SN.1 Assist in stabilizing low income residents/families

SN.1. 1 Increase energy assistance for low income residents in East Portland.
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In Fall 2009 The Energy Assistance (EA) program moved to a paperless application submission process, reducing the turnaround time for energy payments to utilities and freeing up staff time at Energy Assistance agencies. EA staff have also increased their outreach efforts, both through the mail and via site-based outreach days, to ensure that residents are aware of this valuable resource.
Home Forward helps fund and administers the county-wide STRA program (Short Term Rent Assistance). STRA can be used for utility assistance if necessary to support stable housing.
SN.1. 2 Pilot a rent assistance program to assist families to remain in one home throughout the school year.
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The School Housing Stabilization Fund (SHSF), funded through the Short Term Rent Assistance Program, provides short-term rent assistance and other flexible client assistance to prevent homelessness and rapidly re-house homeless families in high-poverty schools throughout Multnomah County. Rent assistance funding is closely coordinated with leveraged case management services through the Multnomah County SUN Schools program and through community-based anti-poverty providers to increase housing and school enrollment stability and improve student performance. Eight of the participating schools are in East Portland. Between July 1, 2009, and October 1, 2010, 108 families received rent and other assistance through SHSF in those eight East Portland Schools, with direct client assistance totaling $351,928.
Home Forward is piloting a rent assistance program along with case management for families at Alder Elementary. The only entire school in the nation to be designated as a "Dreamer" school by the I Have a Dream Foundation, students at the school experience a high degree of homelessness and housing instability. Alder Elementary is part of the Reynolds School Dist6rict and is located between Portland and Rockwood, just outside the Rosewood Initiative boundaries.
Portland Housing Bureau continues to fund the School Stabilization Fund through our partner Home Forward.
SN.1. 3 Expand the Lents Homeownership Initiative model to all of East Portland: stakeholder-driven, marketing campaign, community leadership.
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SN.1. 4 Increase funding and outreach for home maintenance assistance to low income homeowners.
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In fiscal year 2009/10 which ended June 30, 2010, the Portland Housing Bureau (PHB) provided three home repair loans for a total of $71,810 to low income homeowners in the Lents Town Center Urban Renewal Area. Currently, PHB has funding to help approximately 15 homeowners in the Lents Town Center Urban Renewal Area through its Home Repair Loan Program. The program helps low and moderate income home owners make critical repairs to their homes. Homeowners can borrow up to $15,000. The loan program doesn’t require monthly payments or charge interest. At the beginning of the 11th year of the loan, 20 percent of the loan will be forgiven. After the 15th year, the loan will be completely forgiven. The loan is a 0.00% deferred payment loan.
SN.1. 5 Develop new and expand existing weatherization grants program to fund energy efficiency upgrades in exchange for guaranteed rents.
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Energy Services is currently engaged in the safety net regarding providing energy efficiently upgrades and maintaining low-income rents. Multiple grant sources are being used to provide energy efficiency upgrades on a number of addresses in the east part of the County.
Community Energy Project provides free small-scale weatherization services to low-income seniors and people with disabilities in the Lents Urban Renewal Area. Clients do not have to be a homeowner! visit www.communityenergyproject.org or call 503.284.6827 for details.
SN.1. 6 Support safe, convenient, and cost-effective childcare throughout East Portland.
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Our Environmental Health Program inspects and licenses childcare centers in Multnomah County.
Participants in the Bridges to Housing program have access to childcare funds that allow parents to work, participate in job training, seek counseling or otherwise improve their family's situation. Specifically, the Broadway Vantage building, which was developed in partnership with the County, includes on-site childcare for residents.
SN.1. 7 Increase services for single, homeless adults in East Portland.
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SN.2 Support diversity in neighborhoods

SN.2. 1 Increase sustainable homeownership for moderate income households.
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Over the past year, funding from the Portland Housing Bureau (PHB) has helped support two for-sale housing developments for low and moderate income first-time buyers. Nine homes were built on SE 97th Ave. near Foster Rd by Habitat for Humanity Portland Metro East. All nine homes have been purchased by household earning at or below 60% median family income. Ten homes were built at SE 122nd and Pardee in the Powellhurst-Gilbert neighborhood and sold to moderate-income first-time buyers through Proud Ground. All ten homes have been sold. PHB funding and oversight not only ensures quality construction, but also that the buyers receive right-sized financing that will ensure sustainable, long-term ownership and opportunities to invest in their homes and the community.
Home Forward (fka Housing Authority of Portland)is not a direct provider of homeownership services. However, we have partnered with Habitat for Humanity and other first-time homebuyer programs to make homeownership available to qualified buyers by providing buildable land in proximity to Home Forward development projects.
Portland Housing Bureau provided funding to Svaboda Court, a 12 unit homeownership project by Proud Ground. Each home was sold to a buyer earning less than 80% of the area median income. Proud Ground homeowners typically earning between $25,000 and $45,000 per year. You can find more information at http://svabodacourt.org/
SN.2. 2 Increase opportunities for minority homeownership.
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Portland Housing Bureau Awards $1.37 Million to Local Nonprofits Providing Homeownership Programs http://www.portlandonline.com/phb/index.cfm?c=52439&a=318179

SN.3 Increase support for independent elderly and disabled people

SN.3. 1 Create a good neighbor program through block captains, tailored to reach out to elderly and disabled residents.
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SN.3. 2 Provide funding assistance for seniors to make energy efficiency upgrades.
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Energy Services is currently engaged in the safety net regarding providing energy efficiently upgrades and maintaining low-income rents. Multiple grant sources are being used to provide energy efficiency upgrades on a number of addresses in the east part of the County.

SN.4 Establish "resident activities coordinators" at multi-family dwellings

SN.4. 1 Institute policy requiring ongoing provision of coordinator for publicly-financed housing properties.
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SN.4. 2 Develop mechanism to require or provide incentives for the hiring of a coordinator at existing multi-family housing, public and private.
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SN.4. 3 Develop recreation and interaction activities for younger multi-family housing residents.
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The Rosewood Initiative is creating community space at SE 162nd Ave and Stark that will be open to all community members, young and old. We partner with organizations such as the Mayor's Office of Youth Violence Prevention, Morpheus Youth Project and Generations United in Action to host youth specific events at Rosewood.
Northwest Housing Alternatives has the Springwater Commons Learning Garden up and running and is engaging youth of all ages. Youth are practicing environmental stewardship, gardening and making healthy food choices while they care for tomatoes, peas, lettuce, radishes, and onions. We've also visited Zenger Farms and the Leech Botanical Garden to supplement our programming.
Outgrowing Hunger's 2014 EPAP General Grant funded the continuing expansion and development of community gardens in high-density areas of East Portland. We have observed that many families with young children use the gardens as both a food production, recreation, and social gathering place for 3 or more generations of their family at the same time.
The Association of Slavic Immigrants US 2015 "Slavic Culture Festival" worked with "Young Journalists" who were local high school students guided by 3 adults who work with Slavic Family magazine and Afisha radio. Over a 4-month period the youth interviewed Russian-language business owners, transport drivers, health care and social workers, apartment complex residents, mothers of large families, and teachers of their schools. The materials were published by Afisha magazine and Our Family newspaper. The festival helps to identify new young leaders and provides them with an opportunity to try their hands in doing new things and strengthen their friendships. Many of the youth come from multi-family housing.

SN.5 Provide life skills training and education opportunities for East Portland residents

SN.5. 1 Institute the Portland Police Bureau's Project Clean Slate in East Portland and fund on an on-going basis.
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SN.5. 2 Develop an outreach program to parents to educate them on their rights to advocate for their children.
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LLC Latino Learning Community les explico que el proposito de la paternidad es proteger y preparar a nuestros hijos para sobrevivir y prosperar en el tipo de sociedad en el que ellos viven.
LLC Latino Learning Community contacto a NorthWest Family Services,una organizacion encargada de dar las charlas.Y asi trabajamos en conjunto. Claudia Carrillo se encargo de los permisos pertinentes con la Principal de la Escuela Primaria Shaver, para invitar a los padres de familia.y asi involucrar a los padres de nuestra area de East Portland.
ROSE CDC organized weekly community conversations in Spanish that lasted 9 weeks in the spring of 2015. Club RC worked with Latino Network, Portland Community College, Hacienda CDC, Multnomah County Health Department, Community Alliance of Tenants, Zenger Farms, Yarosh/Valdez Immigration Attorneys, a parenting class with a local therapist, and El Programa Hispano. Classes were intended to facilitate conversation, education and empowerment to Spanish-speaking families in East Portland.
SN.5. 3 Expand availability of English language learning and civics education classes for parents.
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The first EPAP/SOAR Legal Bilingual Spanish-English Citizenship class was offered from January 7th through March 11th 2014. It was held in Northeast Portland at St. Matthew’s Episcopal Church located at 11229 NE Prescott St, Portland, OR 97220. Three students and one Pastor attended the classes, even though he was already a citizen. Although the class is not overwhelming with students, each individual is receiving a generous amount of practice and knowledge in preparation for a Naturalization Interview and U.S. History and Civics exam.
Our second installment of the EPAP/SOAR Legal Bilingual Spanish-English Citizenship classes was offered from February 12th through April 16th 2014. It was held in Southeast Portland at the Multnomah County Library Midland Branch located at 805 SE 122nd Ave. Portland, OR 97233. This time there were 15 students whom worked tirelessly to prepare for the Naturalization process. This class was so popular we became very creative in our seating arrangements in order to fit everyone into our classroom!
Student Story: Micaela and Raul were two students in the second EPAP /SOAR Legal Bilingual Spanish-English Citizenship class held at the Multnomah County Library Midland Branch. They are an elderly married couple and approached me right away during their first day in class to inform me that obtaining their Citizenship to the United States was very important to them. Although many people say this to me, it wasn’t until two weeks later that I learned that Micaela and Raul were both suffering from some medical problems. They explained to me that these medical problems made it difficult for them to study and to learn English, but regardless they would continue to attend the class and that they would do their best to learn. After informing them that there existed a Medical Certification for Disabilities Exemptions form that could be filled out, they became very hopeful that they would be able to succeed in their goal of attaining Citizenship. Although Micaela and Raul decided to attempt to obtain a Medical Exemption, they continued to attend each class and worked diligently keeping up with the course load. They approached the class as they have approached work all of their lives, with all of their heart and with all of their effort. Through conversations I learned that they were seeking to obtain Citizenship to this country in order to obtain better jobs and thus better health care. Their conditions require more intensive medical attention and they felt that by becoming citizens they will be able to better their social status along with their immigration status. I was moved deeply by their intention, their work ethic, and by how virtuous they both were during our time together. Micaela and Raul are good, hard working people that merit all of the security and benefits that should be given to those who have spent a majority of their lives working and paying taxes in this country.
LLC Latino Learning Community Trabajo con los temas de mayor interes que se tocaron en esta ocacion fueron, Familias exitosas, Padres activos, Metas lejgitimas para los hijos, entre otros
ROSE CDC organized weekly parent education classes as part of our Club RC soccer program, offering presentations from local organizations about important civic engagement topics. Presentations from local non-profits that provide english language learning and civics education include Latino Network, Portland Community College, Hacienda CDC, Multnomah County Health Department, Community Alliance of Tenants, Zenger Farms, Yarosh/Valdez Immigration Attorneys, and El Programa Hispano.

SN.6 Promote healthy communities in East Portland

SN.6. 1 Use Health Impact Assessments to evaluate and mitigate impacts of the built environment on public health in East Portland.
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In 2012, the Community Alliance of Tenants (CAT) worked with the Oregon Public Health Institute (OPHI) and other partners to conduct and publish a Health Impact Assessment around the Portland Rental Housing Inspection Program. The HIA looked at the "enhanced" inspections pilot program in outer SE neighborhoods. These neighborhoods see a higher concentration of substandard rental housing and can affect the health and safety of tenants. The HIA found that the enhanced inspections lead to higher health outcomes for tenants. The enhnaces inspections work by triggering mandatory inspections of a building when multiple inspections are requested, This practice protects tenants because it is more difficult for a landlord to retaliate against a single tenant when it is unclear who made the initial inspections request. The HIA includes a number of recommendations to improve and expand the enhanced inspections program, and today CAT and tenant leaders use these recommendations in our advocacy for East Portland tenants (see HD 2.2). Click the link for the HIA Executive Summary: http://ophi.org/download/PDF/RHIP%20HIA_Exec_Sum_web(2).pdf
SN.6. 2 Increase information about health clinics in East Portland.
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We are creating a map of east county County health clinics and WIC sites marked along with the Coalition of Community Health Clinic locations between 80th and 180th. The map will be added when completed.
ROSE CDC invited the Multnomah County Health Department to present at our Club RC parent education series at kelly elementary in the Spring of 2015.
SN.6. 3 Expand participation in schools/parks Summer Lunch Program.
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Zenger Farm’s Community Chef Project, conducted with partial funding by an EPAP 2014 general grant, conducted a bilingual English/Russian cooking demonstration as part of the Summer Lunch programming at Lynch View School in July 2014. Fifteen adults and fifteen youth participated in the demonstration, which provided an opportunity for the school to promote its summer lunch programming.