
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I’m pleased to report that the Transportation Enhancement application Safe Routes to School submitted to ODOT has been funded. This project will build sidewalks and related traffic safety improvements on the south side of SE Ramona from 122nd to 136th and on the north side of SE Holgate from 122nd to 130th. In addition to providing service to the Powellhurst-Gilbert neighborhood, these projects will help the roughly 2000 students attending Alice Ott, Gilbert Park and Gilbert Heights get to and from school more safely and conveniently.
Portland Bureau of Transportation’s Safe Routes team developed an equity based metric to determine which schools should be the focus of new infrastructure grant applications. This has resulted in our two most recent infrastructure grants both having an East Portland focus. On April 22, 2011, PBOT was awarded $500,000 for pedestrian improvements at four schools – including three in East Portland – through ODOT’s Safe Routes to School 2012 Infrastructure Program. PBOT dedicated additional funds from Oregon House Bill 2001 for these projects. The East Portland schools are: • Kelly K-5 School (PPS) • Lent K-8 School (PPS) • Prescott Elementary School (Parkrose SD) PBOT is also in the final round of consideration for ODOT’s Transportation Enhancement (TE) fund for $1.5 million for sidewalk infill and related improvements at three David Douglas schools: • Alice Ott Middle School • Gilbert Heights Elementary School • Gilbert Park Elementary School PBOT expects to hear back in May 2011. Finally, projects were recently completed at Kelly (PPS), Gilbert Heights (David Douglas) and Sacramento (Parkrose) schools, funded with an earlier (2007) $500,000 award from the ODOT Safe Routes Infrastructure Program.
Oliver and Parklane Elementary were awarded grant funds from East Portland Action Plan to work with the City of Portland's Active Transportation department and Safe Routes to School to create safe walking and biking area in their neighborhood. The elementary schools were awarded funding for a Continuing Services Plan which includes an Engineering Strategies report. Community input was gathered through "Movie in the Park" events, Back to School Nights, PTOs, and neighborhood associations, more than 800 community members, to identify dangerous places and obstacles in the walking or biking.
T.2. 2 Study, identify and scope funding for pedestrian crossing safety improvements on Glisan, Halsey, Stark, Division, 122nd, and Foster.
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The recently approved Complete and Green Street grant for SE 122nd includes pedestrian crossings at both SE Raymond and SE Schiller to improve access to Raymond Park.
On April 18th, 2012, the Portland City Council adopted the East Portland In Motion (EPIM) study, which was put together by PBOT, with the assistance of EPAPbike, the East Portland Land Use & Transportation Committee, and numerous volunteers and stakeholders. The EPIM identifies firm funding for over $25 million in new transportation projects in East Portland for the next five years, including 6 miles of new sidewalks and 35 miles of new bike facilities, as well as bike parking, pedestrian islands, and road rebuilds for parts of Powell Blvd & Sandy Blvd.
T.2. 3 Review policies and procedures to ensure pedestrian improvements concurrent with all new development.
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Oregon Public Health Institute (OPHI) recently received a 2-year grant from the Kaiser Permanente Community Fund and Northwest Health Foundation to improve pedestrian network connectivity in East Portland by working with the Willamette Pedestrian Coalition (WPC), Organizing People Activating Leaders (OPAL), East Portland community members, and public agencies to develop policies, plans, and practices that will more effectively produce improvements in East Portland's pedestrian networks where pedestrians most need them.
T.2. 4 Review policy: prioritize adding sidewalk connections over expanding/widening existing connections.
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Oregon Public Health Institute (OPHI) recently received a 2-year grant from the Kaiser Permanente Community Fund and Northwest Health Foundation to improve pedestrian network connectivity in East Portland by working with the Willamette Pedestrian Coalition (WPC), Organizing People Activating Leaders (OPAL), East Portland community members, and public agencies to develop policies, plans, and practices that will more effectively produce improvements in East Portland's pedestrian networks where pedestrians most need them, including transit stop areas.
On April 18th, 2012, the Portland City Council adopted the East Portland In Motion (EPIM) study, which was put together by PBOT, with the assistance of EPAPbike, the East Portland Land Use & Transportation Committee, and numerous volunteers and stakeholders. The EPIM identifies firm funding for over $25 million in new transportation projects in East Portland for the next five years, including 6 miles of new sidewalks and 35 miles of new bike facilities, as well as bike parking, pedestrian islands, and road rebuilds for parts of Powell Blvd & Sandy Blvd.
T.2. 5 Improve landscaping, cleanliness, and patrolling of multi-use paths and neighborhood pedestrian paths.
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Oregon Department of Transportation (ODOT) in collaboration with Friends of Trees acquired a 3 year grant in the amount of $410,000 funded by Metro Nature in Neighborhoods Capital Grant Program. The project will plant thousands of trees and shrubs along the path in ODOT right-of-way from Marine Drive South to the City of Gladstone and will be touted as a statewide model for how to green ODOT right-of-way. In the first year, Winter 2009 to Spring of 2010, there were: 7 plantings # of trees planted along the path this season: 1,570 # of shrubs / smaller stock trees planted along the path this season: 835 Total # of plants: 2,405 # of volunteers from this past season: 420 # of volunteer hours: 1,684
Oregon Department of Transportation (ODOT) participated in nearly all of the bike rides that Portland Bureau of Transportation organized that included routes on the I-205 Multi-Use Path. ODOT staff talked about the ODOT/Friends of Trees Inititiave and pointed out tree and shrub plantings. Friends of Trees also led a bike ride along the I-205 Multi-Use Path as part of Pedalpalooza to highlight and discuss the tree and shrub plantings and the tree species.
New and updated first year plantings statistics from ODOT/Friends of Trees I-205 Multi-Use Path Greening Effort: -Held 7 plantings -Planted 1,570 trees along with 835 shrubs/smaller stock trees for a total of 2,405 total plants put in ground -Recruited a total of 435 volunteers who helped with plantings for total of 1,754.50 volunteer hours with an estimated cash value of $34,230.00 -Leveraged cash match from private sector businesses, nurseries, foundations, public sector agencies and others in the amount of $484,659.13 -Generated 16 green jobs for minority at-risk youth with Portland Opportunities Industrialization Council and financial support from PDC -Generated green jobs for mainly disadvantaged folks of color who are enrolled in a non-profit organization called Verde - in their environmental job training, employment, and entrepreneurial programs to provide tree and plant establishment (watering) for the I-205 Multi-Use Path greening initiative
In April of 2011, the Portland City Council adopted an Intergovernmental Agreement between the City, ODOT and PDC to make improvements to NE 97th Avenue. As part of this project, ODOT is contributing $50,000 toward improving the I-205 Multi-Use Path in this section between Burnside and Glisan in particular to improve drainage.
ODOT and Friends of Trees in the Spring of 2011 were the recipients of two awards for the I-205 Multi-Use Path: A New Forest Grows initiative where we are adding thousands of trees and shrubs over a 3 year period along the 205 path with support from Metro's Nature in Neighborhoods Capital Grant program and volunteers and partners. The 2 awards were: Women Transportation Seminar Diversity Award and Oregon Community Trees - a statewide Government award!
This just in - stats from Year 3 of I-205 Multi-Use Path, A New Forest Grows Initiative. ODOT and Friends of Trees with help from Metro Nature in Neigborhoods Capital Grant Program funding held 7 total events over the last year with help from 566 Volunteers who provided 2,294.75 volunteer hours and helped place 1,154 trees and shrubs into the ground along the I-205 Multi-Use path! Additionally 14 paid temporary, green jobs (8 POIC youth + 6 Verde Watering Crew & planting/mulching assistance during planting season)were made possible over the last year! Thank you!

T.3 Increase safety and accessibility of bicycling in East Portland

T.3. 1 Install striped bike lanes on all major arterials throughout East Portland; prioritize areas with gaps in the bike network.
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A striped buffered bike lane has been installed on SE Holgate between I-205 and SE 122nd.
On April 18th, 2012, the Portland City Council adopted the East Portland In Motion (EPIM) study, which was put together by PBOT, with the assistance of EPAPbike, the East Portland Land Use & Transportation Committee, and numerous volunteers and stakeholders. The EPIM identifies firm funding for over $25 million in new transportation projects in East Portland for the next five years, including 6 miles of new sidewalks and 35 miles of new bike facilities, as well as bike parking, pedestrian islands, and road rebuilds for parts of Powell Blvd & Sandy Blvd. Buffered bike lanes will be added to SE Division Street, 82nd to 122nd, 148th to 174th. and NE Glisan, 148th to 162nd, and parts of 122nd. Bike lanes on SE 102nd/Cherry Blossom/112th from Burnside to Holgate.
T.3. 2 Increase street sweeping on arterials with bike lanes and paths.
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T.3. 3 Develop complete and more well-defined bike system plan for East Portland; consider/incorporate safety innovations such as divided bike lanes, "bike boxes", path systems.
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EPAPbike has had three public meetings with Greg Raisman & Ellen Vanderslice of PBOT Traffic Safety group, about creating an East Portland Bicycle Master Plan, as mandated by City Council when they passed the Portland Bicycle Master Plan 2030. Greg & Ellen have put forth a framework of creating 5-6 miles per year of new neighborhood greenways (what used to be called bicycle boulevards) over the next 4-5 years, as well as filling in bike lane gaps and eventually connecting the current I-84 MUP with the projected Sullivan's Gulch MUP. An expensive bike/ped bridge over or under I-84 is likely needed to connect Argay & Parkrose with the rest of East Portland. The East Portland Bicycle Master Plan must be submitted to City Council by June 30, 2011. The meetings are every third Thursday at Muchas Gracias, 1307 NE 102nd Ave, at 6:30 PM.
On April 18th, 2012, the Portland City Council adopted the East Portland In Motion (EPIM) study, which was put together by PBOT, with the assistance of EPAPbike, the East Portland Land Use & Transportation Committee, and numerous volunteers and stakeholders. The EPIM identifies firm funding for over $25 million in new transportation projects in East Portland for the next five years, including 6 miles of new sidewalks and 35 miles of new bike facilities, as well as bike parking, pedestrian islands, and road rebuilds for parts of Powell Blvd & Sandy Blvd. Bike boulevards / Community Greenways to be implemented on: SE Bush, 104th to 130th; SE 104th/101st, Bush to Springwater, 2011/12 80s 2011/12 SE Market/Mill/Millmain/Main (4M) in 2012 SE/NE 130s in 2013/2014 NE Pacific/Oregon, Gateway TC to 132nd, 2013/14 NE Bell/Tillamook, 2014/15 NE/SE 150s in 2015/16 Also improvements to Sullivan's Gulch 2015, Parkrose bridge 2015
T.3. 4 Improve and promote Springwater Corridor trail as commuting route; consider adding trailheads/parking.
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On April 18th, 2012, the Portland City Council adopted the East Portland In Motion (EPIM) study, which was put together by PBOT, with the assistance of EPAPbike, the East Portland Land Use & Transportation Committee, and numerous volunteers and stakeholders. The EPIM identifies firm funding for over $25 million in new transportation projects in East Portland for the next five years, including 6 miles of new sidewalks and 35 miles of new bike facilities, as well as bike parking, pedestrian islands, and road rebuilds for parts of Powell Blvd & Sandy Blvd. Crossing improvement at 136th (2013) Also, Parks Bureau rebuilt path in 2010/11
T.3. 5 Provide bike outreach info with East Portland focus.
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Oregon Department of Transportation (ODOT) in collaboration with sponsors and partners including East Portland Action Plan, Bicyclists of Color, Audubon Society of Portland, Community Cycling Center, Portland Bureau of Transportation and Friends of Trees and TriMet planned the first annual Equity Ride which began at IRCO and included a stop at PCC (at 82nd/Division) and a stop along the I-205 Multi-Use path. There were about 70 folks on the ride and 35 to 40 of the riders were people of color. The purpose of the ride was to focus on and talk about racial, geographic, economic and environmental equity efforts.
On April 18th, 2012, the Portland City Council adopted the East Portland In Motion (EPIM) study, which was put together by PBOT, with the assistance of EPAPbike, the East Portland Land Use & Transportation Committee, and numerous volunteers and stakeholders. The EPIM identifies firm funding for over $25 million in new transportation projects in East Portland for the next five years, including 6 miles of new sidewalks and 35 miles of new bike facilities, as well as bike parking, pedestrian islands, and road rebuilds for parts of Powell Blvd & Sandy Blvd. PBOT Smart Trips in 2010 from 72nd to 122nd PBOT EPIM outreach to EPAPbike 2010-12 PBOT Smart Trips returns 2014/5, 122nd to City Boundary
Oliver and Parklane Elementary were awarded grant funds from East Portland Action Plan to work with the City of Portland's Active Transportation department and Safe Routes to School to create safe walking and biking area in their neighborhood. The elementary schools were awarded funding for a Continuing Services Plan which includes an Engineering Strategies report. Part of this report will include a Family Friendly map that illustrates the bike paths and greenways in the neighborhood. During the Community meeting walk around, Carolina Iraheta Gonzalez, Safe Routes to School Organizer, discussed ideas and suggestions for bike trains and walking school buses within the neighborhood. She will also be in attendance during the next meeting where the community will prioritize street improvement projects to create more interest and organizing around safe routes.
The Bicycle Transportation Alliance and EPAP Bike hosted a Policy Ride in East Portland June 2015. About 35 Policy makers, advocates and community leaders converged on the streets of East Portland to explore and discuss priority projects that will improve biking and walking conditions in the area. Highlights of the 9-mile bike ride included discussions on Metro’s Powell/Division High Capacity project, BTA’s Blueprint priority East Portland Neighborhood greenways, safe routes to school: For Every Kid Campaign, Vision Zero and ODOT’s Outer Powell Safety project. The ROSE CDC community building project and Division Midway Alliance were also discussed. Policy makers who attended and spoke at our event were Metro Councilors Bob Stacey, Shirley Craddick, Lori Stegmann and State Representative Jessica Vega Pederson. Many of our community partners also joined us that day, including ROSE CDC, Rosewood Initiative and EPAP.
Between 2014- 2015 BTA successfully led 12 bike workshops and community bike rides to about 200 youth/adults in East Portland area. BTA provided bicycles and leaderships for off and on street bike safety education. Including bike maintenance workshops and provided educational materials (bike maps etc).
T.3. 6 Assess bike safety issues in key areas - Mall 205, Lents, and Division Street;implement improvements.
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Oregon Department of Transportation (ODOT) is working on the design elements necessary to initiate the new construction of a bicycle and pedestrian undercrossing at Division Street as part of the I-205 Multi-Use Path. The undercrossing will be constructed to allow bicyclists and pedestrians to ride or walk on a continuously separated path instead of necessitating the need to cross the 5 lane section of SE Division Street. Construction is slated to begin in the Summer of 2011.
Oregon Department of Transportation (ODOT) in collaboration with TriMet completed the installation of lighting along the I-205 Multi-Use Path from Lents south to Clackamas Town Center with $400,000 in ARRA (federal stimulus funds) in November of 2009. ODOT is continuing its collaboration with TriMet to install lighting along the I-205 Multi-Use Path from Clackamas Town Center to Gladstone which will be complete in 2011. This project also is utilizing ARRA funds.
Oregon Department of Transportation (ODOT) commissioned Alta Planning + Design to conduct a study in the amount of $50,000 to survey and gather technical information regarding the I-205 Multi-Use Path and to make recommendations for improvements. The study will be used to engage the community, prioritize improvements, identify and secure funding to make future improvements along the path within ODOT right-of-way.
On April 18th, 2012, the Portland City Council adopted the East Portland In Motion (EPIM) study, which was put together by PBOT, with the assistance of EPAPbike, the East Portland Land Use & Transportation Committee, and numerous volunteers and stakeholders. The EPIM identifies firm funding for over $25 million in new transportation projects in East Portland for the next five years, including 6 miles of new sidewalks and 35 miles of new bike facilities, as well as bike parking, pedestrian islands, and road rebuilds for parts of Powell Blvd & Sandy Blvd. Improvements near Mall 205: bike lane on 102nd/Cherry Blossom; Community Greenway on 106th (2014) Buffered bike lanes on Division, 82nd to 122nd, 148th to 174th (2014) Community Greenway on 80s through Lents (2011/12)

T.4 Improve safety and multi-modal function of arterial and collector streets throughout East Portland

T.4. 1 Identify and implement low cost/high impact maintenance improvements on SE Powell Boulevard.
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Bureau of Transportation Maintenance Operations maintains island plantings(grass/weeds) on designated area's on SE Powell. Large trees are maintained by City Parks Bureau under the Forestry group.
ODOT is working with the City of Portland to address gathering water at "Lake Powell" just east of I-205 to figure out drainage fix.
T.4. 2 Implement Powell Boulevard Safety Improvements: 122nd Avenue to 136th Avenue.
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On April 18th, 2012, the Portland City Council adopted the East Portland In Motion (EPIM) study, which was put together by PBOT, with the assistance of EPAPbike, the East Portland Land Use & Transportation Committee, and numerous volunteers and stakeholders. The EPIM identifies firm funding for over $25 million in new transportation projects in East Portland for the next five years, including 6 miles of new sidewalks and 35 miles of new bike facilities, as well as bike parking, pedestrian islands, and road rebuilds for parts of Powell Blvd & Sandy Blvd. Improvements will be implemented as part of ODOT plans, and as part of Powell Blvd Conceptual Design of 2012; construction expected in 2015
T.4. 3 Initiate Powell Boulevard street improvement planning; consider TGM grant to begin process.
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Oregon Department of Transportation (ODOT) funded a 2009 Powell Drainage study. The study, conducted by a consultant was in the amount of $150,000. The information gathered will help inform the outer Powell Transportation Growth Management grant. ODOT and DLCD's TGM program awarded $335,000 to the City of Portland to conduct a study for Outer Powell. This is a City-led project where ODOT and PBOT are working closely together with the consultant and the community.
T.4. 4 Implement 102nd Boulevard Improvements - Phase 2.
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Design and right-of-way work for Phase 2 of the 102nd Ave has begun. Street Improvement, construction will likely to begin in late 2012.
On April 18th, 2012, the Portland City Council adopted the East Portland In Motion (EPIM) study, which was put together by PBOT, with the assistance of EPAPbike, the East Portland Land Use & Transportation Committee, and numerous volunteers and stakeholders. The EPIM identifies firm funding for over $25 million in new transportation projects in East Portland for the next five years, including 6 miles of new sidewalks and 35 miles of new bike facilities, as well as bike parking, pedestrian islands, and road rebuilds for parts of Powell Blvd & Sandy Blvd. Bike lanes on 102nd to be added in 2013/14
T.4. 5 Study/ implement signal timing changes on Burnside at 102nd, 122nd, and 148th to improve traffic flow, reduce congestion.
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Trimet has announced an East Portland/East County transit study for January 2013 through December 2013, from 82nd to 223rd, including N-S bus connections, transit stops & facilities, MAX connections & improvements, and access to transit improvements. Trimet controls the signals along E Burnside.
According to Steve Kautz of TriMet, speaking at an EPAP TAC meeting on August 22nd, 2012Trimet's Eastside Enhancement Plan, an transit alternatives analysis, will begin in January 2013 (though December 2013), and is intended to go from 82nd to the east METRO communities. The METRO East Metro Connections Plan will be referenced. They will be looking with a fresh eye to how to use current resources more efficiently and the most useful & productive improvements. The goal is to establish near- and far-term priorities. The Plan is to be done in the context of the Tri-Met financial base inventory and how to build into capitol improvements, as well as how to get to and from bus stops. All the signals along East Burnside from 97th to well within Gresham are TriMet controlled, including at 102nd, 122nd, & 148th.
T.4. 6 Develop sidewalks on 104th Avenue.
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T.4. 7 Develop and implement safety improvement plans for collectors adjacent new development areas: 117th and 136th Avenues.
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On April 18th, 2012, the Portland City Council adopted the East Portland In Motion (EPIM) study, which was put together by PBOT, with the assistance of EPAPbike, the East Portland Land Use & Transportation Committee, and numerous volunteers and stakeholders. The EPIM identifies firm funding for over $25 million in new transportation projects in East Portland for the next five years, including 6 miles of new sidewalks and 35 miles of new bike facilities, as well as bike parking, pedestrian islands, and road rebuilds for parts of Powell Blvd & Sandy Blvd. Sidewalks will be built on SE 136th (one side only) from Division to Holgate, 2013 (funded)
In June 2012, PBOT applied for an ODOT TGM Grant to do the Division-Midway Neighborhood Street Plan project. (This TGM project would cover SE 117th from Stark to Division, & SE 136th from Division to Holgate.) The purpose of the Division-Midway Neighborhood Street Plan is to foster safe and convenient access to commercial destinations along SE Division Street from surrounding neighborhoods by identifying new local street connections and a primary network of walking and bicycling routes at a neighborhood-level (which will feed into the citywide active transportation network). This project will advance objectives identified in the East Portland Action Plan (2009) and Portland Plan (2012) to improve infrastructure, create a healthier environment and expand commercial services so residents can meet their daily needs in close proximity to home. This project will also build upon past transportation planning efforts, including the Far SE Master Street Plan (2001), SE 122nd Avenue Study (2011), Outer Powell Boulevard Conceptual Design Plan (2011-12), and East Portland in Motion (2011). The Division-Midway Neighborhood Street Plan will focus on the neighborhoods served by businesses within the Division-Midway Neighborhood Prosperity Initiative (NPI) district, one of six recently formed urban renewal areas aimed at strengthening the economic competitiveness of neighborhood business districts through community-planned and community-implemented actions and projects. The boundary would reach from SE 112th to SE 148th and extend roughly one mile north to SE Stark (serving the Rosewood NPI) and south to SE Holgate. The study area covers four neighborhoods (Powellhurst Gilbert, Hazelwood, Mill Park, and Centennial) and two business associations (Gateway Area BA and Midway BA). The neighborhoods in the study area have unique street patterns and severe deficiencies in transportation infrastructure, including numerous unpaved and dead-end streets. Much of the area developed as low-density suburban areas that were subsequently annexed into the City of Portland in 1980s and 90s. As a result, street connections were not planned to meet spacing standards and basic roadway infrastructure (such as pavement and/or sidewalks) was often not built at the time of development. Expected Outcomes: • Develop a refined street plan for the study area by identifying opportunities for future full-street and pedestrian-bicycle connections • Evaluate neighborhood streets (i.e. traffic classification of neighborhood collector or local service) by compiling traffic data and determining their functions (current and future) for motor vehicles, pedestrians and bicycles • Identify primary walking and bicycling routes to SE Division Street, schools, parks and other local destinations based on adopted plans, traffic conditions and community input • Distinguish between streets with varying traffic functions and consider changes to street classifications or defining a street typology • Develop a set of local street improvement options at a concept level and determine the streets where each option can be applied • Establish an implementation strategy outlining priority street improvement projects and the process for making local improvements Estimated Proposed Project Budget: $125,000 Project Contact: Denver Igarta, Transportation Planner, (503) 823-1088, Denver.Igarta@portlandoregon.gov Portland Bureau of Transportation, 1120 SW 5th Ave, Suite 800, Portland, Oregon 97204
T.4. 8 Implement 122nd Avenue Safety Improvements at high crash intersections.
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First open house for 122nd is on Sunday, May 1 from 1:00-3:00 at Midland Library. Initial work to identify the high crash intersections (Division, Stark, Glisan, Powell, Halsey) has begun. Next steps include evaluating potential safety improvements. Preparation underway to be ready for discussion with district coalitions and neighbors about proposed improvements planned in September 2011.
On April 18th, 2012, the Portland City Council adopted the East Portland In Motion (EPIM) study, which was put together by PBOT, with the assistance of EPAPbike, the East Portland Land Use & Transportation Committee, and numerous volunteers and stakeholders. The EPIM identifies firm funding for over $25 million in new transportation projects in East Portland for the next five years, including 6 miles of new sidewalks and 35 miles of new bike facilities, as well as bike parking, pedestrian islands, and road rebuilds for parts of Powell Blvd & Sandy Blvd. New infill sidewalks from SE Stephens to Foster, as part of East Portland $8 mil sidewalk program, with additional Metro & ODOT flex funds, 2013
T.4. 9 Implement Sandy Boulevard Safety Improvements: 122nd Avenue to 141st Avenue.
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The Sandy Blvd. (US 30 Bypass) project improves safety between NE 122nd Avenue to NE 141st Avenue by widening and rebuilding the highway. Key project elements include: Add a continuous left-turn median to provide safer vehicle turning movements Two 12-foot travel lanes Two 6-foot bike shoulders One 6-foot sidewalk on the south side only (there are railroad tracks on the north side) One 4-foot planter strip on the south side only Upgrade the traffic signals at the intersections of Sandy Boulevard and NE 122nd Avenue and NE 138th Avenue Install new durable pavement striping Click here for a project information summary (pdf document). Project Need: This stretch of Sandy Boulevard (US 30 Bypass) between NE 122nd Avenue and NE 141st Avenue has a high incidence of crashes. There currently is one lane in each direction, with vehicles headed west stopping traffic to make left turns to businesses on the south side of the highway. Congestion caused by vehicles trying to make left turns also leads to rear-end collisions. Sidewalks are missing in most of the project area. By adding a median turn lane through the project area, vehicles will be able to more safely make left turns. Sidewalks will make it safer for pedestrians to get to their destination. The shoulder/bike lane will give cyclists a safer buffer from motorized traffic. Timeline: ** Project design: now through spring/summer 2012 ** Construction starts: fall/winter 2012 ** Construction ends: winter 2014 Construction Impacts: Lane closures will be required to complete portions of the highway reconstruction. There likely will be temporary delays on Sandy due to construction activities. ODOT will stage construction so that access to businesses will be maintained during construction.
On April 18th, 2012, the Portland City Council adopted the East Portland In Motion (EPIM) study, which was put together by PBOT, with the assistance of EPAPbike, the East Portland Land Use & Transportation Committee, and numerous volunteers and stakeholders. The EPIM identifies firm funding for over $25 million in new transportation projects in East Portland for the next five years, including 6 miles of new sidewalks and 35 miles of new bike facilities, as well as bike parking, pedestrian islands, and road rebuilds for parts of Powell Blvd & Sandy Blvd.
T.4. 10 Initiate Sandy Boulevard street improvement planning; consider TGM grant to begin process.
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T.4. 11 Refurbish and maintain landscape traffic islands: Sandy Blvd (102nd to 122nd); 122nd Avenue (North of Glisan).
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T.4. 12 Repair potholes throughout area.
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The Bureau of Transportation, Maintenance Operations has an enhanced response system that strives to make pothole repairs on a first come basis. Generally potholes are filled within 10 business days. Some pothole locations called in result in mulitiple repairs. Crews scout out the area for other surface road problems and make every effort to be cost efficient by location. This action creates the projected 10 business days or longer response time. All repairs do take into consideration logistics and location. The Bureau of Transportation has developed multiple methods to report potholes and street deficiencies. Maintenace operations has installed 100 informational signs throughout the city informing drivers of a telephone number to call to report potholes, 503-823-BUMP(2867). Residents are also encouraged to visit the city website for details on this program as well as others. www.portlandonline.com/transportation. Since 2004 crews have repaired over 39,000 potholes to date, 12/22/10. Crews do repair potholes on all streets. Crews maintain paved roads to like condition.
T.4. 13 Consider role of SE 136th Avenue Division to Foster - update local and regional designations.
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In June 2012, PBOT applied for an ODOT TGM Grant to do the Division-Midway Neighborhood Street Plan project. (Within the proposed project area is SE 136th, from Division to Holgate.) The purpose of the Division-Midway Neighborhood Street Plan is to foster safe and convenient access to commercial destinations along SE Division Street from surrounding neighborhoods by identifying new local street connections and a primary network of walking and bicycling routes at a neighborhood-level (which will feed into the citywide active transportation network). This project will advance objectives identified in the East Portland Action Plan (2009) and Portland Plan (2012) to improve infrastructure, create a healthier environment and expand commercial services so residents can meet their daily needs in close proximity to home. This project will also build upon past transportation planning efforts, including the Far SE Master Street Plan (2001), SE 122nd Avenue Study (2011), Outer Powell Boulevard Conceptual Design Plan (2011-12), and East Portland in Motion (2011). The Division-Midway Neighborhood Street Plan will focus on the neighborhoods served by businesses within the Division-Midway Neighborhood Prosperity Initiative (NPI) district, one of six recently formed urban renewal areas aimed at strengthening the economic competitiveness of neighborhood business districts through community-planned and community-implemented actions and projects. The boundary would reach from SE 112th to SE 148th and extend roughly one mile north to SE Stark (serving the Rosewood NPI) and south to SE Holgate. The study area covers four neighborhoods (Powellhurst Gilbert, Hazelwood, Mill Park, and Centennial) and two business associations (Gateway Area BA and Midway BA). The neighborhoods in the study area have unique street patterns and severe deficiencies in transportation infrastructure, including numerous unpaved and dead-end streets. Much of the area developed as low-density suburban areas that were subsequently annexed into the City of Portland in 1980s and 90s. As a result, street connections were not planned to meet spacing standards and basic roadway infrastructure (such as pavement and/or sidewalks) was often not built at the time of development. Expected Outcomes: • Develop a refined street plan for the study area by identifying opportunities for future full-street and pedestrian-bicycle connections • Evaluate neighborhood streets (i.e. traffic classification of neighborhood collector or local service) by compiling traffic data and determining their functions (current and future) for motor vehicles, pedestrians and bicycles • Identify primary walking and bicycling routes to SE Division Street, schools, parks and other local destinations based on adopted plans, traffic conditions and community input • Distinguish between streets with varying traffic functions and consider changes to street classifications or defining a street typology • Develop a set of local street improvement options at a concept level and determine the streets where each option can be applied • Establish an implementation strategy outlining priority street improvement projects and the process for making local improvements Estimated Proposed Project Budget: $125,000 Project Contact: Denver Igarta, Transportation Planner, (503) 823-1088, Denver.Igarta@portlandoregon.gov Portland Bureau of Transportation, 1120 SW 5th Ave, Suite 800, Portland, Oregon 97204
T.4. 14 Explore SDC and other funding opportunities for improving SE 136th Avenue, Division to Foster.
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T.4. 15 Advocate to make improvements to Powell Boulevard (US 26) east of I-205 a regional priority.
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T.5 Improve the unimproved local streets in East Portland

T.5. 1 Develop best practices pilot project to accelerate local street improvements; explore funding options, design standards, criteria for qualification.
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Oregon Public Health Institute (OPHI) recently received a 2-year grant from the Kaiser Permanente Community Fund and Northwest Health Foundation to improve pedestrian network connectivity in East Portland by working with the Willamette Pedestrian Coalition (WPC), Organizing People Activating Leaders (OPAL), East Portland community members, and public agencies to develop policies, plans, and practices that will more effectively produce improvements in East Portland's pedestrian networks where pedestrians most need them, including transit stop areas.
A Citywide process was conducted that resulted in Council's adoption of Resolution #35937 on November 1, 2000. The accompanying document was the 11/01/00 Council Report, "Improving Portland's Local Infrastructure: Recommendations for the Local Improvement District Process."
In June 2012, PBOT applied for an ODOT TGM Grant to do the Division-Midway Neighborhood Street Plan project. The purpose of the Division-Midway Neighborhood Street Plan is to foster safe and convenient access to commercial destinations along SE Division Street from surrounding neighborhoods by identifying new local street connections and a primary network of walking and bicycling routes at a neighborhood-level (which will feed into the citywide active transportation network). This project will advance objectives identified in the East Portland Action Plan (2009) and Portland Plan (2012) to improve infrastructure, create a healthier environment and expand commercial services so residents can meet their daily needs in close proximity to home. This project will also build upon past transportation planning efforts, including the Far SE Master Street Plan (2001), SE 122nd Avenue Study (2011), Outer Powell Boulevard Conceptual Design Plan (2011-12), and East Portland in Motion (2011). The Division-Midway Neighborhood Street Plan will focus on the neighborhoods served by businesses within the Division-Midway Neighborhood Prosperity Initiative (NPI) district, one of six recently formed urban renewal areas aimed at strengthening the economic competitiveness of neighborhood business districts through community-planned and community-implemented actions and projects. The boundary would reach from SE 112th to SE 148th and extend roughly one mile north to SE Stark (serving the Rosewood NPI) and south to SE Holgate. The study area covers four neighborhoods (Powellhurst Gilbert, Hazelwood, Mill Park, and Centennial) and two business associations (Gateway Area BA and Midway BA). The neighborhoods in the study area have unique street patterns and severe deficiencies in transportation infrastructure, including numerous unpaved and dead-end streets. Much of the area developed as low-density suburban areas that were subsequently annexed into the City of Portland in 1980s and 90s. As a result, street connections were not planned to meet spacing standards and basic roadway infrastructure (such as pavement and/or sidewalks) was often not built at the time of development. Expected Outcomes: • Develop a refined street plan for the study area by identifying opportunities for future full-street and pedestrian-bicycle connections • Evaluate neighborhood streets (i.e. traffic classification of neighborhood collector or local service) by compiling traffic data and determining their functions (current and future) for motor vehicles, pedestrians and bicycles • Identify primary walking and bicycling routes to SE Division Street, schools, parks and other local destinations based on adopted plans, traffic conditions and community input • Distinguish between streets with varying traffic functions and consider changes to street classifications or defining a street typology • Develop a set of local street improvement options at a concept level and determine the streets where each option can be applied • Establish an implementation strategy outlining priority street improvement projects and the process for making local improvements Estimated Proposed Project Budget: $125,000 Project Contact: Denver Igarta, Transportation Planner, (503) 823-1088, Denver.Igarta@portlandoregon.gov Portland Bureau of Transportation, 1120 SW 5th Ave, Suite 800, Portland, Oregon 97204
T.5. 2 Develop information and outreach campaign to residents along unimproved streets to increase participation in Local Improvement Districts (LIDs).
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PDC partnered with Bureau of Environmental Services, Bureau of Transportation and property owners on NE 97th Ave, from Glisan to Davis. Property owners petitioned, and City Council approved, formation of a Local Improvement District to assist in funding approximately 1/3 of project for street improvements, add sidewalks, and improve the multi-use path. City Council approved construction bid on April 6, 2011.
Outreach was made throughout the Lents Town Center Urban Renewal Area in the summer of 2010 to prioritize the use of Portland Development Commission funding for street improvements. SE 118th Avenue from Pardee Street to Liebe Street was ranked highest per criteria established at the outset of the Lents Town Center URA. Petition support of 74% was achieved and formation of the LID received final Council approval on 5/18/11. Council approved formation of the NE 136th Avenue Phase I LID (from north of Prescott Court to south of Whitaker Way) in the Argay neighborhood on September 1, 2010. This LID was initiated by local property owners and although in the Airport Way Urban Renewal Area, does not utilize urban renewal funding. The SE 152nd Avenue LID (from Barbara Welch to north of Bybee) was completed on April 1, 2009. This LID was initiated by City Council and utilized developer and BES funding.
NE 97th Avenue Green Street LID LID formed by City Council on June 2, 2010. Design complete. First phase of construction: Advertised for bids on April 11, 2011. Opened bids on April 28, 2011. Awarded contract to R&R Construction on June 10, 2011. Paving completed on October 19, 2011. Construction substantially complete on November 10, 2011. Second phase of construction: Advertised for bids on June 20, 2012. Opened bids on July 12, 2012. Awarded contract to Kodiak Pacific Construction on September 12, 2012. Construction scheduled for 11/16/12 through 1/25/13 (schedule provided by contractor as of 10/31/12; subject to change due to weather, utility relocation or other factors). Upcoming construction schedule provided by the contractor as of 1/09/13 (weather permitting and subject to change by contractor): Week of January 7, 2013 No activity Week of January 14, 2013 1) Install NE 97th Avenue conduits for lights Week of January 21, 2013 1) Install NE 97th Avenue conduits for lights Week of January 28, 2013 1) Excavate for NE Everett Place curb and sidewalk 2) Excavate for NE Everett Place roadway 3) Base rock NE Everett Place roadway and curb area 4) Pour NE Everett Place curb Week of February 4, 2013 1) Install NE 97th Avenue street light bases 2) Form and pour NE Everett Place stormwater facility Week of February 11, 2013 1) Backfill NE Everett Place curb 2) Prepare to construct and pour NE Everett Place sidewalks 3) Prepare to construct and pour NE Everett Place driveways Week of February 18, 2013 1) Pour NE Everett Place sidewalks 2) Pour NE Everett Place driveways 3) Install NE Everett Place topsoil 4) Complete NE Everett Place base rock 5) Pave base lift of NE Everett Place 6) Pave top lift of NE Everett Place 7) Install NE Everett Place street lights and pull wire Week of February 25, 2013 1) Install signs 2) Complete NE Everett Place stormwater facility 3) Complete topsoil and seeding Streets include: NE 97th Avenue from Glisan Street to Davis Street Phase I Construction Plans (24 MB *.pdf file) Street and westside sidewalk substantially completed Fall 2011 Swale vegetation work not adjacent to I-205 Multiuse Path to be completed in Spring 2013 Eastside sidewalk will be constructed Fall 2012 following conduit work Street trees to be installed Spring 2013 Interstate 205 Multiuse Path adjacent to NE 97th Avenue Concrete and drainage work substantially completed Fall 2011 Swale vegetation work adjacent to I-205 Multiuse Path to be completed in Winter 2013 Street trees adjacent to I-205 Multiuse Path to be installed Spring 2013 NE Everett Place from NE 97th Avenue to NE 99th Avenue Phase II Construction Plans (25 MB *.pdf file) To be constructed Fall 2012 - Winter 2013 Property owners are funding this local improvement district with partial funding from the Portland Development Commission (tax increment funds from the Gateway Urban Renewal Area) and the Bureau of Environmental Services' Watershed Investment Fund and 1% for Green fund. The Oregon Department of Transportation is funding renovations to the Interstate 205 Multiuse Path. If you have any questions this project, please contact Andrew Aebi, Local Improvement District Administrator and Project Manager, at 503-823-5648 or via e-mail at andrew.aebi@portlandoregon.gov. If you have any questions about the Gateway Urban Renewal Area, please contact Sue Lewis at 503-823-3331 or via e-mail at lewiss@pdc.us. If you have any questions about the Watershed Investment Fund or 1% for Green, please contact Emily Hauth at 503-823-7378 or via e-mail at emily.hauth@portlandoregon.gov. If you have any questions about the Interstate 205 Multiuse Path, please contact Shelli Romero at 503-731-8231 or via e-mail at shelli.romero@state.or.us
NE 136th Avenue Phase I LID LID formed by City Council on September 1, 2010. Design completed on June 11, 2012. Construction Plans Part I (14 MB *.pdf file) Construction Plans Part II (18 MB *.pdf file) Advertised for bids on June 20, 2012. Bids opened on July 12, 2012. Contract awarded to Kodiak Pacific Construction on September 12, 2012. Paving completed on November 7, 2012. Swale vegetation planting and tree planting planned for Spring 2013. Further web site updates not planned. Streets include: NE 136th Avenue north of Prescott Court (from north property line of 4525 NE 136th Avenue) to 80 feet south of Whitaker Way Property owners are funding this local improvement district with partial funding from the Portland Bureau of Transportation for overhead costs. If you have any questions this project, please contact Andrew Aebi, Local Improvement District Administrator and Project Manager, at 503-823-5648 or via e-mail at andrew.aebi@portlandoregon.gov.
T.5. 3 Evaluate and modify policy and administration for building sidewalks on public streets during development process (address waiver of remonstrance issue).
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Oregon Public Health Institute (OPHI) recently received a 2-year grant from the Kaiser Permanente Community Fund and Northwest Health Foundation to improve pedestrian network connectivity in East Portland by working with the Willamette Pedestrian Coalition (WPC), Organizing People Activating Leaders (OPAL), East Portland community members, and public agencies to develop policies, plans, and practices that will more effectively produce improvements in East Portland's pedestrian networks where pedestrians most need them, including transit stop areas.
T.5. 4 Study and develop an alternative street standard for local streets in East Portland.
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Oregon Public Health Institute (OPHI) recently received a 2-year grant from the Kaiser Permanente Community Fund and Northwest Health Foundation to improve pedestrian network connectivity in East Portland by working with the Willamette Pedestrian Coalition (WPC), Organizing People Activating Leaders (OPAL), East Portland community members, and public agencies to develop policies, plans, and practices that will more effectively produce improvements in East Portland's pedestrian networks where pedestrians most need them, including transit stop areas.
In June 2012, PBOT applied for an ODOT TGM Grant to do the Division-Midway Neighborhood Street Plan project. The purpose of the Division-Midway Neighborhood Street Plan is to foster safe and convenient access to commercial destinations along SE Division Street from surrounding neighborhoods by identifying new local street connections and a primary network of walking and bicycling routes at a neighborhood-level (which will feed into the citywide active transportation network). This project will advance objectives identified in the East Portland Action Plan (2009) and Portland Plan (2012) to improve infrastructure, create a healthier environment and expand commercial services so residents can meet their daily needs in close proximity to home. This project will also build upon past transportation planning efforts, including the Far SE Master Street Plan (2001), SE 122nd Avenue Study (2011), Outer Powell Boulevard Conceptual Design Plan (2011-12), and East Portland in Motion (2011). The Division-Midway Neighborhood Street Plan will focus on the neighborhoods served by businesses within the Division-Midway Neighborhood Prosperity Initiative (NPI) district, one of six recently formed urban renewal areas aimed at strengthening the economic competitiveness of neighborhood business districts through community-planned and community-implemented actions and projects. The boundary would reach from SE 112th to SE 148th and extend roughly one mile north to SE Stark (serving the Rosewood NPI) and south to SE Holgate. The study area covers four neighborhoods (Powellhurst Gilbert, Hazelwood, Mill Park, and Centennial) and two business associations (Gateway Area BA and Midway BA). The neighborhoods in the study area have unique street patterns and severe deficiencies in transportation infrastructure, including numerous unpaved and dead-end streets. Much of the area developed as low-density suburban areas that were subsequently annexed into the City of Portland in 1980s and 90s. As a result, street connections were not planned to meet spacing standards and basic roadway infrastructure (such as pavement and/or sidewalks) was often not built at the time of development. Expected Outcomes: • Develop a refined street plan for the study area by identifying opportunities for future full-street and pedestrian-bicycle connections • Evaluate neighborhood streets (i.e. traffic classification of neighborhood collector or local service) by compiling traffic data and determining their functions (current and future) for motor vehicles, pedestrians and bicycles • Identify primary walking and bicycling routes to SE Division Street, schools, parks and other local destinations based on adopted plans, traffic conditions and community input • Distinguish between streets with varying traffic functions and consider changes to street classifications or defining a street typology • Develop a set of local street improvement options at a concept level and determine the streets where each option can be applied • Establish an implementation strategy outlining priority street improvement projects and the process for making local improvements Estimated Proposed Project Budget: $125,000 Project Contact: Denver Igarta, Transportation Planner, (503) 823-1088, Denver.Igarta@portlandoregon.gov Portland Bureau of Transportation, 1120 SW 5th Ave, Suite 800, Portland, Oregon 97204

T.6 Improve connectivity in East Portland

T.6. 1 Develop a complete and more well-defined future street plan for East Portland.
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Oregon Public Health Institute (OPHI) recently received a 2-year grant from the Kaiser Permanente Community Fund and Northwest Health Foundation to improve pedestrian network connectivity in East Portland by working with the Willamette Pedestrian Coalition (WPC), Organizing People Activating Leaders (OPAL), East Portland community members, and public agencies to develop policies, plans, and practices that will more effectively produce improvements in East Portland's pedestrian networks where pedestrians most need them, including transit stop areas.
In June 2012, PBOT applied for an ODOT TGM Grant to do the Division-Midway Neighborhood Street Plan project. The purpose of the Division-Midway Neighborhood Street Plan is to foster safe and convenient access to commercial destinations along SE Division Street from surrounding neighborhoods by identifying new local street connections and a primary network of walking and bicycling routes at a neighborhood-level (which will feed into the citywide active transportation network). This project will advance objectives identified in the East Portland Action Plan (2009) and Portland Plan (2012) to improve infrastructure, create a healthier environment and expand commercial services so residents can meet their daily needs in close proximity to home. This project will also build upon past transportation planning efforts, including the Far SE Master Street Plan (2001), SE 122nd Avenue Study (2011), Outer Powell Boulevard Conceptual Design Plan (2011-12), and East Portland in Motion (2011). The Division-Midway Neighborhood Street Plan will focus on the neighborhoods served by businesses within the Division-Midway Neighborhood Prosperity Initiative (NPI) district, one of six recently formed urban renewal areas aimed at strengthening the economic competitiveness of neighborhood business districts through community-planned and community-implemented actions and projects. The boundary would reach from SE 112th to SE 148th and extend roughly one mile north to SE Stark (serving the Rosewood NPI) and south to SE Holgate. The study area covers four neighborhoods (Powellhurst Gilbert, Hazelwood, Mill Park, and Centennial) and two business associations (Gateway Area BA and Midway BA). The neighborhoods in the study area have unique street patterns and severe deficiencies in transportation infrastructure, including numerous unpaved and dead-end streets. Much of the area developed as low-density suburban areas that were subsequently annexed into the City of Portland in 1980s and 90s. As a result, street connections were not planned to meet spacing standards and basic roadway infrastructure (such as pavement and/or sidewalks) was often not built at the time of development. Expected Outcomes: • Develop a refined street plan for the study area by identifying opportunities for future full-street and pedestrian-bicycle connections • Evaluate neighborhood streets (i.e. traffic classification of neighborhood collector or local service) by compiling traffic data and determining their functions (current and future) for motor vehicles, pedestrians and bicycles • Identify primary walking and bicycling routes to SE Division Street, schools, parks and other local destinations based on adopted plans, traffic conditions and community input • Distinguish between streets with varying traffic functions and consider changes to street classifications or defining a street typology • Develop a set of local street improvement options at a concept level and determine the streets where each option can be applied • Establish an implementation strategy outlining priority street improvement projects and the process for making local improvements Estimated Proposed Project Budget: $125,000 Project Contact: Denver Igarta, Transportation Planner, (503) 823-1088, Denver.Igarta@portlandoregon.gov Portland Bureau of Transportation, 1120 SW 5th Ave, Suite 800, Portland, Oregon 97204
T.6. 2 Develop priorities for decision-making on transportation improvements; consider connections to parks/open space/schools, "green street" design, public safety needs.
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Oregon Public Health Institute (OPHI) recently received a 2-year grant from the Kaiser Permanente Community Fund and Northwest Health Foundation to improve pedestrian network connectivity in East Portland by working with the Willamette Pedestrian Coalition (WPC), Organizing People Activating Leaders (OPAL), East Portland community members, and public agencies to develop policies, plans, and practices that will more effectively produce improvements in East Portland's pedestrian networks where pedestrians most need them, including transit stop areas.
Trimet has announced an East Portland/East County transit study for January 2013 through December 2013, from 82nd to 223rd, including N-S bus connections, transit stops & facilities, MAX connections & improvements, and access to transit improvements.
The TriMet Board of Directors established a Transit Equity Advisory Committee (TEAC) in early May 2013 to extend the agency's outreach to the public, in response to advocacy from OPAL and Bus Riders Unite.
Wisdom of the Elders Workforce Development is building partnerships with other nonprofit organizations in East Portland to increase "green streets" including the Green Lents Pollinator Project. WWD interns worked with Green Lents in the fall to create a landscape design for a median area off Foster Road and 91st. The interns prepared the site, created their medicine wheel design with painted rocks and planted shrubs. The local neighborhood invited the interns to join them in completing the planting activities on the weekend.
T.6. 3 Initiate a Powellhurst-Gilbert connectivity and urban form study. (see H.6.3)
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In June 2012, PBOT applied for an ODOT TGM Grant to do the Division-Midway Neighborhood Street Plan project. The purpose of the Division-Midway Neighborhood Street Plan is to foster safe and convenient access to commercial destinations along SE Division Street from surrounding neighborhoods by identifying new local street connections and a primary network of walking and bicycling routes at a neighborhood-level (which will feed into the citywide active transportation network). This project will advance objectives identified in the East Portland Action Plan (2009) and Portland Plan (2012) to improve infrastructure, create a healthier environment and expand commercial services so residents can meet their daily needs in close proximity to home. This project will also build upon past transportation planning efforts, including the Far SE Master Street Plan (2001), SE 122nd Avenue Study (2011), Outer Powell Boulevard Conceptual Design Plan (2011-12), and East Portland in Motion (2011). The Division-Midway Neighborhood Street Plan will focus on the neighborhoods served by businesses within the Division-Midway Neighborhood Prosperity Initiative (NPI) district, one of six recently formed urban renewal areas aimed at strengthening the economic competitiveness of neighborhood business districts through community-planned and community-implemented actions and projects. The boundary would reach from SE 112th to SE 148th and extend roughly one mile north to SE Stark (serving the Rosewood NPI) and south to SE Holgate. The study area covers four neighborhoods (Powellhurst Gilbert, Hazelwood, Mill Park, and Centennial) and two business associations (Gateway Area BA and Midway BA). (The portion of Powellhurst-Gilbert included in the proposed project is from SE 112th to 142nd, and from SE Division to Holgate.) The neighborhoods in the study area have unique street patterns and severe deficiencies in transportation infrastructure, including numerous unpaved and dead-end streets. Much of the area developed as low-density suburban areas that were subsequently annexed into the City of Portland in 1980s and 90s. As a result, street connections were not planned to meet spacing standards and basic roadway infrastructure (such as pavement and/or sidewalks) was often not built at the time of development. Expected Outcomes: • Develop a refined street plan for the study area by identifying opportunities for future full-street and pedestrian-bicycle connections • Evaluate neighborhood streets (i.e. traffic classification of neighborhood collector or local service) by compiling traffic data and determining their functions (current and future) for motor vehicles, pedestrians and bicycles • Identify primary walking and bicycling routes to SE Division Street, schools, parks and other local destinations based on adopted plans, traffic conditions and community input • Distinguish between streets with varying traffic functions and consider changes to street classifications or defining a street typology • Develop a set of local street improvement options at a concept level and determine the streets where each option can be applied • Establish an implementation strategy outlining priority street improvement projects and the process for making local improvements Estimated Proposed Project Budget: $125,000 Project Contact: Denver Igarta, Transportation Planner, (503) 823-1088, Denver.Igarta@portlandoregon.gov Portland Bureau of Transportation, 1120 SW 5th Ave, Suite 800, Portland, Oregon 97204
2012 Oct 11th, Denver Igarta (PBOT, 503-823-1088) emailed: We received good news from ODOT that our TGM proposal for the Division-Midway Neighborhood Street Plan (112th to 148th, Stark to Holgate) was selected and will be awarded a planning grant for the amount ($135,000) that was requested. The timeline for the project remains uncertain. Typically, the duration of the planning process for TGM projects is roughly a 12-month period. The grant requires that the Plan (TGM project) be completed before July 2014. Once a project manager is assigned here at PBOT, we will initiate negotiations with ODOT on developing the project scope of work. That process will take place over the coming months. I will keep you posted as more specifics come to light. In the meantime, please don’t hesitate to contact me if you have ideas or questions. Also, let me know if there are others I should notify. This is a street connectivity study, and the area includes a large portion of Powellhurst-Gilbert (Division to Holgate, SE 112th to 143rd).
T.6. 4 Explore ways to improve the function, safety and convenience of the I-205 interchanges at Division Street and Powell Boulevard.
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The Regional Transportation Plan (RTP) includes Mobility Corridor Strategies that identify improvements needed in the region, including East Portland corridors. The RTP sets the policy direction for transportation planning in the region as well as eligibility for federal transportation funding. Mobility Corridor # 8: Oregon City to Gateway: identifies I-205 Powell/Division interchanges as facilities needing improvement. Inclusion in the RTP makes it possible to secure federal funds for these improvements and the mobility corridor strategies will be used as a guide for priorities and local agency implementation.
T.6. 5 Institute policy and develop plan to provide accessible transportation options (sidewalks, streets, connections) for people with physical disabilities.
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- Aging & Disabilities Services is revising county funded transportation services for seniors & people with disabilities in East Portland to increase door-to-door transit options.
Oregon Public Health Institute (OPHI) recently received a 2-year grant from the Kaiser Permanente Community Fund and Northwest Health Foundation to improve pedestrian network connectivity in East Portland by working with the Willamette Pedestrian Coalition (WPC), Organizing People Activating Leaders (OPAL), East Portland community members, and public agencies to develop policies, plans, and practices that will more effectively produce improvements in East Portland's pedestrian networks where pedestrians most need them, including transit stop areas.
In June 2012, PBOT applied for an ODOT TGM Grant to do the Division-Midway Neighborhood Street Plan project. The purpose of the Division-Midway Neighborhood Street Plan is to foster safe and convenient access to commercial destinations along SE Division Street from surrounding neighborhoods by identifying new local street connections and a primary network of walking and bicycling routes at a neighborhood-level (which will feed into the citywide active transportation network). This project will advance objectives identified in the East Portland Action Plan (2009) and Portland Plan (2012) to improve infrastructure, create a healthier environment and expand commercial services so residents can meet their daily needs in close proximity to home. This project will also build upon past transportation planning efforts, including the Far SE Master Street Plan (2001), SE 122nd Avenue Study (2011), Outer Powell Boulevard Conceptual Design Plan (2011-12), and East Portland in Motion (2011). The Division-Midway Neighborhood Street Plan will focus on the neighborhoods served by businesses within the Division-Midway Neighborhood Prosperity Initiative (NPI) district, one of six recently formed urban renewal areas aimed at strengthening the economic competitiveness of neighborhood business districts through community-planned and community-implemented actions and projects. The boundary would reach from SE 112th to SE 148th and extend roughly one mile north to SE Stark (serving the Rosewood NPI) and south to SE Holgate. The study area covers four neighborhoods (Powellhurst Gilbert, Hazelwood, Mill Park, and Centennial) and two business associations (Gateway Area BA and Midway BA). The neighborhoods in the study area have unique street patterns and severe deficiencies in transportation infrastructure, including numerous unpaved and dead-end streets. Much of the area developed as low-density suburban areas that were subsequently annexed into the City of Portland in 1980s and 90s. As a result, street connections were not planned to meet spacing standards and basic roadway infrastructure (such as pavement and/or sidewalks) was often not built at the time of development. Expected Outcomes: • Develop a refined street plan for the study area by identifying opportunities for future full-street and pedestrian-bicycle connections • Evaluate neighborhood streets (i.e. traffic classification of neighborhood collector or local service) by compiling traffic data and determining their functions (current and future) for motor vehicles, pedestrians and bicycles • Identify primary walking and bicycling routes to SE Division Street, schools, parks and other local destinations based on adopted plans, traffic conditions and community input • Distinguish between streets with varying traffic functions and consider changes to street classifications or defining a street typology • Develop a set of local street improvement options at a concept level and determine the streets where each option can be applied • Establish an implementation strategy outlining priority street improvement projects and the process for making local improvements Estimated Proposed Project Budget: $125,000 Project Contact: Denver Igarta, Transportation Planner, (503) 823-1088, Denver.Igarta@portlandoregon.gov Portland Bureau of Transportation, 1120 SW 5th Ave, Suite 800, Portland, Oregon 97204
T.6. 6 Acquire property and develop streets in Central Gateway.
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Portland Development Commission partnered with Bureau of Environmental Services and property owners on NE 97th Avenue, beginning at Glisan to Davis, for street improvements and add sidewalks. This will lay the foundation for a proposed redevelopment project that would dedicate property adding NE Flanders, which would connect NE 97th to NE 99th, improving connectivity and pedestrian/bicycle access. Construction Bid for NE 97th Ave improvements published 4/11/11, closing 4/28/11.

T.7 Foster equity in transportation decisions and services

T.7. 1 Prioritize East Portland schools in "safer routes to school" funding and implementation. (see T.2.1)
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Oliver and Parklane Elementary were awarded grant funds from East Portland Action Plan to work with the City of Portland's Active Transportation department and Safe Routes to School to create safe walking and biking area in their neighborhood. The elementary schools were awarded funding for a Continuing Services Plan which includes an Engineering Strategies report. Community input was gathered through "Movie in the Park" events, Back to School Nights, PTOs, and neighborhood associations, more than 800 community members, to identify dangerous places and obstacles in the walking or biking.
OPAL and Bus Riders Unite, in part through grant funding from the East Portland Action Plan, were able to establish a strong partnership with the Multnomah Youth Commission, resulting in a stronger Sustainability Committee with greater focus around youth access to transit and YouthPass. OPAL has advanced the concept of a Youth Transit Justice Summit anchored in East Portland to serve as a catalyst for a renewed YouthPass campaign, held in May 2014 at David Douglas High School.
OPAL and youth Bus Riders Unite members, in part through grant funding from the East Portland Action Plan, were able work alongside the Multnomah Youth Commission to host the first ever Youth Transit Justice Summit on May 17th at David Douglas High School. In the 2 months leading up to the summit we organized hour-long focus groups in schools: Centennial, Parkrose (two focus groups were held), David Douglas, Reynolds Learning Academy (RLA), and Reynolds. During these sessions we learned the concerns, struggles which help inform and develop the break out session for the summit. At the summit we were able to create a finalized set of policy recommendations (please see attached Youth Summit on Transit Justice policy recommendations) , 1 video of a youth's journey to school from East Portland, and data from our break out sessions. At the summit we had 64 youth and 5 adults registered; 20 East Portland youth attended.
T.7. 2 Identify and prioritize East Portland street improvement projects.
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Advocating for fair share and more of transportation investment in East Portland communities at local (City) and regional (TriMet and Metro's Regional Flexible Fund Taskforce) levels.
Oregon Public Health Institute (OPHI) recently received a 2-year grant from the Kaiser Permanente Community Fund and Northwest Health Foundation to improve pedestrian network connectivity in East Portland by working with the Willamette Pedestrian Coalition (WPC), Organizing People Activating Leaders (OPAL), East Portland community members, and public agencies to develop policies, plans, and practices that will more effectively produce improvements in East Portland's pedestrian networks where pedestrians most need them, including transit stop areas.
On April 18th, 2012, the Portland City Council adopted the East Portland In Motion (EPIM) study, which was put together by PBOT, with the assistance of EPAPbike, the East Portland Land Use & Transportation Committee, and numerous volunteers and stakeholders. The EPIM identifies firm funding for over $25 million in new transportation projects in East Portland for the next five years, including 6 miles of new sidewalks and 35 miles of new bike facilities, as well as bike parking, pedestrian islands, and road rebuilds for parts of Powell Blvd & Sandy Blvd.
Since 2009, EPAP community members have successfully advocated for over $30 million in transportation improvements for East Portland, including over $8 million in new arterial sidewalks and infill sidewalks, over 25 miles of new community greenways (bicycle boulevards), and over $7.5 million in matching funds from State and Federal sources for active transportation improvements. Since about $11 million of the improvements were "already in the pipeline", about $19 million is for "new" projects that would not have occurred without EPAP community advocacy. David Hampsten, Hazelwood NA Board member, has served as the East Portland representative to the City of Portland PBOT Transportation Budget Advisory Committee since December 2009, and helped identify many of the funds and funding sources for targeted advocacy. Linda Bauer, Chair of the East Portland Land Use & Transportation Committee since before 2000, has been a strong, subtle, and steady lobbyist for transportation improvements in East Portland for over two decades. Katie Larsell, Jim Chasse, Nick Suavie, Bonny McKnight, Arlene Kimura, and Mark White, as well as many others, have been keen and passionate public transportation advocates, often interacting with the Mayor and City Council.
In June 2012, PBOT applied for an ODOT TGM Grant to do the Division-Midway Neighborhood Street Plan project. The purpose of the Division-Midway Neighborhood Street Plan is to foster safe and convenient access to commercial destinations along SE Division Street from surrounding neighborhoods by identifying new local street connections and a primary network of walking and bicycling routes at a neighborhood-level (which will feed into the citywide active transportation network). This project will advance objectives identified in the East Portland Action Plan (2009) and Portland Plan (2012) to improve infrastructure, create a healthier environment and expand commercial services so residents can meet their daily needs in close proximity to home. This project will also build upon past transportation planning efforts, including the Far SE Master Street Plan (2001), SE 122nd Avenue Study (2011), Outer Powell Boulevard Conceptual Design Plan (2011-12), and East Portland in Motion (2011). The Division-Midway Neighborhood Street Plan will focus on the neighborhoods served by businesses within the Division-Midway Neighborhood Prosperity Initiative (NPI) district, one of six recently formed urban renewal areas aimed at strengthening the economic competitiveness of neighborhood business districts through community-planned and community-implemented actions and projects. The boundary would reach from SE 112th to SE 148th and extend roughly one mile north to SE Stark (serving the Rosewood NPI) and south to SE Holgate. The study area covers four neighborhoods (Powellhurst Gilbert, Hazelwood, Mill Park, and Centennial) and two business associations (Gateway Area BA and Midway BA). The neighborhoods in the study area have unique street patterns and severe deficiencies in transportation infrastructure, including numerous unpaved and dead-end streets. Much of the area developed as low-density suburban areas that were subsequently annexed into the City of Portland in 1980s and 90s. As a result, street connections were not planned to meet spacing standards and basic roadway infrastructure (such as pavement and/or sidewalks) was often not built at the time of development. Expected Outcomes: • Develop a refined street plan for the study area by identifying opportunities for future full-street and pedestrian-bicycle connections • Evaluate neighborhood streets (i.e. traffic classification of neighborhood collector or local service) by compiling traffic data and determining their functions (current and future) for motor vehicles, pedestrians and bicycles • Identify primary walking and bicycling routes to SE Division Street, schools, parks and other local destinations based on adopted plans, traffic conditions and community input • Distinguish between streets with varying traffic functions and consider changes to street classifications or defining a street typology • Develop a set of local street improvement options at a concept level and determine the streets where each option can be applied • Establish an implementation strategy outlining priority street improvement projects and the process for making local improvements Estimated Proposed Project Budget: $125,000 Project Contact: Denver Igarta, Transportation Planner, (503) 823-1088, Denver.Igarta@portlandoregon.gov Portland Bureau of Transportation, 1120 SW 5th Ave, Suite 800, Portland, Oregon 97204
The Oliver and Parklane's Continuing Services Plan and Engineering Strategies report will be created based on community input from Safe Routes to School Tabling events, with more then 800 community members in attendance. We held a community walk-around meeting with Scott Batson of the Active Transportation Department to look at the concerns within the neighborhood and brainstorm possible solutions and updates that will encourage more walking and biking. Once the Engineering Strategies Repot is drafted, we will host another community meeting to prioritize the projects based on the communities needs.
SE 118th Avenue from Pardee Street to Liebe Street is substantially complete and is no longer unpaved. The segment from south of Schiller Street to Liebe Street through the northeast corner of Raymond Park is a new segment, and eliminates two-dead end streets (SE 118th Avenue and SE Liebe Street), providing better connectivity for local residents and park users.
Improvements to NE 136th Avenue from Whitaker Way to north of Prescott Court are substantially complete; most of this block is no longer unpaved. Now there is just one remaining unpaved street segment (366 feet) left in the Argay neighborhood.
T.7. 3 Prioritize transportation safety improvements at high-crash intersections.
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On April 18th, 2012, the Portland City Council adopted the East Portland In Motion (EPIM) study, which was put together by PBOT, with the assistance of EPAPbike, the East Portland Land Use & Transportation Committee, and numerous volunteers and stakeholders. The EPIM identifies firm funding for over $25 million in new transportation projects in East Portland for the next five years, including 6 miles of new sidewalks and 35 miles of new bike facilities, as well as bike parking, pedestrian islands, and road rebuilds for parts of Powell Blvd & Sandy Blvd. Study identified the major high-crash streets in East Portland and will implements several improvements by 2017
T.7. 4 Establish East Portland Neighborhood Office transportation committee to prioritize projects and advocate with committees and elected-officials.
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Developed community-based leadership team comprised of East Portland bus riders and transit activists; will integrate this effort into EPAP efforts in 2011 so as to assist with and lead prioritization and advocacy
No separate Transportation committee created, instead, EPAP directs people to the East Portland Land Use and Transportation Committee and established the Chair of that Committee as the EPAP Representative on Transportation, thus honoring an existing construct in East Portland. The Committee works with the EPAP to organize develop recommendations for PBOT's East Portland In Motion and EPAP organized testimony before City Council that influenced the full Adoption of the EPIM, which prioritizes sidewalk, transit, and bicycle improvements. EPLUTC and EPAP have successfully partnered to direct funding from two Federal Flexible Funds sources and two TGM grants to East Portland. EPAP has established the Transit Rider and EPAPbike Subcommitees. EPAP has established the East Portland Land Use and Transportation Chair as EPAP's Representative on Transprotation, Representation on the City of Portland Bureau of Transportation Budget Advisory Committee, Representation on the I-205 Multi-Use Path development, multiple representatives on the Outer Powell Blvd. Conceptual Design Project (which was adopted with the advocacy and testimony of EPAP members), and EPAP members organized Neighborhood and School District input on the City adopted East Portland In Motion plan that prioritized equitable transportaltin improvements in East Portland. EPAP worked with PBOT staff to structure integration of action item integration into the Transportation Service Plan document that informs the Comprehensive Plan. EPAP provided initial funding for the the Outer Powell Blvd. Conceptual Design Project. EPAP members were selected to advise ODOT on the Powell Blvd. Safety Project design. EPAP has made funding of the improvements on Powell Blvd. a priority project and has been actively advocating for 2015-18 STIP fundinging for this project. EPAP was a co-sponsor of the Equity Rides in 2011 and 2012.
T.7. 5 Engage Bicycle Transportation Alliance, Elders in Action and Willamette Ped Coalition in advocating for East Portland safety improvements.
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EPAP Bike Committee formed and active. Bicycle Transportation Alliance has sent representation to this meeting and EPAP bike members are active with BTA. An EPAP Co-Chair received award recognition in 2011 from the Willamette Pedestrian Coalition and EPAP has included their members and leadership in active advocacy for East Portland projects.
BTA's employed in 2013 a full time bilingual organizer for East Portland. Organizer is now an active member of EPAP Bike Subcommittee and is focused on advocacy efforts for East Portland Projects with EPAP Bike.
T.7. 6 Study impact of Urban Growth Boundary expansion on future traffic on Foster Road, Powell Boulevard and other key streets. Develop regional funding approach for necessary improvements.
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Trimet has announced an East Portland/East County transit study for January 2013 through December 2013, from 82nd to 223rd, including N-S bus connections, transit stops & facilities, MAX connections & improvements, and access to transit improvements. This study will also look at high-capacity transit (BRT) along Division & Powell.