NA.1 Improve environmental function of urbanized areas and mitigate impacts

NA.1. 1 Create and implement program to maximize native/low-maintenance/drought-tolerant landscaping of public spaces throughout East Portland: public buildings/properties, street medians, schools.
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The Powellhurst-Gilbert Neighborhood Association has an established long term restoration project on the Springwater Corridor between SE 128th and SE 136th. Several events have taken place that have removed invasive species such as ivy and blackberries and replaced it with native species. At least two native species plantings have already taken place.
The Hazelwood Neighborhood Association is exploring the possibility of adopting a section of the new 97th Ave "green street" -- the segment just south of NE Glisan. In addition to maintaining the new swale at that location, they are working on plans to landscape the bank between the I-205 MUP and the light rail track, using native plants compatible with the lone pine tree on the bank now. They are working with ODOT and Friends of Trees.
Led by Ecology in Classrooms and Outdoors (ECO), third, fourth and fifth grade students from Lent School have installed a rain garden, native plant garden and an insectary within the school's Garden and Outdoor Education Space (GOES). In addition to efforts put forth by students, community members and neighbors have contributed to the creation and maintenance of the greater garden space during multiple work parties.
Lents Youth Initiative leveraged funding from Multnomah County Soil and Water Conservation to plant a bioswale outside the Beyer Court Apartments (93/Harold) with native plants and other natural plants to reduce street flooding and capture runoff.
In the Spring, Wisdom Workforce Development interns worked in the Kelly Butte Natural Area providing invasive species removal (ivy), and maintenance and mulching of recently planted native species.
NA.1. 2 Increase street tree plantings throughout East Portland.
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The Powellhurst-Gilbert Neighborhood Association has joined the Friends of Trees for plantings in the neighborhood in 2009 and 2010. A new neighborhood tree coordinator is on board and already planning for 2011.
An Arbor Day tree planting was held at West Powellhurst Park in the Powellhurst-Gilbert Neighborhood in 2009. It was the first time the City of Portland conducted a Arbor Day planting in East Portland.
Friends of trees did a street tree planting event in the Hazelwood Neighborhood.
Between November 2009 and April 2014, nearly 5,000 new street and public trees were planted in partnerships between Portland Environmental Services, Friends of Trees, Oregon Department of Transportation, Portland Bureau of Transportation, Portland Parks and Recreation, schools, private residences, and businesses in East Portland neighborhoods. These include: • 4,162 new street trees along residential and commercial streets; • 553 trees along I-205, I-84, and Sandy Blvd; and • 230 trees planted at Alder, Glenfair, Margaret Scott, Cherry Park, and Ventura Park elementary schools, the David Douglas bus facility, and David Douglas High School. The main mechanisms for tree planting were the Environmental Services Tree Program and the Friends of Trees Neighborhood Trees Program.
NA.1. 3 Develop standards to maximize application of "green streets" to serve multiple neighborhood objectives: stormwater management, pedestrian safety, green space.
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On April 18th, 2012, the Portland City Council adopted (this was done with EPAP member advocacy, insteadi of just accepting the report) the East Portland In Motion (EPIM) study, which was put together by PBOT, with the assistance of EPAPbike, the East Portland Land Use & Transportation Committee, and numerous volunteers and stakeholders. The EPIM identifies firm funding for over $25 million in new transportation projects in East Portland for the next five years, including 6 miles of new sidewalks and 35 miles of new bike facilities, as well as bike parking, pedestrian islands, and road rebuilds for parts of Powell Blvd & Sandy Blvd.
NA.1. 4 Develop Citywide Tree Code initiative to address tree code and development issues.
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The Portland City Council adopted the Citywide Tree Project and portions of the project went into effect on July 1, 2011. The project manager is Roberta Jortner (503-823-7855). The project web site describes how the elements of the project will be implemented over time: http://www.portlandonline.com/bps/index.cfm?c=46921 the documents can be viewed at: http://www.portlandonline.com/bps/index.cfm?c=47008&
NA.1. 5 Expand school composting program.
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Ron Russell Middle School in the Powellhurst-Gilbert Neighborhood has a worm composting project.

NA.2 Improve natural areas throughout East Portland

NA.2. 1 Improve Johnson Creek habitat and flood storage.
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Restoration of the Johnson Creek watershed in the Leach Botanical Garden properties continues and will be enhanced by a Johnson Creek Watershed Council/ Leach joint project in March. A spawned coho was found on the banks of the Creek in the Park in January.
On Feb 19th, Members of Powellhurst-Gilbert Neighborhood planted 180 wildflowers East of SE 128th Ave., along the North side of the Springwater Trail. The area planted had been cleared of an over growth of chickary on Jan. 17th and is approximately 15,000 sq. ft. We may be able to arrange another planting before the end of March. PGNA, with PP&Rec will again be pulling ivy on the South side of the Springwater Trail on March 26th, near the same location. Some members of the Powellhurst-Gilbert Neighborhood will also be assisting Johnson Creek Watershed Council in their Watershed Wide Event, pulling ivy at Leach Botanical Gardens on March 5th. These upcoming events are contingent on the weather.
Completed land aquisition for E Lents Floodplain Restoration Project in 2011, for a total of 119 acres preserved in frequently flooded and sensitive natural areas. Construction on Phase I E Lents Floodplain project will begin this spring. Phase II is in early design. BES acquired a $2.7 million FEMA grant for this project. Total design and construction project costs are approximately $6 million with land acquisition costs of approximately $10 million.
BES is working with Portland Parks and the Army Corps of Engineers to restore the wetlands west of Beggars Tick to the base of Zenger Farm. The Springwater Wetlands project has been a work in progress, awaiting Army Corps funding since 2002. City staff is currently working with Army Corps to finalize the planning and design process. Construction is expected to start in 2012 with removal of invasive species from the wetlands. The project will improve the function and habitat value of the wetlands. Pending funding, the project may include pedestrian access and a public use 'hub'.
Work is underway on the East Lents Floodplain Restoration Project. This is the first year of a two-year project to restore 24 acres of floodplain on a 70-acre site located south of Foster Road between SE 106th Avenue and the Brookside Wetlands (east of SE 111th/112th Ave). In addition the project will: - Add flood storage - Reduce the frequency of flooding on Foster Road, area homes and businesses (Johnson Creek currently floods an average of every other year.) - Improve habitat for fish, birds and other wildlife - Recreate stream channels and shade the creek - Help meet State of Oregon water quality standards and Endangered Species Act requirements - Help revitalize the Lents area The project includes removing more than 50,000 cubic yards of soil (about 5,000 dump truck loads) from lowlands next to Johnson Creek to reconnect the creek to its floodplain. After excavation is complete, Environmental Services will revegetate the project site with about 70,000 native trees and shrubs. For more information see the Environmental Services' website, search: East Lents Floodplain Restoration Project or contact David Allred at 503-823-7287 or david.allred@portlandoregon.gov
David Allred, Bureau of Environmental Services (David.Allred@PortlandOregon.gov)posted the following: East Lents Flood Plain Restoration, Phase II -- Project update May 9, 2012 Though construction season doesn’t start for a few more weeks, a lot has been happening on the East Lents project. The January 19th flood demonstated the usefulness of the project in helping control flood waters. This was a "five year" flood that formerly would have been likely to close Foster Rd. To get ready for construction of Phase II, several large trees were de-limbed to encouage spring birds to nest elsewhere. The remainder of these trees will be taken down when construction resumes in May. Some of the trunks and root balls will be used in the stream for bank stabilization and fish refuge. The Rollin' Tire interpretive kiosk at 108th and Foster has been completed. Visit the kiosk and look at the information boards. 2012 Construction Season--work starts in late May. The same contractor that worked on the project last year, Tapani Underground Inc., won the construction bid this year. They’ll start work in May or June and should be finished in November. This year’s activities will include: Removing the bridges and most of the roads on SE 106th, 108th and 110th Finishing construction of SE Cooper Street Finishing creek bank improvements Creating an overflow creek channel to access the wetlands in the southwest corner of the site Removing an additional 18,200 cubic yards of material Constructing a pedestrian bridge near the present SE 106th Avenue and creating a trail from Foster Road to the new SE Cooper Street where it ends at SE 108th Planting the site with native trees and vegetation beginning this fall and continuing into spring 2013 If you see dumping at the project site, please call the Portland Police Bureau non-emergency number, 503-823-3333. For more information visit our web site at: http://www.portlandonline.com/bes/EastLents
The Johnson Creek Watershed Council’s “Volunteer Project in the Pleasant Valley Neighborhood” was on Saturday, October 20, 2012 at the Pleasant Valley Grange. Kelley Creek, a Johnson Creek tributary winds around the Grange property. Twenty five volunteers attended the three hour blackberry removal event. The trees we aimed to save that day were planted at the Pleasant Valley Grange six years ago and they looked tall and healthy, except for the blackberry brambles that had begun to take over. The volunteers eradicated the blackberry from the one entire side of the land bordering Kelley Creek on the Grange property. These hard workers dug up over two pick-up truck sized loads of blackberry brambles. Three volunteers donned waders to remove trash dumped directly into the water too. One pick-up truck load of garbage was removed from the creek; noteworthy items included several tires and a toilet. Special thanks to all the JCWC volunteers who contributed to this EPAP-funded effort!
In Spring and Fall programs, Wisdom of the Elders Native American interns worked in the Johnson Creek Watershed to provide habitat restoration activities. They worked alongside JCWC's professional staff to learn new skills and knowledge about these natural areas.
NA.2. 2 Advance Powell Butte wildfire protection.
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NA.2. 3 Eradicate invasive plant species in public and natural areas.
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Volunteers are continuing to remove invasive species within the bounds of Leach Botanical Garden. Upcoming in April we will have school children from Gresham removing invasive species for Earth Day.
The Powellhurst-Gilbert Neighborhood Association has an ongoing major restoration project along the Springwater Corridor between SE 128th and SE 136th. The project includes the removal of invasive species, most notably ivy and blackberries, along the Corridor. Several ivy pulls have already taken place.
Volunteers from Deloitte spent a day clearing invasive species at Leach Botanical Garden. Leach Garden Volunteers continue to work weekly on removal of invasive species. Leach Garden staff continue to assess the status of plants within the Garden. The new Leach Garden Collection Assessment recommended removal of some species with invasive tendencies.
As part of PP&R's "No Ivy Day 2011", Friends of Gateway Green (FoGG) organized a work party on the Gateway Green site to remove invasive species, with a focus on English Ivy. Another work party was held on March 24, 2012 -- again to remove English Ivy.
The Johnson Creek Watershed Council’s “Volunteer Project in the Pleasant Valley Neighborhood” was on Saturday, October 20, 2012 at the Pleasant Valley Grange. Kelley Creek, a Johnson Creek tributary winds around the Grange property. Twenty five volunteers attended the three hour blackberry removal event. The trees we aimed to save that day were planted at the Pleasant Valley Grange six years ago and they looked tall and healthy, except for the blackberry brambles that had begun to take over. The volunteers eradicated the blackberry from the one entire side of the land bordering Kelley Creek on the Grange property. These hard workers dug up over two pick-up truck sized loads of blackberry brambles. Three volunteers donned waders to remove trash dumped directly into the water too. One pick-up truck load of garbage was removed from the creek; noteworthy items included several tires and a toilet. Special thanks to all the JCWC volunteers who contributed to this EPAP-funded effort!

NA.3 Increase public access to natural areas

NA.3. 1 Create passive recreation development standards that are sensitive to habitat needs and seek to minimize impacts to neighboring residents.
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NA.3. 2 Develop opportunities for increased public access to BES/City-owned properties for passive recreation.
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Update for Audubon Society of Portland ROSE Explorador Summer Camp. This summer with the help of East Portland Action Plan, the Audubon Society of Portland delivered camp to 24 residents in the Rose CDC community. Rose Explorador served a total of three Rose sites in the Powellhurst-Gilbert and Foster-Powell neighborhoods with outdoor education. With the help of local partners like Zenger Farm and the Lower Columbia River Estuary Partnership (LCREP), Explorador participants were able to engage with their local green spaces in unique ways. At Zenger Farm, campers explored this local working farm and participated in a service learning program helping to rid the farm of some weeds. Campers also had the opportunity to canoe on the Willamette River, exploring by water, the intersection where nature meets the city. In an effort to build a continuing relationship with the Rose community, the Explorador program hosted a family event this past spring participating in Metro's Raptor Road Trip on Sauvie Island. This event was wildly successful as we had a total of close to 50 people join us on this outing. The families had the opportunity to explore the island and learn about different hawks, eagles, owls and falcons that live around Portland. Portland Audubon continues to provide environmental education to a section of Portland that is often overlooked, helping to better achieve environmental equity throughout East Portland.
On June 27th we rallied more than 60 people from Lent School, the Lent Neighborhood and various partner organizations to remove almost 2800sf of asphalt from the Lent School site. Despite a near 100° forecast we started early and had everything done within 5 hours. An overcast morning and plenty of water helped. The PTA sponsored lunch. This community event is the start of creating an amphitheatre on the site that will be used as an outdoor classroom, play space for older kids and a gathering opportunity for the community.
The site of the Malden Court Community Orchard (7677 SE 87th Ave) is a formerly neglected lot owned by the City, and previously inaccessible to the public. The City of Portland entered into a lease with local non-profit Green Lents, so that the lot could be transformed into publicly accessible green space offering passive recreation opportunities. With support from an EPAP General Grant, a newly constructed open air gazebo has replaced an impenetrable mass of invasive blackberries. Now the public can enjoy a mixed-canopy, edible woodland natural area.
Through Outgrowing Hunger's EPAP-funded New Portlander Civic Engagement through Garden Advocacy project, refugee community members were able to successfully advocate to City officials for the opening of a previously fenced-off, vacant Parks property at SE 150th & Division for use as a community garden. Because of this effort and positive use, full public access is being considered while park planning and development are in process.
NA.3. 3 Purchase land in the Lava Domes area to begin "Forest Park East."
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NA.3. 4 Support Zenger Farm outreach and wetland restoration programs.
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We addressed goal NA.3.4 by incorporating a field trip to the Farm for Springwater Commons’ children and youth. The participants toured Zenger Farm and learned from staff about sustainable gardening and healthy eating. NHA also coordinated with Zenger Farm to present at Springwater this fall about how to buy and prepare healthy foods on a budget.
Zenger Farm’s Community Chef Project, conducted with partial funding by an EPAP 2014 general grant, provided training and support to members of immigrant and ethnic communities to lead demonstrations and workshops celebrating their cultural food traditions. These events were held at neighborhood locations including schools, parks and farmers markets and provided an opportunity to share information about Zenger Farm with a wider audience. Six Community Chefs, representing 5 countries of origin, gained leadership skills and knowledge to promote Zenger Farm and healthy eating resources in the neighborhood. The project reached more than 1200 community members through demonstrations and 200 through workshops.
Wisdom of the Elders created a community-based habitat restoration project with interns and landscape professionals creating a master plan for native species and First Foods in a 50 ft. buffer between the wetlands and the garden area at Zenger Farm. In the spring, interns prepared the soil using a sheet mulching. In the fall, interns planted 500 trees, shrubs and plants.
NA.3. 5 Develop and implement East Portland natural areas public education program to increase awareness and use (where appropriate).
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NA.4 Attain environmental equity in East Portland

NA.4. 1 Increase active and passive recreation space on par with citywide recreation space and best practices standards.
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Leach Botanical Garden Business Plan includes values which support better active and passive recreation in the historic Garden grounds as well as in design elements to be included as the Upper Garden plans go forward.
Audubon Society of Portland ROSE Explorador Summer Camp. This summer with the help of East Portland Action Plan, the Audubon Society of Portland delivered camp to 24 residents in the Rose CDC community. Rose Explorador served a total of three Rose sites in the Powellhurst-Gilbert and Foster-Powell neighborhoods with outdoor education. With the help of local partners like Zenger Farm and the Lower Columbia River Estuary Partnership (LCREP), Explorador participants were able to engage with their local green spaces in unique ways. At Zenger Farm, campers explored this local working farm and participated in a service learning program helping to rid the farm of some weeds. Campers also had the opportunity to canoe on the Willamette River, exploring by water, the intersection where nature meets the city. In an effort to build a continuing relationship with the Rose community, the Explorador program hosted a family event this past spring participating in Metro's Raptor Road Trip on Sauvie Island. This event was wildly successful as we had a total of close to 50 people join us on this outing. The families had the opportunity to explore the island and learn about different hawks, eagles, owls and falcons that live around Portland. Portland Audubon continues to provide environmental education to a section of Portland that is often overlooked, helping to better achieve environmental equity throughout East Portland.
The Malden Court Community Orchard, located at 7677 SE 87th Avenue, is a new publicly accessible green space offering passive recreation opportunities. With support from an EPAP General Grant, Green Lents and Portland YouthBuilders constructed an open air gazebo on the site. This gathering space is attracting residents to enjoy nature observation in an environmentally sustainable food forest.
NA.4. 2 Require incorporation of environmental sustainability practices for all projects receiving public funding.
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In July 2013, Wisdom of the Elders, Inc. (Wisdom) piloted our first Summer Field Science Camp for 20 Native American and other underserved youths from NAYA. The camp included an afternoon of service learning at Wisdom Gardens with about 40 participants from the summer camp (20), including PSU Capstone (10-15), NAYA (3), Wisdom (3), Ecotrust (2), and Metro (1). Participants amended soil, pulled and removed sod and invasive plant species, and planted 12 blueberry plants, 30 strawberry starts and 80 camas bulbs on site. In July 2014, we held our second Summer Field Science Camp for 16 Native American youth from NAYA. Students completed service learning at Wisdom Gardens two afternoons, removing invasive Himalaya blackberry roots, Morning Glory and English ivy and planted a woodland understory bed with, 10 ferns, 4 bearberry, 2 snowberries, 1 twinberry, and 2 chokecherry trees. Students also learned about rain gardens and bio-swales and how they protect our watershed. They helped to build a rain garden with three rain barrels, and planted camas bulbs, 4 prairie blankets, and 4 sledge rushes. They helped to plant our upper bio-swale by adding 7 salmon berry plants.