CB.1 Increase interaction among cultural communities and geographic neighborhoods

CB.1. 1 Promote block parties and develop a block party kit that can be distributed to existing organizations, neighborhoods and community events.
Add new update

Updates

Crime Prevention Begins at Home program invited Powellhurst-Gilbert Neighborhood Association to let program participants know how they can become involved in their neighborhood association life and events, such as block parties and movie in the park.
ONI and EPNO work with PBOT to process block party applications. However additional support has not been prioritized by ONI's BAC or EPNO community leadership as a priority for funding.
Division Midway Alliance's (DMA's) Art on the Box project resulted in a permanent mural on a utility box located at the SW corner of SE 122nd and Division. Three David Douglas School District youth artists were chosen for the project. Two of the artists are from immigrant backgrounds and their community perspectives are reflected in the mural.
CB.1. 2 Engage ethnic communities in neighborhood activities; provide translation/language services to remove barriers; improve messaging and invitations.
Add new update

Updates

We addressed goal CB.12 through our "Subotnik" project, by rallying all community members for event participation via numerous flyer campaigns, posters, and door to door recruitment. Potential language and cultural barriers were addressed by utilizing existing and community resources to provide culturally competent support. The Springwater community boasts a wide representation of nations, ethnicities and cultural backgrounds. Families from Ukraine, Russia, Latin American countries, and the Middle East participated. This project was also multigenerational; ages ranged from pre-school children to middle aged parents, aunts and uncles.
The third annual East Portland Exposition was held July 23 and 24 of 2011. Through support from the East Portland Action Plan, the event has successfully evolved into the largest multicultural event in Portland. In 2011, the event included 22 cultural performances, 6 multicultural Villages, mostly culturally inspired foods, exhibitors, and inflatables for kids. The event was also held in conjunction with Movies in the Park and included a movie each night. Attendance over the two days, including the movies each night, is estimated to be approximately 6,000 people.
Participants in the Building Cultural Bridges video project participated in the Friends of Trees community project, attended the Bhutanese civic education classes' graduation ceremony, and interviewed city leaders like Amanda Fritz. The youth group that learned video skills was pulled from two different geographical locations, and traveled around Portland to film sections of the film, which encouraged new relationships amongst people and places. The final project, which is in Nepali and English, will also provide access to information about services in Portland in a visual format, which helps break down information barriers.
This garden has brought to gathered a number of communities in the neighborhood such as Vida Abundant Fellowship (Hispanic congregation), Oromo Church (Ethiopian congregation), David's Harp (adult mental health day center). Each of these communities have taken part in the garden.
Crime Prevention Begins at Home program provided Civic Engagement event for Russian-speaking community on the 14th of April of 2012. Presenters from the city of Portland, New Portlanders Office and Human Right and Equity were present to let community know what resources and assistance they can get to have equal opportunities. Since all presentations were interpreted into Russian, the audience could clearly communicate with the presenters and ask important questions. Presenters from East Portland Action Plan impressed participants and inspired them to invest their time in community building and neighborhood livability.
Russian Speaking Network is preparing Children Stresses classes for Russian-speaking community. We are recruiting actively people for this program. We did advertising on Radio 7 in air.
Several neighborhood events have significant engagement of diverse ethnic communities such as the East Expo multicultural event. Several event announcements have been translated. ONI funds five community of color, immigrant, refugee organizations, (Diversity and Civic Leadership Program), most of which are increasingly engaged in outer East community organizing and leadership development. East Portland Aciton Plan established a Civic Engagement Subcommittee that focuses on support and development of language and culturally-specific community involvement. EPAP provides interpretation, translation, and childcare upon request for all EPAP meetings, community functions, public testimony, and advocacy with Commissioners and Councilors. EPAP often uses phone interpretation to communicate effectively with EPAP members. The EPAP grants programs have funded several ethnic community projects and built partnerships between these communities and neighborhoods. EPAP Civic Engagement Subcommittee members have provided guidance and have partnered on inclusivity from Sunday Parkways to Gateway Celebrations to mobile playground program development to successfully advocating for multilingual distribution of student health clinic brochures through East Portland schools.
Last night was Outgrowing Hunger's kick-off party to register new gardeners through the East Portland Neighborhood Gardens program, which was sponsored in part through the 2013 EPAP Grants program. This project has resulted in ethnic Nepali, Zomi (Burmese) Russian, and Latino families in the Centennial neighborhood becoming active participants in community-building through gardening. We are now in the process of hiring youth interns from these ethnic groups to assist in leveraging social networks within these communities to improve communication for this and other neighborhood activities and resources. For more information call Adam at 971-231-4191 or visit our website.
EPAP Funded Parkrose Music Boosters encouraged the engagement of ethnic community members by providing limited-English-speaking family members the opportunity to attend and participate in musical performances of their children without extensive verbal communication required.
Outgrowing Hunger's Neighborhoods Community Garden, in partnership with the EPAP general grants program and many others, is now engaging 65 Bhutanese refugee families, 8 Burmese, and 6 Lao families with an active community-oriented project. 10 youths from refugee communities have participated in a paid internship program through the CWSP grant program, getting involved and actively contributing to their communities. Several celebratory and capacity-building events were held and interpreted through community-based resources, which has helped to develop cohesion and relationship among otherwise isolated community members. The communication structures facilitated by the project are also improving access to mental health, emergency food, and other needed resources.
At the 2013 East Portland Slavic Festival, THE ESTIMATED TOTAL, ACCORDING TO INDEPENDENT REPRESENTATIVES, THE FESTIVAL HOSTED OVER 2000 PEOPLE DURING THE DAY. The festival day began early in the morning for the vendors who displayed their merchandise in their tents for visitors. At 10 am, the concert began and lasted till 6 pm. Singers, dancers, musicians and music bands performed on the stage for eight hours. Representatives from different places performed at the festival: Belarus, Ukraine, Russia, performing artists came from Florida, North Carolina, and Washington State. Various languages could be heard at the festival: English, Ukrainian, and Belarusian. Tents with European food attracted visitors to the park from 8 am to 8 pm. One could taste Uzbek pilaf, shish kebab, piroshky, tea and coffee. During the theatrical performance one could taste honey, the freshest honey in the comb from the Slavic apiary. The festival ended at 8 pm, but people didn't hurry to leave, the volleyball matches continued, fans continued to cheer on the players. On that day, visitors to the park could get to know the specifics of Slavic lifestyle, their songs and dances, their favourite games, their favourite dishes that are used to welcome guests to the Russian-speaking families. In its turn, the Slavic community could see the friendliness of urban organizations that participated in the preparation and organization of the festival, such as EPAP, EPNO, Woodland Park Association, and the help of individuals in the preparation and organization of the Slavic Festival. В 2013 году на Славянском фестивале побывали БОЛЕЕ 2000.0 ЧЕЛОВЕК В ТЕЧЕНИЕ ДНЯ. Фестивальный день начался рано утром для вендоров, которые выставляли свои палатки для посетителей, в 10 часов утра начался концерт , продолжавшийся до 6 часов вечера. 8 часов на сцене выступали певцы, танцоры, музыканты и музыкальные группы. Выступали представители разных мест: Беларуссии, Украины, России , приехали артисты из Флориды, Северной Каролины, штата Вашингтон .Звучали разные языки: английский, украинский, белорусский. Палатки с европейской едой привлекали посетителей парка с 8 утра и до 8 вечера. Можно было попробовать узбекский плов, шашлык, пирожки и чай ,кофе.В театрализованном представлении можно было попробовать мед, свежайший мед в сотах из славянской пасеки. Закончился фестиваль в 8 часов вечера, но люди не спешили расходиться, продолжались игры по волейболу, болельщики продолжали болеть.. Посетители парка могли в этот день познакомиться с особенностями жизни славян ,их песнями и танцами ,их любимыми играми, их любимыми блюдами, которыми встречают гостей с русскоговорящих семьях. В свою очередь, славяне увидели дружеское расположение городских организаций, помощь в подготовке и проведении фестиваля EPAP, EPNO, Woodland park Association и помощь отдельных людей в подготовке и проведении Славянского Фестиваля.
An East Portland Action Plan grant with Ecology Outdoors through the Lent Elementary Native Habitat Project engaged Lent students and their families, Lent "Garden and Outdoor Education Space" partners and volunteers, and neighbors. Throughout the year, the Lent Garden Committee held multiple Community Work Parties, during evening and weekends, when stakeholders were invited to improve their community by weeding, mulching and planting within the garden. Invitations, in multiple languages, were sent home with students and events were advertised on the reader board outside the school. The project also incorporated a Community Celebration of Earth Day. This event drew approximately 200 people to the Lent Garden and Outdoor Space. During the event, a new mural was unveiled, food from the garden was served, as well as cake. This event was again advertised by multi-language invitations sent home with students, and information posted on the school reader board.
The Community Alliance of Tenants (CAT) worked with a variety of communities, doing a variety of activities in East Portland from July 1st, 2013 - Dec. 31st, 2014. All of our efforts prioritized engaging tenants that reflect the following communities: low-income, immigrants and refugees, disabled, people of color, and families with small children. We organized tenants in two buildings, with over 80% of the participants (over 80 households) from the Asian immigrant/refugee communities. The communities included Burmese, Bhutanese, Nepali, Thai, Zomi and Karen languages, nationalities, and identities. One of the buildings we organized renters spoke 12 different languages, and another building renters spoke 5 languages. CAT provided language and interpretation services, culturally humble activities and communications. We door knocked 53 units between the two buildings, one building 10 renters the other building 43 renters. Renters at both buildings sent collective repair request letters to their landlord, and asked the Neighborhood Inspections Program to inspect their buildings. In the first building, all 10 units were inspected by the Neighborhood Inspections Program, in the second building 13 units were inspected. All repairs were eventually made. Some other tenant’s issues, such as fair housing came up. We supported renters in both buildings to seek legal support for fair housing education and evaluation. Renters' Rights Workshops: 1. CAT conducted 1 renters’ rights workshop in East Portland in July of 2013. CAT specially targeted the Latino community for the workshop. Since the need for renters’ right info is in high demand in East Portland, community members got the word out. We did not want to turn people away from the event. As we knew of language needs we secured translation for those community members. We ended up having 5 languages represented- English, Spanish, Burmese, Nepali, Karen. Over 65 participants attended the event. We provided food, childcare, and translation at this event. 2. Our second Renters Rights workshop, in January 2014 had a Healthy Homes focus. The workshop was at the apartment complex, where there is a large Burmese community. 20 participants discussed their rights and responsibilities, as related to the habitability and health conditions inside their homes. 3. Our third Renters’ Rights workshop was held in March of 2014. CAT targeted the Spanish-speaking community for the workshop. We invited East Portland Neighborhood Office and the Fair Housing Council of Oregon participated.
Portland Fruit Tree Project held information tables at 19 community events and resource fairs in East Portland from July 1, 2014 through June 30, 2015, reaching approximately 570 individuals and families. Our goal was to engage our target populations (low-income families and/or Hispanics/Latinos) in harvesting events and other community-serving programs. We provided materials translated into Spanish. We also began a website translation project to make our services more accessible to Spanish-speakers.
Russian Speaking Network (RSN) completed its Crime Prevention Begins at Home project 2014-2015: The first workshop, Identify a Crime and Understanding Measure 11 and Communicating with Police, was held on November 1, 2014. The presenter, Chris Ramras, Multnomah County Senior Deputy District Attorney, talked about (1) types of crimes in Oregon, such as violations, misdemeanors, and felonies; (2) criminal justice system; (3) Measure 11. In surveys that we had our participants to fill out, almost all participants stated that they would like to hear that information again and share this with others and that realizing consequences was eye opening and preventive for them. Many participants had no or very limited and false information about Measure 11 and types of crimes, which is worth to be aware of for parents with teenagers to prevent crime. The cheat sheet of Measure 11 Mandatory Minimum Sentencing was valuable tool that visibly demonstrated the way people get punishments. The second presenter was Irene Konev, Independent Police Review Community Outreach Coordinator. People were excited to get to know that there are ways to keep the Portland Police accountable. Irene started the presentation with the best tips on how to communicate with Police. There were many questions raised during Irene’s presentation, especially about when Police stops you on the street and how to ask Police for help on the street. Irene was very open, friendly, and knowledgeable. She explained the Police hierarchy structure, Police Process, and how to become a Police man/woman. Two participants filled out the form to say thank you for Officers who helped them. None of the participants knew about the Independent Police Review Division and what it does. They were also impressed by the fact that the Community Outreach Coordinator of this Division is bilingual in Russian and English. Presenters and participants appreciated the opportunity to communicate with each other openly, build “bridge of trust”, and understand that calling the police is OK even in non-emergency cases. The second workshop, Gangs and Gang Involvement Prevention, Domestic Violence, Child Abuse, and Innocent Images was held on December 6, 2014. Presenters: Tom Peavey, Policy Manager of the Office of Youth Violence; Robert Blake, Gang Outreach Specialist from Portland Opportunities Industrialization Center; Tatiana McGinley from Russian Oregon Social Services (ROSS); Charles Dodsworth, FBI Special Agent. Gang prevention team covered the following topics: Description of the Street Level Gang Outreach Program, Signs of Gang Involvement in Youth, Why youth join gangs, Prevention Strategies for Parents, and How to communicate with Adolescents who are involved with gangs. In surveys our parents-participants stated that information about gangs’ prevention was crucial and absolutely new to them. The number of gangs present in the area and how easily teenagers can get involved shocked most of parents. This should help parents to be more attentive to their children behavior and habits. Tatiana McGinley provided description of Domestic Violence and Child Abuse, American Family Law, and resources for domestic violence victims. Agent Dodsworth did the presentation “Innocent Images”. The presentation was about social media, its negative effect on lives of our youth. Almost 90% of our participants stated in their surveys, that this information was extremely important for them to learn.
Zenger Farm’s Community Chef Project, partially funded by an EPAP 2014 general grant, provided training and support to members of immigrant and ethnic communities to lead demonstrations and workshops celebrating their cultural food traditions. Community Chefs built leadership skills and became stronger advocates for health in their communities. Community Chefs supported other community members to access and prepare healthy, affordable, and culturally relevant meals to nourish their families and communities. Through cross-cultural sharing, the project strengthened community relationships, built cultural identity and pride and created a more inclusive community. Cooking together was an especially effective way to include newcomers in community life and a powerful way to build a strong community. The project supported six Community Chefs to lead 16 cooking demonstrations and 11 cooking workshops. These events were held at Lents International Farmers Market, Zenger Farm, Parkrose Farmers Market, Parkrose United Church of Christ, and at several schools and community events including Neighborhood Night Out. Community Chefs represented multiple countries of origin including Mexico, El Salvador, Russia, the Philippines and Bhutan. All of the chefs were awarded $50 stipends for each event they led and four of the six chefs attended a cooking & nutrition leadership training. Community Chefs engaged more than 200 community members in workshops and more than 1200 community members in demonstrations in 2014.
The EPAP 2014 General Grant helped provide staff time for 2 major Jade District planning processes for the Jade District Community Vision and the Powell Division High Capacity Transit Project. In conjunction with the Jade District Visioning in the summer of 2014, we hosted 5 workshops in Cantonese, Vietnamese, Russian, Spanish, and English at the Jade District offices within the EPAP boundaries. Each workshop had around 10-15 participants. The final visioning with all community members had around 200 attendees and took place at Bridger Elementary. This project engaged our local residents and business community and has served as the basis for our current advocacy. Our community prioritized 1) improvements to the 82nd/Division Intersection 2) Walkability and Safety 3) need for community center and 4) need for green/open space. This process was done by first recruiting community leaders within the target communities to convene a diverse range of participants from their own networks that crossed age, gender identification, and socioeconomic status. Please see http://www.jadedistrict.org/About.html for links to all the plans and concept art from the visioning. We met or exceeded our final products proposed in our grant proposal. We continued the use of these funds for multi-lingual visioning for a Community Forum regarding the Powell Division BRT line on February 28th at Fubonn, which is also within the EPAP boundaries. This event brought 100 community members and was done in English, Cantonese, and Vietnamese. This event showed overwhelming support for having the BRT line up and down 82nd as long as there were strong policies in place to prevent displacement of the community. This was an extremely important piece of information and is helping inform the Metro planning process for route alignment, station placement, and protecting our local businesses. Please see http://www.oregonmetro.gov/public-projects/powell-division-transit-and-development-project for the project documents, including the Public Engagement Report, which highlights our work. These two projects addressed removing barriers to full community input (CB.1.2) and help to attain parity with other parts of the city in capital spending (EQ.1.4, EQ.3.2). Both these processes also helped us build new leadership within the organization by pulling in property owners and diverse members of the neighborhood to become more active members of the Jade District community. These events also helped us build stronger relationships with government agencies at the Bureau of Transportation, Housing Bureau, Bureau of Planning and Sustainability, Trimet, and Metro. One win has already been the Metro owned property at the corner of 82nd and Division was has been turned over to the Jade District for temporary community use. We also expect traffic safety improvements to be done in the coming years, including safety improvements at the 82nd and Division intersection to be done in 2016.
CAT successfully led a project in which 25 East Portland tenant leaders designed and led two educational fair housing and renters’ rights social-media campaign projects for 200+ residents. The project encouraged the participation of the following languages, minority and protected-class communities: Latino, Russian, Karen, Nepali, Bhutanese, Burmese, African American (did we?), low-income and families with small children, and worked with more than 10 East Portland organizations. CAT conducted 3 Fair Housing and Renters Rights workshops, with a total of 46 low-income tenants attending each, with multiple language interpretation resources available. Workshops also incorporated civic engagement and leadership-development of the “My Vision for Fair Housing is…” and “Renter State of Emergency” campaigns, for the purpose of learning their rights as renters, how to advocate for fair housing, and advocacy against displacement and evictions, tenant education in East Portland, and other needed community resources, such as safe routes to school and enhanced rental housing inspections. • With PSU students and tenant leaders, CAT developed the “My vision for Fair Housing Is...” social media campaign. We trained tenant leaders about the many facets of Fair Housing law, and how it can benefit their communities, if properly enforced. Tenant leaders from the LOVES group were given cameras to take photos of their neighbors and community, holding the “Fair Housing Is…” placard that included personal messages of what fair housing and diversity means to them. Over 25 East Portland tenants have taken photos for the campaign and photos from the campaign will be featured in the Portland Housing Bureau’s Fair Housing Assessment, due to be completed and released in 2016. • CAT, tenant leaders and community partners engaged volunteers and tenants in the #RenterStateofEmergency campaign, dedicated to talking about rent-hikes and evictions as fair housing issues. Tenant leaders gathered stories and to photos of 185 tenants/families with the #RenterSOS placards. 70% were immigrants and refugees under 30% MFI with 12 volunteers. • We have already received a fair amount of earned media, over a dozen local, national, and international articles and TV news segments, regarding evictions, rent increases and displacement. Cristina Palacios, participated in KBOO interview regarding housing issues in East Portland. • CAT worked with the Fair Housing Council of Oregon to organize one fair housing workshop for East Portland tenants. The workshop included a fair housing training for tenants, and a coloring contest for kids for FHCO’s “Fair Housing Month” poster in April.
The Lents Street Fair focused on extensive outreach to engage ethnic communities, including some collaboration with the Slavic festival, to materials translated into various languages, and invitations to participate in the St. Fair or attend with their families. There were many vendors representing some of the neighborhood's ethnic diversity as well as participation in the parade.
With the support of our 2014 EPAP General Grant, Outgrowing Hunger was able to improve the civic engagement and neighborhood involvement of underserved ethnic communities by: 1) Conducting a Russian Garden Class series (4 total) in partnership with Slavic Youth Program and EMSWCD, serving approximately 12 Russian-Speaking families. 2) Holding multi-ethnic community events: Salsa Party Sept 21st (approx 65 attendees), Garden Registration Potluck Jan 27th (approx 70 attendees), and Spring Celebration (June 7th, appox 75 attendees). At each event, people from Burmese, Bhutanese, Lao, and Latino households prepared traditional foods to share with each other. 3) We registered 88 households representing 288 people as active gardeners in 2014, and 108 households (mostly returning) as active garden participants in 2015. Of these, 105 were non-white, and non-English speaking households, primarily Bhutanese or Burmese refugees, followed in number by Latino, Mien, and Somali households. Of the total 381 members of households registered for the garden there were 271 adults and 110 children. Participation in the garden project resulted in strengthened connections with other families within and between ethnic communities, exposed participants to democratic decision making processes, and served as a venue for training community members on outreach, advocacy, and peer leadership skills. In addition, the community building and advocacy momentum generated through this project not only resulted in new partnerships with Lincoln Park Elementary and the City of Portland Parks and Rec Department, but also attracted over $30,000 in matching funds during the '14-'15 fiscal year, and another $65,000 for the '15-'16 fiscal year.
With tenant leaders, the Community Alliance of Tenants (CAT) conducted focus groups and leadership trainings surrounding Latino visions for fair housing and campaign training regarding the #MyVisionforFairHousingIs social media campaign. The group met to discuss fair housing issues they were experiencing in their neighborhoods, then conducted popular education trainings on how to share that story in a Fair Housing social media campaign, designed to raise awareness to the general public. Over 30 participants were involved all of Latino origin and 30% MFI. This project engaged over 40 tenant leaders and volunteers. CAT also held a Spanish-language focus group, to help our translation of the “Don’t Get Evicted” Comic Book. The comic book was an illustrated educational publication, which educates its readers to understand what their rights are when faced with an eviction, and the connection between Fair Housing and evictions. All 12 participants were Spanish speaking, and helped the artist of the comic book modify the language of the comic book to be culturally accessible to Spanish speakers. The participants left the training feeling more educated about their rights around fair housing and evictions, and feeling empowered about their contributions to the project to ensure that it best serves their communities. The Spanish version of the comic book will be published in 2016.
Grow Portland's Floyd Light Community Garden provides an opportunity for low-income, immigrant and refugee families to participate in land stewardship and growing health food in East Portland. The garden construction was completed in spring of 2015, and we found a high demand for plots, especially among a network of Slavic families living adjacent to the garden. The demographics of the garden participants are approximately 90% immigrant and refugee families.
Portland Fruit Tree Project launched an effort to increase our outreach to Spanish speakers in east Portland and other communities. This initiative included translating materials, creating a Spanish language webpage, online event registration in Spanish, person to person outreach serving Latino families, coordinating two harvest events in Spanish, and translating program forms into Spanish.
The Association of Slavic Immigrants US 2015 "Slavic Culture Festival" organized people providing flyers in the Russian language. We had people on our organizing committee who speak Ukrainan, Georgian, Russian, and English. These members of our organizing committee spoke with their language-specific community members in their first language to tell them about and invite them to participate in the various aspects of the festival: sports, performances, vendor opportunities, and celebration of Slavic Cultures. We also did weekly presentations on the local Russian language radio station: Slavic Family.
Division Midway Alliance (DMA's) Art on the Box project resulted in a permanent mural on a utility box located at the SW corner of SE 122nd and Division. Three David Douglas School District youth artists were chosen for the project. Two of the artists are from immigrant backgrounds and their community perspectives are reflected in the mural.
APANO will organize East Portland Asian and Pacific Islander youth to take leadership on the development and production of a mural to be at an East Portland location, the youth group collectively created a vision for what the mural could look like, and two youth leaders volunteered to sketch a drawing to bring back to the group for feedback, and edited the draft based on the feedback. The youth then sketched the mural on the wall and created a work schedule so all youth can participate in painting and creating the mural. The actual mural is a mixed-media project that consists of both painting on the wall and photos that of various youth in the community with the goal of creating visibility and uplifting the voices of those who are often marginalized in our communities.
The recently formed partnerships between Free Arts NW and Powellhurst-Gilbert Neighborhood Association allowed for inclusive opportunities and engagement in the development and creation of public art, including the new mural on SE 136th south of Holgate.
From May 2015 through October 2016, Outgrowing Hungers EPAP-funded New Portlander Civic Engagement Through Garden Advocacy project worked with members of Bhutanese and Burmese refugee communities living in the Centennial Neighborhood to work with City officials to coordinate and build a new community garden at the PP&R 150th & Division property. The purpose of this project was to teach underserved communities about engaging with public processes and initiating advocacy for the purpose of improving their own quality of life. This began when 25 refugee community members attended a parks planning meeting at the EPNO office in order to inform Commissioner Amanda Fritz about their need for additional garden space in East Portland. The result of this project was that the 150th park was given high priority for master planning, a temporary garden was allowed to be established until park development occurred, and over 200 refugee community members were able to participate in the master planning process- for many their first engagement with providing input to a formal public process. EPAP funds allowed the hiring of refugee youth to conduct in-language outreach for the project, and assist elderly or pre-literate ethnic community members in participating in the Parks Master Planning meetings.
Actions to be Taken by Grantee Reporting  Community Alliance of Tenants engaged over 321 (221 specific to EPAP funding) East Portland tenants in civic engagement opportunities ranging from providing feedback on fair-housing related issues and their experiences of housing to the city, to engaging in intersectional housing discussions regarding transportation and housing concerns, to Anti-Displacement PDX’s community hearings and events, to engaging in a dynamic, intensive leadership development cohort strengthening their leadership around utilizing their experiences for storytelling purposes to engage in systemic change efforts. East Portland tenants also attended the #JustCauseBecause campaign kick-off and housing community hearing where tenants were able to share their experiences with legislative champions advocating for rent-stabilization and just-cause evictions protections. Participants were African-American, Native American, Spanish speaking, Somali, Russian, Burmese, Karen, Nepalese, Vietnamese, White, and others.  19 - 25 tenants engaged in 6 storytelling and leadership development trainings/sessions to develop their leadership and advocacy in skill-building opportunities at Earl Boyles Elementary School. Leveraged dollars were allocated to support East Portland tenants then engaging in CAT’s Tenant Leadership Council where tenants had a chance to use their developed storytelling and policy analysis skills. Tenants had a chance to weigh in on statewide policy development for the 2017 legislative session around Just Cause evictions and rent-stabilization, local efforts to enact Just Cause Protections in the City of Portland, and help launch a Community Based Participatory Research project designed to investigate and report the effects of evictions on most-impacted populations. Participants are from multiple communities including African American, Latinx, Vietnamese, White, Native American, and Russian.  3 tenants participated in the planning of a graduation and Housing Fair to celebrate the end of the storytelling, leadership development cohort, connect tenants to local housing stakeholders, and kick-off into engaging in other tenant advocacy opportunities.  6 tenants are participating in hosting a renter’s gathering in East Portland in January 2017 specifically to share their experiences of no-cause evictions and rent-increases. EPAP funding is not supporting this event.  Due to the size of EPAP’s award and a lack of leveraged resources awarded (an affordable housing initiative grant from a local foundation); EPAP dollars could not support a multi-day, multi-cultural Renter’s Assembly. The costs for multi-day translation services, transportation support, volunteer incentives, staff time and fringe benefits, operational costs to support the planning of this event are significantly higher than the award, and the execution of this event depended on these leveraged dollars that were not awarded to CAT.  Due to the denial of leveraged funding opportunities that we were vying for at the time we applied for this grant, EPAP Civic Engagement Grant was only able to pay for the storytelling/leadership development trainings before funds were spent in September. A replacement multi-day Renter’s Assembly will have to be scaled down to a one-day renter’s gathering set to be held in January of 2017 that EPAP funds will not support due to the end of the grant period and complete expenditure of funds.  4 media pieces (3 videos from East Portland leadership development produced, and 1 video surrounded around Just Cause Evictions which has been published on our website (www.oregoncat.org, www.stablehomesor.org, and our Facebook page) were produced to draw positive attention to East Portland and encourage local electeds to begin implementing Rent-Stabilization and Just Cause policies following the legislative session. This was successful in that the City of Portland has begun implementing Tenant Protections work in the Portland Housing Bureau including a substantial budget allocation in the 17-18 budgets for Tenant Protections measures (inspections mandates, landlord registration, just-cause eviction standards, rent-stabilization measures, and fair-housing concerns regarding screening). Mayor Wheeler has begun crafting Just Cause and Rent-Stabilization measures with a group of tenant leaders and advocates that will be accomplished within his first 100 days. It was also successful in helping to push the statewide legislative agenda for lifting the ban on rent-stabilization and implementing statewide just-cause protections. Evaluation Narrative This project was immensely successful in developing the storytelling leadership capacity of our project participants. Through an intensive storytelling workshop/leadership development cohort tenants learned the importance of telling their story in ways that affect systemic change. They then were coached and attended multiple events with us to tell their stories, ranging from media pieces, to rallies in Salem, to attending city hearings around Anti-Displacement, to video storytelling projects and beyond; utilizing their storytelling of displacement to help fuel the momentum seen behind efforts of addressing the housing crisis in East Portland and statewide. Tenants have also engaged in long-term opportunities to continue building their storytelling skills and leadership skills to address housing inequality and intersectional issues of transportation, economic development and more in East Portland. This promotes the health and well-being of tenants by developing their leadership in a capacity that encourages self-advocacy and further civic engagement in issues and decisions that affect their lives for generations to come, ultimately building collective power to help implement long-term systemic change.
For the Parkrose Heights Association of Neighbors Hazelwood Hydropark Kiosk planning events, our hand-delivered flyer to the surrounding neighborhood was translated into Spanish, Russian and Vietnamese. Future postings at the kiosk will be in multiple languages.
Morpheus Youth Project (MYP) offered an audio production workshop in East Portland at 2 locations. Youth from a variety of different ethnic backgrounds and who spoke different languages at home attended the program. Although flyers were distributed in English, high school / middle school staff helped to interpret at school locations that the flyers were distributed. Those who attended spoke English as well as home languages and were proficient in both, so interpreters were available but weren't necessary for the program.
CB.1. 3 Create an annual event to celebrate the ethnic cultures of East Portland.
Add new update

Updates

The East Portland Exposition is an annual event in the Powellhurst-Gilbert Neighborhood designed to promote East Portland with an emphasis on multiculturalism and children and families. The event will conduct its third event in 2011. The event includes culturally-inspired performances and interactive activities. It has quickly become the largest multicultural event in the City of Portland.
The 2011 East Portland Exposition will be on July 23 and 24. Gates open at 11:00 a.m. For more information go to the event Internet site at www.epoxpo.org.
The third annual East Portland Exposition was held July 23 and 24 of 2011. Through support from the East Portland Action Plan, the event has successfully evolved into the largest multicultural event in Portland. In 2011, the event included 22 cultural performances, 6 multicultural Villages, mostly culturally inspired foods, exhibitors, and inflatables for kids. The event was also held in conjunction with Movies in the Park and included a movie each night. Attendance over the two days, including the movies each night, is estimated to be approximately 6,000 people.
Done- youth participated in tabling during the East Portland Exposition Event
The Iraqi community participated actively in East Portland Expo. It was a great achievement of the project, because it was the first time for Iraqi residents of Portland to participate in such a culturally diverse event and meet and share activities with other communities of East Portland. Also, on December 4, we had a graduation dinner for Iraqi Society of Oregon’s “Social Adjustment and Integration of Iraqi Population in East Portland” workshops series. A dinner for about 50 people including the Iraqis and American friends went off without a flaw. City Commissioner Amanda Fritz, accompanied by Hazelwood NA Chairman Arlene Kimura, and Parks & Rec’s Outreach staff Alejandro Vidales. Comm Fritz handed completion certificates to some very proud New Portlanders.
Russian-speaking participants of Crime Prevention Begins at Home program were informed about Annual East Portland Expo XPO from past years. we encourage all participants to attend this event in July 2012. They will learn more about culture of other neighbors and local businesses.
The fourth annual East Portland Exposition (EPO XPO) was held July 21, 2012. EPO XPO is now the largest multicultural event in the city of Portland. This year, the event venue was changed to Earl Boyles Park and was reduced to one day. The event featured live cultural performances, culturally-inspired Villages with educational and interactive activities, exhibitors, and mostly culturally-inspired food.
EPNO and EPAP provided significant grant, resource, and staff supported coalition-wide multi-cultural event, East Portland Exposition, for 3 years. EPNO is now supporting neighborhood-scale events with ethnic components rather than single annual event.
At the 2013 East Portland Slavic Festival, THE ESTIMATED TOTAL, ACCORDING TO INDEPENDENT REPRESENTATIVES, THE FESTIVAL HOSTED OVER 2000 PEOPLE DURING THE DAY. The festival day began early in the morning for the vendors who displayed their merchandise in their tents for visitors. At 10 am, the concert began and lasted till 6 pm. Singers, dancers, musicians and music bands performed on the stage for eight hours. Representatives from different places performed at the festival: Belarus, Ukraine, Russia, performing artists came from Florida, North Carolina, and Washington State. Various languages could be heard at the festival: English, Ukrainian, and Belarusian. Tents with European food attracted visitors to the park from 8 am to 8 pm. One could taste Uzbek pilaf, shish kebab, piroshky, tea and coffee. During the theatrical performance one could taste honey, the freshest honey in the comb from the Slavic apiary. The festival ended at 8 pm, but people didn't hurry to leave, the volleyball matches continued, fans continued to cheer on the players. On that day, visitors to the park could get to know the specifics of Slavic lifestyle, their songs and dances, their favourite games, their favourite dishes that are used to welcome guests to the Russian-speaking families. In its turn, the Slavic community could see the friendliness of urban organizations that participated in the preparation and organization of the festival, such as EPAP, EPNO, Woodland Park Association, and the help of individuals in the preparation and organization of the Slavic Festival. В 2013 году на Славянском фестивале побывали БОЛЕЕ 2000.0 ЧЕЛОВЕК В ТЕЧЕНИЕ ДНЯ. Фестивальный день начался рано утром для вендоров, которые выставляли свои палатки для посетителей, в 10 часов утра начался концерт , продолжавшийся до 6 часов вечера. 8 часов на сцене выступали певцы, танцоры, музыканты и музыкальные группы. Выступали представители разных мест: Беларуссии, Украины, России , приехали артисты из Флориды, Северной Каролины, штата Вашингтон .Звучали разные языки: английский, украинский, белорусский. Палатки с европейской едой привлекали посетителей парка с 8 утра и до 8 вечера. Можно было попробовать узбекский плов, шашлык, пирожки и чай ,кофе.В театрализованном представлении можно было попробовать мед, свежайший мед в сотах из славянской пасеки. Закончился фестиваль в 8 часов вечера, но люди не спешили расходиться, продолжались игры по волейболу, болельщики продолжали болеть.. Посетители парка могли в этот день познакомиться с особенностями жизни славян ,их песнями и танцами ,их любимыми играми, их любимыми блюдами, которыми встречают гостей с русскоговорящих семьях. В свою очередь, славяне увидели дружеское расположение городских организаций, помощь в подготовке и проведении фестиваля EPAP, EPNO, Woodland park Association и помощь отдельных людей в подготовке и проведении Славянского Фестиваля.
Wisdom Gardens was started as a holistic approach to improve health and wellness of Portland’s Native community whose health issues and poor diets stem from limited access to fresh fruits and vegetables. We demonstrated that we can improve physical and mental health and wellness by reconnecting Native people to nature and their food systems. We provided vegetable garden space as well as training for Native families to improve our community’s knowledge and access to nutritional foods. In 2013, seven Native families were given individual 4’x8’ raised beds to garden at Kelly Butte. May to Sep 2013, these families logged 73.5 combined hours, averaging 60 minutes of garden work per week. We supported four additional gardeners with plant starts for their own home gardens, training and mentoring, workshops and work parties. We provided germination trays of organic heirloom vegetables to other Native nonprofits with gardens, including the Siletz Tribe and NAYA. We had a total of 1500+ volunteer hours between May 2013 and November 2014, including AmeriCorps, Portland State University and Lewis and Clark College students that helped construct additional raised beds and other garden structures and to help maintain the site. Since 2013, we have produced 2000+ pounds of produce, donated approximately 900 pounds of produce to NAYA’s food pantry and two other East Portland food pantries and 1000 vegetable starts to Native American organization and individuals. Wisdom held a volunteer dinner for out AmeriCorp team on May 23, 2013. Approximately 25-30 people attend the volunteer dinner and ethnobotanical garden open house. Activities included a ceremony, garden tours and honoring of individual volunteers, especially the AmeriCorp National Community Conservation Corps team and landscape architect Lora Price who supervised their work. At our September 2013 and 2014 fall harvest celebrations, approximately 50 people attended and enjoyed the harvest meal and elderberry syrup making demonstration.
The Association of Slavic Immigrants US 2015 "Slavic Culture Festival" organized people providing flyers in the Russian language. We had people on our organizing committee who speak Ukrainan, Georgian, Russian, and English. These members of our organizing committee spoke with their language-specific community members in their first language to tell them about and invite them to participate in the various aspects of the festival: sports, performances, vendor opportunities, and celebration of Slavic Cultures. We also did weekly presentations on the local Russian language radio station: Slavic Family.The day started with sporting events. Forty five young athletes prepared the show that was on during the whole day with several breaks for performances by singers, children, representatives of mass media and guests of the festival. At noon, it started raining heavily, the wind was penetrating through guests' warm clothes. But the most courageous performers continued their shows on the stage! Kids of 3-5 years of age brilliantly performed their dances under the rain. Some singers, bundled up in warm clothes, continued singing. Rain didn't scared away the group of clowns, they kept cheering up the guests of the festival. Unfortunately, some of the athletic performances had to be shortened since their mats were soaking wet. It was pouring for about two hours. But when the rain stopped the great amount of people filled up the park. The stream of people entering the park continued till 10:30 pm. Meals were sold in the amount of 5200 portions at the festival. Two barrels of kvas beverage from Seattle were sold at the festival. One thousand portions of fine chocolate were sold with great hot high quality tea prepared by one of our vendors. About 150 people could "take a bath" in a chocolate fountain. Eleven specially made cakes were eaten.
Iraqi Society of Oregon EPAP funded cultural event: a gathering for Iraqi and non Iraqi families gathering, that included cultural activities and food. A dialogue was conducted through round table groups to exchange their experiences of life in America. It also included presentations of Iraqi women hand crafts and food. July 30th 2:00PM to 5:00PM
CB.1. 4 Organize walking or biking tours through the area.
Add new update

Updates

This is a brief summary of our 2010 EPAPbike-sponsored rides: We had 12 riders for an April test ride in Hazelwood, Woodland Park, & Parkrose Heights; we had 9 riders for our May Planning Loop ride in Hazelwood, Glenfair, Wilkes, & Centennial; 16 for our June Art on I-205 MUP ride through Powellhurst-Gilbert, Lents, & Hazelwood; 9 for our August Parkrose Farmer's Market ride; 9 for our September Volcano ride through Powellhurst-Gilbert, Pleasant Valley, Lents, & Hazelwood; and 10 for the Sacred Spaces ride in October through Russell, Parkrose Heights, Hazelwood, (Maywood Park), Parkrose, Argay, & Wilkes; for a total of 65 participants for the 6 rides. We also had 65 riders for the co-sponsored Equity Ride in August through Hazelwood & Powellhurst-Gilbert. We plan on doing an additional ride in November. So far in 2010, we have had rides in all 13 East Portland neighborhoods, as well as Montevilla, the City of Maywood Park, and Wilkes-Gresham.
EPAPbike continues to have community bike rides, often with an educational theme, every two months, on average. We usually have 4-9 riders per ride. We advertise on our own list-serve of 114 members, as well as the S.H.I.F.T. blog and with PBOT Transportation Options. We also have "breakfast on the bridge" events at the Burnside 205 bridge twice a year, with 75+ cyclists passing through, and 30+ stopping to chat. We had 8 rides in 2011, 6 rides in 2012.
CB.1. 5 Provide full/additional resources for community organizing efforts that support ongoing community building and development work (including community small grants program).
Add new update

Updates

We have a gardener who grows tomatoes only. The gareden was over flowing with tomatoe plants. We were able to sell tomatoe plants at Gateway Area Business Association Fun~O~Rama. These plants where heirloom plants.
The garden supports the ongoing community development work of the church by bringing together church members, neighbors, hispanic church members, pre-school students and clientele of David's Harp both working in the garden and in the harvest dinner. It gives us a chance to meet each other and work together in a way we would not otherwise. It creates pride in the neighborhood. Neighbors who do not participate in the garden often stop to chat and ask questions about it.
* Maxaction provides safety vest for volunteers at many community events * Maxaction is working with Trimet to develop and implement an Adopt a Station program.
A manual for Culture Adjustment for refugees is provided in English and Arabic languages, which can be used for other communities. It is loaded on the website of the Iraqi Society of Oregon www.IQSOR.org.
Used EPAP grant funds to give all East Portland Neighborhood Association and EPAP websites the capability to add RSS feeds to their neighborhood web pages. The administrator has the ability to add feeds that are important to their projects and to give residents one website location to get local, relative East Portland news and updates.
Slavic Community Center held classes that taught how to pass a citizenship class, which involved lots of effort from the attendees. Having English as their second language, it was beneficial, as the students had told us themselves, that we had a teacher that was fluent in English and Russian languages. This really gave a boost for the students to be able to learn everything quicker and to be able to retain the information. During the class we also taught the importance of voting once they become citizens, also we explained the importance of selective services and most of all we encouraged them to be involved in the community projects and provide their useful cultural knowledge to enrich other people of Portland with their uniqueness and creativity. As the classes were coming to an end, students started begging us to not finish these classes with this, but to continue on next year. We had success stories right away, since a few of our students had to go and take citizenship test during the time that our classes were still going on. They passed the test and came back to class and encouraged other students that these classes helped them to pass since they did not pass before.
Russian Speaking Network completed the Crime Prevention Begins at Home Project on 4/14/12.This 6-workshop crime prevention and civic engagement educational program was designed specifically for Russian-Speaking community. With each workshop we reached the following four aims: (1) to raise the understanding, knowledge, and trust in the Russian-Speaking/Slavic community of local East Portland law enforcement and the American judicial system; (2) to train and motivate East Portland Russian-Speaking/Slavic community members to engage in crime prevention and law enforcement awareness activities in the East Portland neighborhoods where they live; (3) to expand the scope of involvement of the Russian-Speaking/Slavic community to prevent crime and improve livability in neighborhoods with a high concentration of our community; (4) and to prepare graduates for the next step of civic engagement and demonstrate the way of involvement in the East Portland Action Plan.
EPAP grant funding supported an AmeriCorps Community Organizer trained in Asset Based Community Development to focus within a specific East Portland neighborhood now known as Rosewood. Additional support for this position came from the Centennial Community Association President, the East Portland Neighborhood Office, staff of Second Stories, EPAP Advocate, Crime Prevention Specialists, The Rosewood Initiative Board, Portland Police, EPAP members, and community stakeholders in Rosewood. Time was spent in the neighborhood building relationships around what community members care about, their dreams, and projects they prioritized. This began with listening to individuals one-on-one, at meetings and in group gatherings. The organizer started a process of linking neighbors in ways that empower their ability to support each other, address concerns, and achieve shared goals. Neighbors started to identify, plan and implement "neighborhood bettering" activities. These are ongoing to date, and growing in scope and significance in terms of addressing broader community issues.
Grow Portland's Eastminster community garden was created in 2012 with help from the small grants program, and provides a platform for community building. Different nationalities and ethnicities work side by side, learn from each other and share successes (as well as nutritious food). In 2012, participation from a diversity of gardeners including those from the countries of Burma, Loas, Ukraine, Moldova and Somalia.
A 2012 EPAP grant partially funded a staff position at The Rosewood Initiative. Additional funding came through Portland Development Commission, Multnomah County and private donations. This position supports the efforts of The Rosewood Initiative to do ongoing community organizing and community development work in the area of SE 162nd Ave and Stark. During the grant period, we completed a community mural by supporting a local artist and community members, held community meetings with many partners, hosted youth events, and planned our community space to establish a place for the work to continue.
Neighborhood Small Grants, EPAP Grants, EPAP Civic Engagement Grants, and EPAP Projects provide limited resources to community organizations. EPAP assists with directing community members to other grant resources, offers to assist in grant proposal writing, accepts grant proposals in any language, and provides interpretation as requested. EPNO provides ongoing communication, leadership development, capacity building for neighborhood associations. EPAP Civic Engagement Subcommittee provides a forum where cultural and language-specific community members have made it their purpose to be available to work with neighborhoods to address inclusivity. East Portland Action Plan grants have funded several projects that include the commitment of cultural communities to work with and refer to Neighborhood Associations. EPAP has also facilitated partnerships between Neighborhood Associations anc cultural communities in grant submission.
Neighborhood Small Grants, EPAP Grants, EPAP Civic Engagement Grants, and EPAP Projects provide limited resources to community organizations. EPNO provides ongoing communication, leadership development, capacity building for neighborhood associations. EPAP has implementation differences between grant and project funding programs that serve to build community capacity at different stages. EPAP provides grant proposal assistance and project support. EPAP accepts grant proposals and evaluations in all languages and provides language interpretation and translation upon request.
At the 2013 East Portland Slavic Festival, THE ESTIMATED TOTAL, ACCORDING TO INDEPENDENT REPRESENTATIVES, THE FESTIVAL HOSTED OVER 2000 PEOPLE DURING THE DAY. The festival day began early in the morning for the vendors who displayed their merchandise in their tents for visitors. At 10 am, the concert began and lasted till 6 pm. Singers, dancers, musicians and music bands performed on the stage for eight hours. Representatives from different places performed at the festival: Belarus, Ukraine, Russia, performing artists came from Florida, North Carolina, and Washington State. Various languages could be heard at the festival: English, Ukrainian, and Belarusian. Tents with European food attracted visitors to the park from 8 am to 8 pm. One could taste Uzbek pilaf, shish kebab, piroshky, tea and coffee. During the theatrical performance one could taste honey, the freshest honey in the comb from the Slavic apiary. The festival ended at 8 pm, but people didn't hurry to leave, the volleyball matches continued, fans continued to cheer on the players. On that day, visitors to the park could get to know the specifics of Slavic lifestyle, their songs and dances, their favourite games, their favourite dishes that are used to welcome guests to the Russian-speaking families. In its turn, the Slavic community could see the friendliness of urban organizations that participated in the preparation and organization of the festival, such as EPAP, EPNO, Woodland Park Association, and the help of individuals in the preparation and organization of the Slavic Festival. В 2013 году на Славянском фестивале побывали БОЛЕЕ 2000.0 ЧЕЛОВЕК В ТЕЧЕНИЕ ДНЯ. Фестивальный день начался рано утром для вендоров, которые выставляли свои палатки для посетителей, в 10 часов утра начался концерт , продолжавшийся до 6 часов вечера. 8 часов на сцене выступали певцы, танцоры, музыканты и музыкальные группы. Выступали представители разных мест: Беларуссии, Украины, России , приехали артисты из Флориды, Северной Каролины, штата Вашингтон .Звучали разные языки: английский, украинский, белорусский. Палатки с европейской едой привлекали посетителей парка с 8 утра и до 8 вечера. Можно было попробовать узбекский плов, шашлык, пирожки и чай ,кофе.В театрализованном представлении можно было попробовать мед, свежайший мед в сотах из славянской пасеки. Закончился фестиваль в 8 часов вечера, но люди не спешили расходиться, продолжались игры по волейболу, болельщики продолжали болеть.. Посетители парка могли в этот день познакомиться с особенностями жизни славян ,их песнями и танцами ,их любимыми играми, их любимыми блюдами, которыми встречают гостей с русскоговорящих семьях. В свою очередь, славяне увидели дружеское расположение городских организаций, помощь в подготовке и проведении фестиваля EPAP, EPNO, Woodland park Association и помощь отдельных людей в подготовке и проведении Славянского Фестиваля.
The Community Alliance of Tenants, CAT, developed a new “Leadership Development” curriculum for emerging tenant leaders. Our first cohort, the LOVES, is a group of 8 Latino families - mostly mothers who speak little to no English. The 4-part series includes: Renters Rights, Fair Housing, Affordable Housing 101, Government 101, and How to Talk to Your Legislator and Advocate for Housing. A graduation and housing fair was held in June of 2015 at Rosewood Initiative, in celebration to support their efforts and education in developing their stories for effective grassroots lobbying efforts. The LOVES group has participated in a number of advocacy opportunities, and is helping to lead the Renter State of Emergency campaign in East Portland.
Actions to be Taken by Grantee Reporting  Community Alliance of Tenants engaged over 321 (221 specific to EPAP funding) East Portland tenants in civic engagement opportunities ranging from providing feedback on fair-housing related issues and their experiences of housing to the city, to engaging in intersectional housing discussions regarding transportation and housing concerns, to Anti-Displacement PDX’s community hearings and events, to engaging in a dynamic, intensive leadership development cohort strengthening their leadership around utilizing their experiences for storytelling purposes to engage in systemic change efforts. East Portland tenants also attended the #JustCauseBecause campaign kick-off and housing community hearing where tenants were able to share their experiences with legislative champions advocating for rent-stabilization and just-cause evictions protections. Participants were African-American, Native American, Spanish speaking, Somali, Russian, Burmese, Karen, Nepalese, Vietnamese, White, and others.  19 - 25 tenants engaged in 6 storytelling and leadership development trainings/sessions to develop their leadership and advocacy in skill-building opportunities at Earl Boyles Elementary School. Leveraged dollars were allocated to support East Portland tenants then engaging in CAT’s Tenant Leadership Council where tenants had a chance to use their developed storytelling and policy analysis skills. Tenants had a chance to weigh in on statewide policy development for the 2017 legislative session around Just Cause evictions and rent-stabilization, local efforts to enact Just Cause Protections in the City of Portland, and help launch a Community Based Participatory Research project designed to investigate and report the effects of evictions on most-impacted populations. Participants are from multiple communities including African American, Latinx, Vietnamese, White, Native American, and Russian.  3 tenants participated in the planning of a graduation and Housing Fair to celebrate the end of the storytelling, leadership development cohort, connect tenants to local housing stakeholders, and kick-off into engaging in other tenant advocacy opportunities.  6 tenants are participating in hosting a renter’s gathering in East Portland in January 2017 specifically to share their experiences of no-cause evictions and rent-increases. EPAP funding is not supporting this event.  Due to the size of EPAP’s award and a lack of leveraged resources awarded (an affordable housing initiative grant from a local foundation); EPAP dollars could not support a multi-day, multi-cultural Renter’s Assembly. The costs for multi-day translation services, transportation support, volunteer incentives, staff time and fringe benefits, operational costs to support the planning of this event are significantly higher than the award, and the execution of this event depended on these leveraged dollars that were not awarded to CAT.  Due to the denial of leveraged funding opportunities that we were vying for at the time we applied for this grant, EPAP Civic Engagement Grant was only able to pay for the storytelling/leadership development trainings before funds were spent in September. A replacement multi-day Renter’s Assembly will have to be scaled down to a one-day renter’s gathering set to be held in January of 2017 that EPAP funds will not support due to the end of the grant period and complete expenditure of funds.  4 media pieces (3 videos from East Portland leadership development produced, and 1 video surrounded around Just Cause Evictions which has been published on our website (www.oregoncat.org, www.stablehomesor.org, and our Facebook page) were produced to draw positive attention to East Portland and encourage local electeds to begin implementing Rent-Stabilization and Just Cause policies following the legislative session. This was successful in that the City of Portland has begun implementing Tenant Protections work in the Portland Housing Bureau including a substantial budget allocation in the 17-18 budgets for Tenant Protections measures (inspections mandates, landlord registration, just-cause eviction standards, rent-stabilization measures, and fair-housing concerns regarding screening). Mayor Wheeler has begun crafting Just Cause and Rent-Stabilization measures with a group of tenant leaders and advocates that will be accomplished within his first 100 days. It was also successful in helping to push the statewide legislative agenda for lifting the ban on rent-stabilization and implementing statewide just-cause protections. Evaluation Narrative This project was immensely successful in developing the storytelling leadership capacity of our project participants. Through an intensive storytelling workshop/leadership development cohort tenants learned the importance of telling their story in ways that affect systemic change. They then were coached and attended multiple events with us to tell their stories, ranging from media pieces, to rallies in Salem, to attending city hearings around Anti-Displacement, to video storytelling projects and beyond; utilizing their storytelling of displacement to help fuel the momentum seen behind efforts of addressing the housing crisis in East Portland and statewide. Tenants have also engaged in long-term opportunities to continue building their storytelling skills and leadership skills to address housing inequality and intersectional issues of transportation, economic development and more in East Portland. This promotes the health and well-being of tenants by developing their leadership in a capacity that encourages self-advocacy and further civic engagement in issues and decisions that affect their lives for generations to come, ultimately building collective power to help implement long-term systemic change.
The following activities were conducted according to the plan developed and implemented by the Iraqi Society of Oregon and support with funding from EPAP: 1- Life in America and the importance of financial role for women in the family and community and overview on the investment opportunities . Feb. 21st 10:00 AM to 1:00 PM 2- Business Development: 5 weeks series of workshops, which is considered one of the requirements for each individual to apply for the IDA; In these workshops the following topics were addressed : A. The roles of an entrepreneur. April 1st 10:00 AM to 1:00 PM B. Legal issues, entity selection, employment overview and local resource referrals April 15th 10:00 AM to 1:00 PM C. Budgeting, record keeping and financing your business. April 29th 10:00 AM to 1:00 PM D. Building new or revised business plan April 30th 05:00 PM to 7:00 PM E. understanding the target market, market research and advertising May 13th 10:00 AM to 1:00 PM 3- The Lawful Community: The workshop introduced problem solving techniques and conflict resolution in interpersonal and community relations. May 27th 10:00 AM to 1:00 PM
ROSE organized a Personal Development Program that served families living in ROSE affordable housing located in East Portland in January-March of 2017.

CB.2 Empower and engage East Portland residents and businesses in civic decision-making

CB.2. 1 Build ongoing East Portland Action Plan advocacy group to sustain action plan efforts over time.
Add new update

Updates

July 23, 24 Benedict Community Park EPOEXPO: Bernie Foster sponsored a booth promoting the Focus East Project and The Skanner Foundation. Aug 25 LENTS EQUITY BIKE RIDE - Bernie Foster Spoke about Focus East and upcoming events at the Equity Bike Ride. Aug 31 - Sept 15 The Skanner Foundation Offices Bernie Foster met with EAST PORTLAND community leaders to discuss upcoming FOCUS EAST events. "East Portland meets North Portland" is an added value event planned for October to promote FOCUS EAST events. Bernie stated that "The FOCUS EAST project has been very inspiring and motivating."
The FOCUS EAST project of The Skanner Foundation, funded by The City of Portland East Portland Action Plan announces its first event, GET READY, on Saturday August 4, 10:30 a.m. – 3:00 p.m. at the Midland Library Parking Lot, 805 SE 122nd Ave. Plan on a family affair with prizes, food, and community workshops. Meet up with your neighbors or meet new neighbors, it’s time to GET READY! Identifying community leaders in East Portland is the rationale behind FOCUS EAST. The event will provide a place for dialogue among community members and will focus on three prominent issues facing the community: Law enforcement; Health; and Employment. Three workshops on these issues will be offered at the GET READY event and are open to the public to attend. Those attending the workshops will be entered into a drawing to win a digital video recorder to support future community building efforts and to provide additional visibility to the community. For more information, please go to http://www.theskanner.com/article/Are-You-Ready-2012-07-02 Sponsored by the City of Portland East Portland Action Plan, The Skanner Foundation, Portland Parks and Recreation, Multnomah County, Highland Christian Center, Portland Prime, and the African American Alliance for Homeownership (AAAH).
STRENGTHENING COMMUNITY: FOCUS EAST The Skanner Foundation’s Project FOCUS EAST organized the event GET READY! at the Midland Library on SE 122nd Saturday August 4. Funded by the East Portland Action Plan and The Skanner Newsgroup, the project’s goal is to bring together African Americans in East Portland to discuss common issues of the community. The project focuses on three prevalent issues identified by the community: Economics; Crime Prevention; and Health. Workshops offered at the August 4 event were attended by a number of community members and vendors. Professionals in the fields of law enforcement, business, and health provided information and opportunity to converse and create relationships among attendees. African American individuals interested in leading additional activities that support communication are being identified to build an information infrastructure that will benefit residents of East Portland. The FOCUS EAST event was modeled after the successful African American Alliance for Homeownership’s (AAAH) annual outreach event supporting individuals interested in purchasing homes. Vendors representing the home buying industry are invited to present information at the free event. There are many give-a-ways, including food. Breakout workshops throughout the day provide additional information to attendees with follow-up opportunities to help individuals purchase homes. In 1998, the first AAAH event was attended by 150 prospective homebuyers; since then attendance has reached to over 500 annually. To read their success story, go to www.aaah.org Efforts will continue by the sponsors of FOCUS EAST to identify and engage African Americans living in East Portland who possess and exhibit a vested interested in improving the community through an annual event such as the FOCUS EAST event. Future activities for this project include identifying individuals who will attend a fall forum to discuss moving the project forward. 75 Copies of the recorded August 4 workshops will be provided to forum attendees. Interested in attending the upcoming fall forum? Call NPMTC and leave a message for Bernie Foster: 503-285-5555, ext. 521 or email npmtc@comcast.net
CB.2. 2 Host Elected Officials week or Leaders Forum in East Portland.
Add new update

Updates

This specific action not been prioritized by community leadership. However, other efforts have been utilized to reach decision-makers such as candidate forums, inviting elected officials to meetings and walking tours. EPAP developed and established an on-line Candidates Forum. The general monthly EPAP meeting typically includes participation from multiple elected officials, as equals at the table in EPAP information sharing and decision-making.
CB.2. 3 Develop and hold leadership and civic engagement classes/programs for East Portland citizens to build capacity for participating in lobbying, advocacy, board participation, partnerships, etc.
Add new update

Updates

The library has two priorities that speak to community building: • Resources for immigrants - Immigrants will have the information and resources they need to participate successfully in life in the United States; and • Facilitating civic engagement - Patrons will have access to resources that support, create opportunities for, and inspire participation in our community, as well as address issues of public concern. As part of meeting these priorities, the library offers a series of six citizenship classes where attendees: • Learn about the process of becoming a citizen • Prepare for the citizenship interview • Study United States history and government for the examination Midland library is hosting citizenship classes this fall and winter, with full enrollment expected (20-25 attendees). Another program is Intercambio/Language Exchange, is also offered at Midland. This program gives participants an opportunity to practice English or Spanish and help other learners in a friendly atmosphere. Participants speak half the time in English and half in Spanish. Pageturners, the library’s monthly book group program, is offered at every library location. These groups engage in stimulating conversation about books, exchange perspectives about characters and plot, and get to know their neighbors. Pageturners is sponsored by the Friends of the Library. Everybody Reads, the library’s annual community-wide reading project, asks the question, “What if everybody read the same book?” with the goal that we'd talk to each other about issues that matter and we'd celebrate the power of books in creating a stronger community. The Everybody Reads 2011 selection is The Other Wes Moore by Wes Moore, the story of two kids with the same name and similar backgrounds but very different destinies. While one went on to become a Rhodes scholar, decorated combat veteran, White House Fellow, and business leader, the other is serving a life sentence in prison. The author asks "How did this happen?" and explores the impact of personal choices and the influences of environment and community on today's youth. The library’s meeting rooms are available to public groups and individuals for meetings and programs that serve an educational, cultural, civic or recreational purpose. Meetings and programs held in library meeting rooms must be free, open and of potential interest to the general public.
A Project of East Portland Action Plan Dialogue with the Latino community and U.S Attorney for the District of Oregon Dwight Holton: Meeting Notes Leadership Academy Workshop Guest Presenters: U.S Attorney for the District of Oregon, Mr. Dwight Holton Victim-Witness Unit, Gerri Badden Federal Bureau of Investigation Special Agent, Mario Galindo Wednesday, July 20, 2011 4:00 - 5:30 p.m. East Portland Neighborhood Office 1017 NE 117th Ave. Portland, OR 97220 Light Refreshments, Spanish/English Translation and Childcare Provided Agenda 4:00 Welcome by Cynthia Gomez, Program Director of Civic Engagement and Leadership Programs 4:05 Introductions and Dinamica/Icebreaker 4:20 Guest Presenters & Dialogue 5:00 Q & A 5:20 Closing Activity and Dinamica/Icebreaker Notes Mr. Dwight Holton spoke about the Criminal and Civil Rights divisions in his office. His agency works at the federal level with large-scale prosecutions such as fraud, white-collar crime, environmental violations, identity theft, hate crimes, and violators of civil rights. Community was encouraged to communicate with police first. If there are doubts, community members can always call US Attorney office for details and clarification. Mr. Holton also spoke briefly about the current effort to research alleged violations committed by the Portland Police Bureau. Mr. Mario Galindo spoke about the FBI. There is a Adult and Youth Academy (see below), partners with Victim-Witness unit, and offered himself as an advocate and contact. Mrs. Gerri Badden spoke about her office. They provide information about the court system, are present at the crime scene, works closely with FBI, collaborates and refers community to services, tracks down attorneys and others who are in the system, have materials in Spanish and Spanish speaking staff. Open Discussion Community members had doubts and questions about how immigration status affects access to these services. Mr. Holton made it clear that he is working closely with Secure Communities to ensure that those who are deported are those with prior convictions, deportations and offences. He receives reports that show that there are an insignificant number of immigrants who are deported who do not fit the aforementioned description. Community members also asked about “redadas” or round ups where if in search of specific offenders, others with no prior convictions are also deported. He is open to continuing the discussion. Actions Items • Anti-Bullying Curriculum: Information will be provided by Mr. Holton’s office. Test run was completed at Irvington School with teachers, parents and students. Run by Mrs. Holton. • FBI Adult and Youth Academy: A program for emerging and established leaders, this is an opportunity for community to learn their rights and how to advocate. This is a free federal service. Holly, through Mario’s office is the contact. • Substance Abuse Commission: Claudia (ALL alumni) was asked to provide feedback to the commission as they are seeking voices that can speak to the issues. • Community Relations Service: Information available about this service that addresses racial tensions. Currently working in Umatilla with White and Native Indian community members. • Opportunity to improve Crime Reporting: Mr. Holton expressed an interest in moving forward with an initiative to improve services. Partners identified: U.S Attorney’s office, Oregon Commission on Hispanic Affairs, and Latino Network. • Univision: Hilda (ALL alumni) is interested in having Mr. Galindo on Univision (Spanish Language TV) to share information about the FBI. • Courtroom Tours: Mr. Holton offered to host a tour of the courthouse. Jackeline, LN Program staff, has ideas to work this into the ALL curriculum. • Portland Police Bureau Investigation: The US Attorney’s office if conducting an investigation of violations by the PPB to see if there are systemic problems that lead to these violations. He seeks the communities assistance. Latino Network has access to this information and may assist in distributing the reporting opportunities to the larger community. See below for copy of e-mail correspondence: As you are aware, on June 8, 2011, the United States Department of Justice (Department) opened a civil investigation into allegations of use of excessive force by members of the Portland Police Bureau (PPB), in accordance with the pattern or practice provision of the Violent Crime Control and Law Enforcement Act of 1994. As you may have seen in the press release announcing the investigation, throughout the course of the investigation, the Department will seek to determine whether there are systemic violations of the Constitution or federal law by officers of the PPB. The Justice Department will consider all relevant information, particularly the efforts that Portland has undertaken to ensure compliance with federal law. The Department has taken similar steps involving a variety of state and local law enforcement agencies, both large and small, in jurisdictions such as New York, Ohio, New Jersey, Pennsylvania, the District of Columbia, Louisiana and California. As we discussed, the United States Attorney’s Office for the District of Oregon in conjunction with the Special Litigation Section of the Department’s Civil Rights Division will be conducting interviews at all levels of PPB, the city, and the community, during the first week in August. We also discussed that the Department wants to include individual community members, including those who live on the outer east side who have had interactions with PPB, whether good, bad, or indifferent. We request any assistance the Latino Network can provide in helping to reach out to community members to participate in individual interviews. Contact the U.S. Attorney’s local Civil Rights Hotline at either 503-471-5577 or by email at usaor.civilrights@usdoj.gov. Members of the public who do not desire an individual meeting, or for whom we are unable to meet with individually may also provide any information about PPB that they would like to share by emailing community.portland@usdoj.gov or by calling 1-877-218-5228.
Report Back Summer Seminar | Seminarios del Verano East Portland Action Plan 2011 Guest Presenters: Jobs with Justice Organizer, Mr. Marco Mejia United Way Diversity and Inclusion Director, Maria Rubio Friday-Saturday, August 12-13, 2011 6:00-8:00pm & 8:00am-3:00 p.m. East Portland Community Center & Pool 740 SE 106th Ave Portland, Or. 97216 Food, Transportation, Spanish/English Translation and Childcare Provided Agenda (8/12/11) 6:00-6:30 Welcome and Introduction: EPAP, ONI, NWHF and LatNet 6:00-7:50 Documentary: A Class Apart 7:50-8:10 Film discussion 8:10-8:15 Upcoming events 8:15-8:20 Closing remarks Agenda (8/13/11) 8:00-9:00 Breakfast 9:05-9:05 Welcome and Introduction: EPAP, ONI, NWHF and LatNet 9:05-9:15 Agenda Approval 9:15-10:00 Dinámica 10:-11:00 Workshop 1 w/ Marco Mejia:Community Organizing for all 11:05-12: Workshop 2: Introduction to leadership 12:00-1:0 Lunch 1:00-2:00 Workshop 3 with Maria Rubio: Our Regional Government 2:00-2:20 Next Steps and upcoming steps 2:20-2:50 Diplomas 2:50-3:00 Closing remarks Notes On August 12-13th, Latino Network conducted two seminars focused on civic engagement and leadership at the East Portland Community Center and Pool. Made possible through grants from the Office of Neighborhood Involvement, Northwest Health Foundation, and the East Portland Action Plan, the Summer Seminars series launched a new outreach effort in East Portland for Latino Network. With the growing presence of Latinos east Portland and recognizing the need for increased civic enagagement, the Latino Network developed this seminar to give Latinos leader the tools to be agents of change in their community. In addition, Latino Network developed a leadership curriculum for the children in attendance. On Friday (Aug 12) at 6pm, the first seminar kicked off with the screening of the documentary "A Class Apart". The film analyzed the historic achievement of a small group of Latino lawyers who took their case of institutional discrimination against Latinos to the Supreme Court in 1954. Seminar participants had a lively discussion on the progress made by Latinos in the U.S. since the landmark ruling and the challenges we still face. The following day, the participants returned at 8am for breakfast and to resume the dialogue on what constitutes being an effective leader. The first workshop was presented by Marco Mejia, an organizer with Jobs with Justice and a member of the New Sanctuary Movement. Marco talked about strategies and how to mobilize the grassroots community. Maria Rubio, the New Diversity and Inclusion Director of United Way, shared her knowledge of local, regional, and state governance with the participants. She explained the functions of the state legislature, the City of Portland, the jurisdictions of Counties, and the various agencies and bureaus--such as Metro, DHS, and PPS. The last portion of the time was dedicated to devising a plan for communication and working together on upcoming events and actions pertaining to immigration, health, education, and the build environment. In all, we had 22 folks attend the seminars. Latino Network couldn't have done it without the support of our partners and the community. The work is ongoing so keep an eye out in 2012 for our Summer Seminars in East Portland!
Asian Pacific American Network of Oregon's(APANO)held 6 workshops over the summer of June-August 2011 focusing on leadership development and youth empowerment in addressing cultural and social issues
The workshops covered the topics that were set by the project (Social Adjustment and Integration of Iraqi Population in East Portland) to provide refugees with basics of adjustment skills for Life in America. The workshops provided information and skills for self sufficiency, and the process of practicing rights and responsibilities. The workshops included orientation on DHS services, finance and tax issues, American culture and values, American law and law enforcement, and psychological trauma and paths to healing. Also, the workshops provided orientation on community organizing and role of civil activism in American system, and the meaning of diversity and inclusiveness.
Slavic Community Center held classes that taught how to pass a citizenship class, which involved lots of effort from the attendees. Having English as their second language, it was beneficial, as the students had told us themselves, that we had teacher that was fluent in English and Russian languages. This really gave a boost for the students to be able to learn everything quicker and to be able to retain the information. During the class we also taught the importance of voting once they become citizens, also we explained the importance of selective services and most of all we encouraged them to be involved in the community projects and provide their useful cultural knowledge to enrich other people of Portland with their uniqueness and creativity. As the classes were coming to an end, students started begging us to not finish these classes with this, but to continue on next year. We had success stories right away since few of our students had to go and take citizenship test during the time that our classes were still going on. They passed the test and came back to class and encouraged other students that these classes helped them to pass since they did not pass before.
Russian Speaking Network completed CRIME PREVENTION BEGINS AT HOME EDUCATIONAL AND CIVIC ENGAGEMENT PROGRAM on 4/14/2012. This 6 4-hour-workshop program was specifically designed for Russian-speaking population in East Portland. With each workshop we reached the following goals: (1) to raise the understanding, knowledge, and trust in the Russian-Speaking/Slavic community of local East Portland law enforcement and the American judicial system; (2) to train and motivate East Portland Russian-Speaking/Slavic community members to engage in crime prevention and law enforcement awareness activities in the East Portland neighborhoods where they live; (3) to expand the scope of involvement of the Russian-Speaking/Slavic community to prevent crime and improve livability in neighborhoods with a high concentration of our community; (4) and to prepare graduates for the next step of civic engagement and demonstrate the way of involvement in the East Portland Action Plan.
The Immigrant and Refugee Community Organization (IRCO) is working with community leaders/organizers from 6 language specific groups to provide support on civic engagement and advocacy activities for these communities who often have limited resources and have language and cultural barriers in engagement. Two workshops were conducted for the Somali community on housing rights and employment rights- topics identified by some community members as greatly affecting them. In February of 2011 the Central Alliance of Tenants spoke to a group of over 30 people about renters’ and property owners’ rights and responsibilities. In March, 2001 a local job coach spoke to the community on employment rights. Members of the Oromo speaking community also conducted two workshops, one on immigration rights and another on law enforcement rights and responsibilities. Members of the Tongan community have been involved in meeting with mayoral candidates for the upcoming election and meeting with city commissioners to discuss forming a community non-profit. The community also has identified immigration rights as a priority topic and a local immigration attorney came to speak to them about immigration specific issues. The Zomi-Burmese community is heavily involved in civic engagement, community building, and leadership activities, which the EPAP project is helping to support. The community attended a Tri Met budget forum and also went to Salem to advocate for the support of TANF in the legislature. The group also had a speaker from Japan discuss refugee rights in Japan with a discussion of the comparison to the refugee experience in the US. The community is currently working on organizing a Union of Burma all-ethnic conference and prioritizing educational issues. The Slavic community attended a TriMet budget forum meeting and a listening session for Slavic seniors hosted by Multnomah County Aging and Disability Services.
The following update is written in both English and Spanish. For English/Spanish translations or more information please contact Latino Network, Victor Salinas, victor@latnet.org, 503-283-6881. Description Latino Network facilitated a Summer Leadership Seminar on July 13th and 14th , 2012 to develop civic engagement and leadership capacity for Latino community members in East Portland. This two-day seminar focused on: • social justice • leadership development • civic engagement • community organizing • government structures The enthusiasm was awe-inspiring with 33 community members in attendance for the seminar. We facilitated the workshops Spanish to empower those who experience language barriers in access to resources to building capacity around community organizing and advocacy. Food and childcare were provided. The following is the agenda of the event followed by a narrative: Agenda Academia de Lideres Latinos Seminario de verano 2012 St. Peter Church-School House Portland 8623 SE Woodstock Blvd. Portland, OR 97266 Objectivos • Los participantes abran conocido la realidad de la comunidad latina en este país y la ciudad de Portland. • Los participantes entraran en confianza y se conocerán. • Los participantes abran entendido los conceptos básicos de Liderazgo. • Los participantes abran entendido las bases de la Organización Comunitaria • Los Participantes conocerán como esta compuesto el gobierno de E.U. Oregón Y Pórtland. Viernes, 13 de Julio 4:00 pm - 8:00 pm de la tarde 4:00 – 4:30 Bienvenida e introducción: EPAP, ONI y La Red Latina Comida y refrescos Revisar la agenda 4:30 – 5:00 Dinámica para conocernos. 5:00 – 6:00 Película: “Viva la Causa” 6:00 – 7:20 Reflexión sobre la película(trabajo en equipo). 7:20 – 7:35 Dinámica 7:35 – 7:40 Evaluación 7:40 – 7:50 Despedida Sabado, 14 de Julio 9:30 pm – 3:00 pm 9:30 -10:00 Desayuno 10:00 - 10:15 Bienvenida y introducción: EPAP, ONI, y Red Latina 10:15 - 10:30 Revisar la agenda 10:30 - 11:00 Taller 1: Tres Gotas de Agua 11:00 - 12:00 Taller 2: Nuestro Gobierno Regional 12:00 - 12:30 Lonche 1:00 - 2:00 Taller 3: Teresa Ríos Organización y Participación civic y el liderazgo de la comunidad 2:00 - 2:20 Compromisos y próximas actividades comunitarias (La telaraña). 2:20 - 2:40 Entrega de diplomas 2:40 – 2:50 Evaluación. 2:50 – 3:00 Agradecimientos, despedida y Avisos. Invitación al comité de Lideres DE LN. Para más información sobre la Red Latina y nuestros programas, llame at Jackeline a 503-283-6881 Ext. 117 o jackeline@latnet.org y Victor Salinas victor@latnet.org Ext. 114. El programa de Liderazgo y Enlace de la Red Latina es apoyado por medio de donaciones de City of Portland Office of Neighborhood Involvement y East Portland Action Plan. Narrative We began Friday evening with some teambuilding activities followed by dinner and a viewing of Teaching Tolerance: Viva la Causa; a film about the struggle of farm-workers in California, lead by Cesar Chavez and Dolores Huerta, for the human rights non-violent effort for justice in their working conditions which resulted in the first Farm-workers Union in the history of the United States. After the film we brokeout in small groups to identify ways in which communities and individuals can bring about justice in their communities. We invited each group to answer the following questions based on the film: 1.-¿Qué o quien te inspira para hacer cambios positivos en tu visa y en la vida de otros? 2.-¿Qué problemas o acontecimientos en tu comunidad te gustaría hacer cambios? 3.-¿Qué ejemplos actuales de Justicia Social harían Martín Luther King Jr., Mahatma Gandhi o Cesar Chávez como protesta? 4.-¿Qué quiere decir ser empoderado ? (en términos de la comunidad) 5.-¿Qué factores podrían motivarlo a luchar por una causa? Saturday morning we began with a continental breakfast and a session to increase awareness and understanding about LGBTQ rights, including Immigration, coming out issues, marriage equality, and suicide among LGBTQ youth, unconditional love and human rights. We began with a screening of Tres Gotas de Agua; a documentary about three Latina immigrant mothers talking about their children’s coming out processes, conveying powerful messages of unconditional love and acceptance of LGBTQ people as part of Latino families. We followed with a group discussion about social justice issues in the Latin@ LGBTQ community. This session was followed by another session that was facilitated by Cynthia Gomez to develop an understanding of federal, state, county and city government structures in order to build the communities knowledge on how these institutions work so that they can advocate for critic community and social changes. This was a highly interactive and informative discussion. Participants expressed an appreciation for this session because many expressed a lack of knowledge of resources in Spanish that provide information on this subject. After a healthy lunch, Teresa Rios a community partner, expert in popular education and community organizing, facilitated a session on community organizing, leadership and civic engagement. Teresa facilitated brainstorming activities to identify community needs stressing the importance on becoming engaged. In addition, developed capacity around how to organize our communities around a cause, and what civic engagement looks like. This session was designed to provide participants with the opportunity to gain and further develop their skills as community leaders. We closed with a powerful dinámica: La telaraña that exemplified the power the community has when we organize and work together. We followed up this activity with each participant sharing how they will use what gained in their communities and an awards ceremony. Latino Network is a 501c3 whose mission is to provide transformative opportunities, services, and advocacy for the education, leadership and civic education for our youth, families and communities. www.latnet.org https://www.facebook.com/pages/Latino-Network/162336889478
Nombre del Proyecto: Conexión Latina Nombre del Contacto del Proyecto: Claudia Carrillo Información del Contacto: clauca10315@yahoo.com.mx Agencia Patrocinadora: Hazelwood Neighborhood Association Action Plan por realizar: Realizar tres clases en Ventura Park Elementary School, con los temas: Consulado Mexicano, DHS y Violencia Domestica. Subsidio Total: $ 3,000.00 Después de hacer los contactos precisos en Ventura Park Elementary School, con el Director Jakob Curtis se procedió a invitar a las familias latinas en las conferencias de padres de familia los días 8 y 9 de Noviembre en la misma escuela. La invitación se abrió para las tres charlas antes mencionadas. En la primera charla titulada “El Consulado Mexicano” el día martes 29 de Noviembre de las 4:30 a 6:30 pm, asistieron 22 personas y con un servicio de cuidado de niños de 33. A las 3:00 pm en Ventura Park Elementary School, el grupo Conexión Latina, inició a preparar y organizar las instalaciones de la cafetería de la escuela, para recibir a los invitados de esta charla con un tema alusivo al pueblo mexicano con unos sombreros charros y dulces tradicionales. Se ofrecio comida y bebidas a los asistentes. A las 4:05 pm empezaron a llegar invitados y miembros del Consulado Mexicano entre ellos el Cónsul Lic. Jorge Torres y Lic. Gilberto Juárez. Exactamente a las 4:30 PM el Director de Ventura Park Elementary School, Sr. Jakob Curtis dio las gracias a los presentes en la charla y presento a Claudia Carrillo como Coordinadora de Conexión Latina y ella a la vez hizo mención de los orígenes del grupo , donde East Portland Action Plan es el responsable de nuestro trabajo en la comunidad, por el compromiso que estos tienen en el desarrollo integral de sus habitantes, antes de darle la palabra a los miembros del Consulado para que iniciaran su exposición; Claudia Carrillo presento los demás miembros de Conexión Latina, siendo estos María Luisa González, Norma Moreno, Rosa Hernández, Rosenda Gavin y Patricia Reyes. Inmediatamente El Lic. Jorge Torres inicio su exposición presentando a su grupo de colaboradores. Explicaron lo que es el Consulado Mexicano, sus funciones, servicios que ofrecen a la comunidad con los siguientes temas: doble nacionalidad, Visa tipo U y sus beneficios, Protección Civil, Revalidación del Bachillerato, Ventanilla de Salud, Matricula Consular, como obtener becas de estudio binacionales, la forma de obtener libros gratuitos para los niños y el sistema de educación abierta para adultos que se provee en diferentes plazas comunitarias en Portland como El Programa Hispano y Hacienda CDC, además hablaron del “Club del Gerundio” que contribuye con en el desarrollo de las comunidades en México. Para estimular la participación de los invitados Conexión Latina condujo una dinámica llamada “El Cartero”, en este juego algunos presentes hicieron preguntas relacionadas con los temas expuestos para los miembros del Consulado Mexicano. Lore Wintergreen nos visito y conoció al director de la Ventura Park Elementary School y comprobó el interés de los participantes en los temas ofrecidos por el Consulado Mexicano. Al finalizar la charla y para dar las gracias a los participantes se rifaron cinco canastas con artículos varios. En la segunda charla presentada el Jueves 8 de Diciembre, los miembros de Conexión Latina se presento a las 4:00 pm en Ventura Park Elementary School, para preparar el salón. Se ofrecio comida y bebidas a los asistentes. A las 4:15 pm, la Sra. María Prado expositora de DHS y los 23 participantes y 31 niños en cuidado infantil empezaron a llegar. La charla inicio como una conversación abierta con los temas relaciones al cuidado de niños y lo que el Departamento de Servicios Humanos del estado de Oregon, hace para garantizar la seguridad y bienestar de los menores de 18 años. La Sra. María Prado, también explico el procedimiento de abrir casos de denuncias de maltratos a menores y el proceso de remoción de estos niños de sus hogares. Se determinó lo que se considera abuso, maltrato y negligencia en los menores de edad y la responsabilidad de los padres en garantizar su seguridad. Al final de esta charla se rifaron 6 canastas con artículos varios. Para finalizar este proyecto, el día Martes 13 de Diciembre, dimos paso a la última charla titulada “Violencia Doméstica” conducida por UNICA con la Sra. Leticia Villegas. Se ofrecio comida y bebidas a los asistentes. A las 4:20 pm llegó la expositora Leticia Villegas y a la vez los 15 participantes y 31 niños de cuidado infantil. La charla se inicio con una lluvia de idea para conocer los tipos de abuso que la gente conocia y entre los que podemos mencionar: sexual, emocional, fisica, económica y verbal. Tambien explicó el perfil de un abusador y las etapas por las que el abuso va incrementando su severidad. Por otro lado, la mujer manifiesta culpabilidad y vergüenza al aceptar o tolerar el abuso. La Sra. Leticia Villegas, se enfocó mas en violencia domestica, debido que el grupo presente eran solo mujeres adultas. Al final entregó su tarjeta personal porque quedó comprometida en darle seguimiento a los casos que requirieran confidencialidad. Como siempre Conexión Latina rifó al finalizar la charla seis regalos con articulos especificos para la mujer y seis arreglos de mesas. Conexión Latina y sus miembros abrió las puertas en la comunidad de Hazelwood procurando integrar a los participantes a estas charlas proveyendo un ambiente cómodo, seguro y divertido a las familias que asistieron a las charlas, en busca de cambios que generen mejoras en la familias Latinas. Conexión Latina tenia como objetivo integrar a personas de diferentes areas de Hazelwood en las tres charlas, para lo cual habia hecho gestiones en Head Start – Hazelwood site; pero los padres de familia de Ventura Park Elementary School mostraron mucho interes en asistir a todas, argumentando que en este centro de estudio era la primera vez que habian recibido clases en su propio idioma y con temas de mucho interes para ellos. Por ejemplo, en la charla del Consulado Mexicano muchos mostraron intenciones en tomar clases para completar su titulo de GED y obtener mejores trabajos en el estado de Oregon, otros preguntaron en como se inicia el proceso legal para tramitar la Visa Tipo U de esta manera cambiar su estatus migratorio. Mientras que en la charla de DHS, los participantes mostraron interes en educarse como ciudadanos conociendo el sistema del Departamento de Servicios Humanos de Oregon, sus responsabilidades y derechos como padres de familia. En nuestra ultima charla de Violencia Domestica, las participantes mostraron mucho interes en como protegerse ellas mismas y en sus derechos. Porque la mujer es la unica que puede romper el silencio al abuso y maltrato. En todas las charlas hubo material escrito para llevar a casa para los que estuviesen interesados.
The Immigrant and Refugee Community Organization (IRCO) continued to work with community leaders/organizers from language specific groups in the second half of 2013 providing support for civic engagement and advocacy activities for these communities. A workshop was held for the Tongan community August 23rd at IRCO and was attended by 27 people, with guest speaker Fipe Havea from the Asian Pacific Islander Network of Oregon (APANO). Ms. Havea presented the Coalition of Communities of Color report on economic and education indicators specific to the Pacific Islander communities of Oregon. The community also discussed the importance of voter registration for the upcoming election and subsequently had the largest voter turnout from the Tongan community to date. The IRCO EPAP grant also supported a workshop among a parent group at Floyd Light Middle School in East County. On November 15th, 12 participants attended the workshop given in Spanish by the Immigrant Law group on the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals. These participants recorded sharing the information with 222 other community members reflecting the members increasing roles as community leaders and helping the broader community access information and resources.
The (VNCO) Vietnamese Community of Oregon worked together in partnership with (APANO) Asian Pacific American Network of Oregon to bring helpful workshops over a range of issues to the East Portland Vietnamese Community. The 2012 workshop series - The East Portland Vietnamese Leadership Network - was divided into one needs assessment workshop and four skill building workshops: Education, Public Safety, Civic Engagement, and Community Resources. The workshop series objective was Community Building 2.3. We were successful in bringing a wide range of participants and leaders from the East Portland Vietnamese community together to have meaningful, productive discussions, and planted the seed about the need for more younger leaders on behalf of the Vietnamese community and paved the way for future leadership development workshops that will build on the solid foundation from this workshop series. The East Portland Vietnamese Leadership Network workshop series strengthened existing ties between APANO and VNCO and its ability to support and cross promote events. It will also lead to a future training by APANO for VNCO's board and staff on how to more effectively engage their membership and how to be a stronger advocate and lobbying voice for the Vietnamese community.
Portland has the 9th largest urban Native community in the country. There are over 40,000 Native Americans in Multnomah County. Our population is young and growing, 61% under 35 years old. The Portland State University and Coalition of Communities of Color report, “The Native American Community in Multnomah County: An Unsettling Profile” details an array of disparities that exists for our community. For example, the average poverty rate is 34%, unemployment rate is 31%. Despite the challenges we face, our community is resilient and we have strong indigenous values and worldviews that contribute to the livability and uniqueness of Portland. During 2012 NAYA Family Center partnered with a variety of community leaders and organizations to bring six workshops focused on a variety of topics relevant to the East Portland Action Plan. Demographic information shows that there are increasing numbers of Native Americans living east of 82nd avenue. Workshops included: • Housing. Participants learned about Rental Assistance and other anti-poverty resources available through Community Alliance of Tenants, Siletz Tribal Office, as well as public housing and Sawash’s Kah San Cako Haws (East House), a project in NAYA’s housing portfolio. • Food Security and Economic Justice. Participants discussed the importance of Indigenous food systems and food justice as well as opportunities for micro enterprise. The community views community gardens as a source of accessing healthy foods as well as a place to organize and share information. The Native American Community Advisory Council formed in partnership with Portland Parks and Rec. to explore the development of Tribal Gathering areas in our park systems. • Education and Public Safety. Space was created to discuss rethinking and building upon current practices in our education systems. The group identified the importance of reclaiming Native American culture as a way to effectively reach our youth and create wellness among our families. Graduation rates are unacceptable; in Parkrose School District alone 85% of Native students did not graduate. Upcoming conversations will occur to learn in more detail the potential of creating a Native American Safety Patrol to address areas of concern community members, like the Elders, feel around safety issues. • Civic Engagement. The community participants identified that it is valuable to be prepared to talk about disparities that impact Native Americans, but equally important to highlight community strengths and solutions to addressing the disparities. East Portland will continue to see an increased presence and visibility of the Native American community and increase support for civic engagement and advocacy activities through housing development, economic enterprises, and culturally specific programming focused explicitly on East Portland residents who self-identify with the Native American community. Many of the workshop participants were community residents that were interested in learning more about the Native American community and the cultural aspects that are unique to Native American people. Creating space for cross-cultural sharing was a very valuable component of this series of engagements. We brought together a wide range of people to share information and discuss issues, identify common concerns and desires, and deliberate over planning priorities. The presenters that offered information at the workshops took away valuable insight about the history and traditions of Native people and fostered social ties that have and will continue to grow. In all, 38 differnt community members participated in the series of workshops. This is a testament to the success of the EPAP small grants opportunity and partnership with culturally specific organizations and groups serving the needs of our diverse community.
The charge of the East Portland Action Plan is to build community capacity to "provide leadership and guidance to public agencies and other entities on how to strategically address community-identified issues and allocate resources to improve livability in East Portland." To actualize this requires empowering and engagine East Portland residents and businesses in civic decision-making processes. EPAP is operationally concensus-based and this builds member capacity to engage in effective negotiation and decision-making. EPAP has general monthly meeting where coordination and consensus happens; monthly committee and subcommittee meetings that opporate as working groups; and Representatives that are issue-specific spokespeople for the EPAP. EPAP develops and actively advocates for an annual list of priorities related to the Action items; this advocacy builds the capacity of EPAP members to be empowered spokespeople and to negotiate in decision-making processes. The EPAP grants programs empower and engage East Portland residents and businesses in actively contributing to their community. Consensus development of grant criteria and review builds the capacity of EPAP members to understand and be involved in decision-making processes. The EPAP Project funding program builds the capacity of EPAP members to partner with and advise municipalities as they address Action items. EPAP Civic Engagement Grants and Neighborhood Small Grants have supported a number of leadership and advocacy trainings. EPNO, ONI, and other coalitions provide limited range of trainings, including neighborhood board orientation trainings. DCL program (see above) provides such leadership development for communities of color, immigrants and refugees.
The Vietnamese Community of Oregon (VNCO) implemented five workshops on health and community building for the Vietnamese community in East Portland. Participants discussed health disparity in the Vietnamese community and barriers to achieving good health. During the community building workshops, participants identified community strengths, weaknesses, needs, and priorities that will guide VNCO's future work.
Civic Engagement Community Building for Zomi. Project Contact Name: King Mang Zam with City Bible Church and ZOMI USA. Zomi Association of United States (ZAUS) received an EPAP grant of $7410. We are able to choose topics that Zomi community members will be more effective in civic engagement. We organize in small group and teach a series of one-two hour workshop that address the necessary need for members of the Zomi indigenous peoples of Burma. The workshops are; Rental and Home Ownership Rights and Responsibilities, Children and Families and The Law and Crime Prevention, Immigration and Citizenship, and Leadership Development or Leadership Placement. Rental and Home Ownership Rights and Responsibilities. Mung G Thang facilitator work with the support of Community Alliance of Tenants (CAT) and Center for Intercultural Organizing (CIO). 40 households took parts and 30 workshops were done in houses. Homes were visited so tenant could discuss the problems they have on hand. Total of $2890.00 was used for this workshop. Immigration and Citizenship. U.S. Citizenship 100 test questions and answers were translated in Zomi language by Dr. C. Thang Za Tuan and Yin Yin translated in Burmese. We appreciate that Multnomah county press printed the booklet for us. It is posted on ZAUS website (http://zomiusa.wordpress.com/translated-citizen-ship-test/). Burmese and Zomi throughout the United States have benefit from these translations. We have reports that 5 people have past their United States Citizenship test by studying this translated booklet. Many emails are received that express their gratefulness for this booklet. There were 10 citizenship workshops. Translated into Burmese and Zomi and web design cost $1400. Total of $2270, was used for this workshop. Leadership Development or Leadership Placement Opportunities. There were a series of two hour long (total of 5) leadership development workshop. This series of leadership development sessions taught us how to fully engage in the social, political and economic decisions that affect us. Part of the workshop included attending the APANO Statewide annual convention for Asian Pacific Islander communities in Oregon; on June 14-15, 2013 at Shalom Prayer Center Mount Angel. It was a powerful weekend of cultural sharing, inspiring ideas and excellent food and fellowship with API communities. We also took parts at World Refugees day on June 20, 2013 at IRCO. The total expense of this workshop was $680.
Russian Speaking Network completed its second program year in April of 2013. Crime Prevention Begins at Home (CPBH) program consisted of six crime-prevention related four-hour workshops. Main aims of the program was (1) to raise the understanding, knowledge, and trust in the Russian-Speaking/Slavic community of local East Portland law enforcement and the American judicial system; (2) to train and motivate East Portland Russian-Speaking/Slavic community members to engage in crime prevention and law enforcement awareness activities in the East Portland neighborhoods where they live; (3) to expand the scope of involvement of the Russian-Speaking/Slavic community to prevent crime and improve livability in neighborhoods with a high concentration of our community. We planned to enroll 20 participants to assure that 15 would graduate; however, all 20 participants met program graduation requirements and successfully completed the program. We got organized prior the project advertisement to create a plan that would assure smooth flow of the program. We recruited volunteers such as a Photographer, Interpreter, and Facilitator Helper for all six workshops. We created the agenda and schedule for each workshop according to which we invited speakers and assembled handouts in English and Russian. Usually we sticked to the same time patterns in our schedule to cover all topics within four hours. We started at 10 am with breakfast and ice breaker. At 12 pm we had 15-minute break. At 1:45 pm we usually started lunch. According to participants’ feedbacks and survey, we came to the conclusion that Crime Prevention Begins at Home program reached its goals and here are some exciting answers that we found in our bilingual, Russian-English, survey: to the question, ”Did you gain more trust for law enforcement entities?” a participant answered, “ Yes. My impression that Police discriminates Russian-speaking or any other communities dissolved”; to the question, “What training workshops did you find the most valuable for you and your family? And Why?” a participant answered, “Gang Involvement Prevention and Criminal Justice System, because I have many teenagers and it is crucial for me to know how to help my children to stay away from bad influence. We, immigrants, do not know laws due to many factors: language barrier and lack of information. Everything was important to learn! Thank you!; to the question, “Why did you decide to take Crime Prevention Begins at Home training?” a participant answered, “We all live in America with the limited knowledge of laws. My goal is to gain more knowledge and share with friends and relatives to prevent and avoid crime in my family”. All participants asked us to organize the same program again and have it on a regular basis. They want to see more Russian-speaking people take it.
Laotian Cultural Enhancement Workshop August 11, 2012 This workshop was designed to address the cultural enhancement for all Laotian Americans: Lao, Hmong, lu Mien, Tai-Dum, and Tai-Lu. This workshop included networking, information sharing, entertainment, food, and future planning to preserve our Lao culture. Under the leadership of Mr. Hongsa Chanthavong, the president of Lao American Foundation, I, Lou Sundara, was elected as the coordinator for this particular workshop. Our planning committee included the leaders of Lao American Foundation, members of Buddhathammaram Lao Temple, and respected elders. Object was to create a 6 hour day long workshop with a minimum attendance of 25 people representing all the different groups. With the $2,000 budget, we were able set up at Buddhathammaram Lao temple as the event space for workshop, provide lunch for our attendees, promotional materials/printings, office supplies, project materials, participant support, and administration. The following is our program for the day. 10AM: Opening Remarks by Mr. Hongsa Chanthavong, President of Lao American Foundation Lore Wintergreen, East Portland Neighborhood Office, to speak to the community about the services available from her office. Lou Sundara, Workshop Coordinator, open introduction of the workshop and the importance of all the leaders coming together to help network, preserve, and plan for the future of Lao culture in America as Lao Americans. 10:30AM: Introductions of all participants, Mr. Hongsa Chanthavong as the Lao American Foundation president; William Cha, the Hmong elder leader; Dianne Yongchu, Hmong leader; Kaochiem Chao, lu Mien leader; Chanson Sengsirivanh, Lao leader; Fou Choy Phan, lu Mien leader, Lo Van Than, Tai-Dum community leader. 11AM: Speakers Chansom Sengsirivanh, Lao community representative who is a legendary song writer over 55 years of experience. Mr. Kao Chiem Chao, Mien community representative William Cha, Hmong community representative Lo Van Than, Tai-dum community representative 11:30AM: What does your culture means to you? 12PM: Cultural Dance Performance 12:30PM: Lunch: Lao Culinary Experience 1:30PM: Lao Cultures in the News or lack thereof 2PM: Challenges? How do we make an imprint of ourselves? 2:30PM: Planning for the future, a Lao Cultural Center: Mr. Hongsa Chanthavong 3PM: Do you part! How do we apply ourselves to our Community, in our Neighborhood, with the East Portland Action Plan, and/or with the City of Portland 3:30PM: Open discussion Closing Remarks: Mr. Hongsa Chanthavong and Lou Sundara Workshop complete at 4pm We had 30 attendees participated in our event. This workshop created a summit for our leaders to come together with a purpose, one that made aware that we must focus on our identity living here in American as Lao Americans. All families have faced the transition process of raising a family in foreign land and acculturating to this new home. Through that process, some may have given up what it means being Lao. Young Lao Americans seldom speak their native tongue, write in their native language, cook their favorite Lao dish, understand or practice traditional ceremonies, and many more. The questions asked were: What does culture mean to you? What challenges are we face? How do we apply ourselves to our community to strengthen it, and how do we plan for the future to preserve our culture. The leaders and elders find this very first workshop very fitting and needed to address the issues. Although every family goes about teaching all that is Lao culture to their respective family and attend the usual Buddhist events at the Lao temple, but we need to make it a point to ensure that our children and generations understand and practice our traditions. With so many leaders and elders living here as the first generation Lao Americans, we must take this time to learn and take away from them as they are the real teachers today. If this doesn’t happen soon, the teachers will not be around to teach the new generations. We find that the idea of a Lao Culture Center would serve best as the cornerstone for our community. Although having a Lao temple is a big part of preserving our culture, it doesn’t serve all the Lao communities that do not participate in the Lao temple. The idea for this cultural center will be open to all Lao without reservation. As a workshop coordinator, I would like to personally thank all the sponsors: East Portland Action Plan, Office of Neighborhood Involvement, Wat Buddhathammaram Inc, and Lao American Foundation.
On June 27, 2013 Portland Youth and Elders Council and NAYA Family Center completed the last in a series of workshops designed for the community, by the community and focused on community youth ages 15-24. These workshops were funded by the EPAP Action Plan Civic Engagment small grants. This series of learning and action activities were called the 2013 Idle No More Youth Leadership Workshops. Community members and young Native professionals provided recommendations through a community participatory process to identify community priorities focused on youth issues. Through surveys and several outreach listening sessions, Youth told us that they did not want to just "sit around and talk about a bunch of boring stuff with a bunch of boring people", so we set out to bring information to the community in an exciting and meaningful manner. The outreach objectives for this project focused on: - Encourage participation from Native youth and their families living in East Portland - Ensure education and understanding - Build trust in civic engagment opportunities - Increase a sense of ownership - Instill community pride - Create a framework for momentum to continue into implementation The workshops brought in presenters on diversity in civic leadership, environmental justice, health and wellness, education advocacy, public safety, and mental health issues. There was plenty of food and cultural activity at each event. The participants were not only youth but included siblings, aunties, uncles, grandmas and grandpas, neighbors, and community allies. Once the youth got talking, it was clear that they do indeed care aobut our community and had distinct ideas and ways to get involved. At one of the workshops participants made t-shirts with the "Idle No More" insignia to wear at future organizing events and to show community pride. There are several priority issues that are an ongoing focus for the Native community living in the Portland Metropolatin area, these issues are also priorities identified in the EPAP Action Plan. Some of these similar priorities are seen in addressing housing that is affordable for all families; healthy connected neighborhoods with access to opportunity no matter where you live; refelction of our families in our public parks and natural areas and safe access to these public resources; we want to see our cultural/community values reflected in the public services that are available and we want equal access and equitable outcomes with reduction in the disparities that exist for our people; we want racial equity and accountability in policies that impact our well being; we want self-determination to be synonimous with public involvement; we believe our youth should be graduating at a rate that is comparable to white students; the list is long. We believe that when we can manifest these things for the Native community we can significantly improve things for the entire community. This series of workshops created a framework, encouraged and empowered more than 150 participants to continue advocacy efforts and create new opportunities to advance the priorities of the EPAP Action Plan and those of the community. The participants have been invited to continue participating as leaders with the organizations that contributed to the workshops which include NARA Wellness Center (122nd and Burnside), Siletz Portland Area Tribal Office (12790 SE Stark), City of Portland Office of Neighborhood Involvement, Portland Parks and Rec., Multnomah County Health Department, Portland State University, Portland Community College, Wisdom of the Elders, Native Wellness Institute, Grand Ronde Tribal representatives and many individual families and cultural leaders. The community has benefited greatly from this funding opportuntiy, we are stronger together, bridging generations and manifesting Change Agents! If you would like to connect with the work that Idle No More is involved with or any of the cultural events that occure in the Native community please contact Donita S. Fry, Portland Youth and Elders Council Organizer, NAYA Family Center, 503.288.8177, ext. 284 or email donitasf@nayapdx.org.
Nombre del contacto del proyecto:: Conexion latina III Nombre del contacto del : Claudia Carrillo Informacion del contacto : clauca10315@yahoo.com.mx. Agencia patrocinadora: East Portland Neighbors. Inc. Accion plan por realizar: Dos talleres en seis clases “La paternidad es un placer” y “ Liderazgo en mi comunidad” en la escuela primaria ventura park. Sudsidio total : $12,000.00 Se contacto a Jakob Curtis principal de la escuela para platicarle de nuestro proyecto y pedirle las instalaciones de la escuela para los talleres, invitamos a las familias hispanas que ya han asistido antes y a otras personas interesadas en nuestra clases los dia 28 nov,5 y 12 de dic, 16,23, y 30 de Enero. Para nuestras clases el grupo le LLC ( Conexión Latina ) siempre llego a las 4:30 para preparar y organizar las intalaciones, las clases se llevaron a cabo en la cafeteria y el cuidado de ninos en el gimnacio de la escuela, todas nuestras clases fueron de 5:00 pm a 8:00 pm. Alrededor de las 5:00 Claudia Carrillo coordinadora dio la bievenidaa los asistentes y presento a la facilitadora de nuestro taller “La paternidad es un placer “ Mayra Barrientos ella pertenece a la organización Northwest Family Services. En esta primer clase aprendimos como lograr tener relaciones saludables con la familia, explicamos el proposito de la paternidad el cual es proteger y educar a nuestros hijos para sobrevivir y prosperar en el tipo de sociedad en que vivimos. En la segunda clase de este taller se explico acerca de los diferentes tipos de comunicacion que podemos tener en la familia a base de cooperacion y responsabilidad ,valores y muchos temas mas que influyen en la paternidad. Se hicieron algunas dinamicas para reflexionar acerca de la responsabilidad de los padres. La tercera y ultima clase de” la paternidad es un placer”El dia 12 de dic. La facilitadora nos explico como crear una conexión con nuestros hijos,como podemos ser padres activos,nos explico acerca de las herramientas que podemos usar para poder tener diciplina eficaz con nuestros hijos y las opciones para lograr familias positivas. Al terminar el taller Mayra Barrientos,les obsequio un certificado por finalizar su taller. El dia 16 de Enero para nuestro segundo taller “Liderazgo en mi comunidad”nuevamente Claudia Carrillo presento a la facilitadora en esta ocacion Jackie Luna y agradecio a los asistentes, Nuestra facilitadora explico lo que es su organización Latino Network , cual es la funcion de la organización y como funciona esta. Mas tarde expuso la pelicula “del jardin “ en la cual refleja la lucha de los campesinos por unas tierras que ellos trabajaron y todo lo que ellos tuvieron que pasar para que sus peticiones fueran escuchadas al terminar la pelicula, se hizo una lluvia de ideas y se lograron algunas conclusiones, como plantear objetivos el trabajar y luchar por algo en comun, y que en equipo se trabaja mejor. La segunda clase del taller el 26 de Enero “Liderazgo en mi comunidad” aprendimos acerca de tipos de liderazgo que existen, hicimos algunos ejemplos en grupo para para representar diferentes tipos de liderazgo, analizamos que tipo de liderazgo queremos hacer . En la tercera clase de este taller que se llevo a cabo el dia 30 de Enero. Se aprendio acerca de los sistemas de gobierno y sus estructuras como podemos participar como lideres comunitarios y la importancia de ser activo en nuestro vecindario. Hicimos una dinamica en grupos y practicamos como se hacen las presentaciones ante la City Hall para comprender mejor como se toman las desiciones. Con esto dimos por terminado el taller, los asistentes recibieron un certificado de parte de la presentadora Jackie Luna por completar el taller . Celebramos la graduaccion de todos nuestros participantes por asistir a sus 6 clases, con un delicioso pastel para agradecerles su tiempo y participacion en los 2 Talleres. En todas nuestras clases se ofrecio comida, bebida,cuidado de ninos y los asistentes en las 6 clases recibieron un regalo por su asistencia, cabe aclarar que tuvimos una participacion muy positiva con 25 adultos y 40 ninos en promedio por cada clase. Anterior Siguiente
Russian Speaking Network held Civic Engagement workshop on the 5th of April, 2014. This session is one the most important ones; therefore, we invited many speakers to be able to convey our message more efficiently. There was Chad Stover, Project Manager at the City of Portland Mayor’s Office, David Chen, Portland Parks and Recreation, Terri Poppino, Crime Prevention Program Coordinator, Lore Wintergreen, East Portland Action Plan Advocate, and Arlene Kimura, Hazelnut Neighborhood Association Chair. In the beginning instead of our usual icebreaker, we gave surveys to participants to fill them out. Chad Stover talked about city bureaus and its structure and inspired participants to become community and civic life involved and burst into live discussion. All speakers spoke about Civic Engagement on different levels and in various areas to help participants understand that they can fight for the right to have what their community need and want to have. Participants got interested in doing volunteer activities in Portland Parks and Recreation and in attending East Portland Action Plan meetings and joining EPAP Subcommittees. Terri thoroughly described the neighborhood watch program and burglary/robbery prevention. Several participants got interested in organizing Neighborhood Watch in their neighborhoods and were surprised they can do that even if they live in apartments. Graduates got the list of copies of all speakers’ business cards. According to participants’ feedbacks and survey, we came to the conclusion that Crime Prevention Begins at Home program went with huge success and here are some testimonies that we found in surveys: to the question, “What training workshops did you find the most valuable for you and your family? And Why?” many participants answered, “Civic Engagement, Children and Families, Innocent Images, Measure 11, Identify a Crime.” To the question, “Why did you decide to take Crime Prevention Begins at Home training?” a participant answered, “I have lived in America for nine years and I am planning on applying for citizenship. I wanted to go through the training to get to know more about the laws to be a good citizen and be involved in city life.” All participants asked us to organize the same program again and have it on a regular basis. They want to have all Russian-speaking people take it.
The Urban League’s East Portland African American Civic Engagement Project was organized to address the needs of the African American community in East Portland who are experiencing the effects of displacement, isolation, the absence of traditional institutions and cohesive community. The Project aimed to help community-building through enhancing the skills, the organization and the engagement of specific groups of African Americans – students, parents, the faith-based communities, while taking the opportunity to establish visibility of the Urban League and to outreach to residents who were not organized or aware of our services and advocacy work. Our Action to be taken, included 9 workshops on Housing and Employment, Faith –Based and Civic Engagement, Schools and Parenting as Prevention Specialists, Black Student Union Leadership development and General Community Involvement and Leadership placement. Over-all, the Project was very successful, some elements of it more so than others. About 90% of the participants of the combined workshops were African American, and about 95% of them were from East Portland. The workshops in which we organized constituencies that were already organized, like the faith community, the BSUs and the parent groups worked extremely well. By providing skill-building workshops, we were able to help groups access their role in the east Portland community, develop collaborative relationships with others and to access how they can make a bigger impact in their institutions and in the community. For example, we brought together three church groups – Victory Outreach Church (16022 SE Stark Portland Oregon 97233), Emanuel Temple East – (14919 SE Stark Suite 111 PDX) and Consumed by the Harvest Church (17405 SE Glisan Portland Oregon 97233) who had not previously worked together in the area. The outcomes of the two workshops held are detailed below. About 25 participated across the two workshops and as a result several of the Pastors began to attend EPAP meetings. The Black Student Union workshops, helped Parkrose BSU to solidify its organization, as our project manager worked with them prior to the joint workshop with David Douglas BSU to come up with a mission statement, a survey and a plan for increasing their impact in their school. The collaboration with the better-organized David Douglas BSU was a learning and inspiration for the Parkrose students. We also did a leadership development workshop with David Douglas BSU which almost 40 students attended, focusing on communication skills and advocacy. The joint Parkrose/DDHS workshop had 16 from DDHS and 6 from Parkrose. The Schools and Parenting workshops were primarily skill-building and empowering parents to be more effective advocates in their schools. We did two in elementary school – Glenfair and Lynchwood; a presentation at Floyd Light middle school and are currently in the process of organizing with the David Douglas Sun School to hold a Black Parent workshop on Jan. 21st from 6-7:30pm at David Douglas High School. The theme or the context of the workshop will be to: Build parent advocacy skills and address and share with the David Douglas parents how to navigate the school system effectively.
LLC Latino Learning Community ayuda a estar al dia de los avances que se tienen para la comunidad hispana y en la ciudad de Portland, por medio de talleres y clases en las que participa la comunidad.
Introduction: With the Small Grant from the East Portland Action Plan (EPAP), Lao American Foundation and East Portland Neighborhood Office organized two large workshops and three planning committee workshops. One additional workshop was also organized as the First Lao Business Association Meeting and celebrated the success of this project. Outreach: Upon receiving the award from the City of Portland, outreach efforts had been taken place via E-Mails, letters and word-of-mouth to Lao business community, Lao community organizations, and mainstream agencies in East Portland. Workshops: The First Large Workshop was organized on June 28, 2014 and the Second Large Workshop was organized on October 11, 2014 both at the East Portland Community Center. Three planning committee workshops were organized at the East Portland Neighborhood Office and one additional workshop was also organized at East Portland NBH Office on November 20, 2014 . These workshops were conducted mainly in English since not all participants spoke fluent Lao. Accomplishments: Following are major accomplishments of this project: • Over 20 Lao business owners (Lao, Hmong, Mien) in East Portland and metro Portland who provide their goods and services in East Portland took out of their busy schedules attending the workshops on “How to Work with the East Portland Lao Business Community”. They discussed strengths and challenges, shared creative ways of partnering, and offered ways to cultivate the Lao business community as a whole. What they seek in the final product is to have the Lao Business community equipped with all the resources to complete their business community entity so that it can sustain itself in the future. • After several meetings over the summer of 2014, the Lao Business owners decided their first step was to form as a Lao Business Association that lays out the foundation for future work together. We have also amended the Narratives to reflect this update. They had worked out a mission statement, goals, and other details. The current mission of the newly established Lao Business Association is to enhance the Lao Business Community in the Portland/Vancouver area and to unite, promote, and educate their members to better serve the community while raising awareness of the Lao culture and customs. We also realized that although most of the Lao business owners and service providers that attended our last meetings were outside of the East Portland area, we did overall since the first workshop have attendance from business owners of East Portland. We also acknowledge these business owners/professionals serve the community in East Portland despite some of their office or location may have not been within East Portland but the community resides mainly in the territory. As a result, the business owners and professionals already cultivate, educate, and participate in the East Portland business community and planning on growing the community in East Portland. • What made these workshops culturally specific was the fact that it focused on Lao Business, targeted in East Portland. • As an outcome, the Lao Business Association will have a Monthly Meeting on 3rd Thursday of the month with a speaker of interest to increase membership and attendance and work on plan of action. Its First Meeting was on Thursday, November 20, 2014 at East Portland Neighborhood Office with 23 participants and the guest speaker from MESO.
From July 2013 to December 2014, the Community Alliance of Tenants (CAT) worked with tenant leaders of various communities, as community partners, to build up the voices for Tenant Power in East Portland. We held over 22 meetings, focus groups, "Hot Topic" presentations, advocacy opportunities, and Renters' Rights workshops, with over 200 participants and 6 partner organizations participating. The various tenant communities we worked with included: immigrants and refugees from Burma, Nepal, Thailand, and Bhutan (including Karen and Zomi communities); Spanish-speaking first- and second-generation immigrant tenants; and Somali immigrants. Topics of the training and presentations included: fair housing, how to keep your home healthy and safe, how to advocate, sharing our stories about our housing experiences, how to participate in civic opportunities. how to access housing resources, immigration and housing issues, how to write a letter to your landlord. Tenant leaders worked with CAT to identify policy campaigns that tenants wanted to advocate for. Tenant leaders chose to advocate for a number of programs in the city's 2014-15 budget including: more funding for rental -housing inspections; new letter-writing clinics to help tenants write letters to their landlords; evictions-court counselling for tenants with an evictions court date; and translations and interpretation services provided through the city and community-based organizations. Led a campaign that included; over 200 postcards, mostly signed by East Portland tenants, as well at written and oral testimony, presented at a budget hearing at David Douglass HS in the spring of 2014. The campaign was successful and everything that tenants asked for was funded! CAT also supports tenant participation in the EPAP Housing Subcommittee.
Man-Up and Chrysalis Ministries conducted two workshops, one for men and one for women on October 25, at the Rosewood Initiative in East Portland. The women’s workshop was fairly well attended by ten women, but the men’s workshop, conducted by Pastor Cliff Chappell, only had four in attendance in this first workshop. But because of the low numbers, we decided to not use that workshop as one of our requirements, but to have two additional workshops. Instead of having the next Man-Up workshops concurrently with the women's, we conducted them separately to give more privacy to the men. These two workshops were conducted on November 22, and December 6 and were very well attended with 15 on 11/22 and 14 on 12/06. One of the challenges that we discovered in hosting the workshops was that the men would come but because of the nature of the subject matter which was gang violence and domestic violence, they were very reluctant to give their contact information. In fact, some outright refused to give their information, but they did participate in the workshops. Their reluctance to provide their information only underscored the mis-trust in the community and the need to build healthy relationships, which we believe can lead to reduced violence. Some of the topics that we discussed in the men’s workshops included understanding soul trauma and how it can be identified in one's life, understanding the difference between abstract reality and present reality, and then how they could be identified, addressed and used in one’s life. In the second seminar we focused on understanding the true authentic self and defining our roles as men. To help us in understanding our roles as men, we viewed the video from the A Call To Men organization “Breaking Out Of The Man Box” and then had some very involved conversation around the Man-Box, what that looks like, how we have been socialized to be violent, and now that our awareness has been raised to recognize our violent tendencies, we can now use other means to express ourselves other than through violence and sexuality, and then hold other men accountable. What came out of the seminars was that several men have expressed an interest in becoming involved with the Man-Up Program and to be trained as quarterbacks, and to establish and lead their own huddles in other parts of the community. The women's workshops were entitled “It’s All About You: Self-Care Through Self-Discovery,” which offered African-American females an opportunity to recapture moments of their lives that were stolen from them as a result of their earlier childhood, adolescence and adult trauma. The self-care was designed to bring the participants into a place of self-discovery of how important they are to themselves and to others as nurturers and creators of the next generation. The workshops helped them to recognize and avoid trauma on all fronts and aspects of their lives, and offered them an opportunity to reflect on their past within a safe, confidential, and secure setting, and then they were empowered to revive, survive and thrive as overcomers of social ills such as domestic violence. The workshops were also designed to revitalize the consciousness of the participants, to glean knowledge on how to practice self-care through self-discovery of their own inner strength, as well as provide peer to peer support in overcoming those shared experiences. The feedback shared from the participants was 100% positive and full participation was witnessed in each of the workshops.
One Life Portland, LeFoster & Christopher Williams, have developed a program called Raising The Level for Black east Portland residents. We teach youth personal development, civic engagement, black culture, and entrepreneurship. During these classes we encourage youth to become civically active in their community.
SOAR, a program of Ecumenical Ministries of Oregon, is happy to report that thanks to EPAP, we were able to provide three bilingual Spanish-English Citizenship Class sessions in East Portland through our New Americans Initiative- East Portland program. We also decided to add a bonus class, at the suggestion of a volunteer, and offer it not only to Spanish speakers, but also to Russian speakers. With EPAP’s generous support during the 2014 Civic Engagement Grant program session, we provided 80 hours of instruction to more than 20 low income students. The Curriculum for our Citizenship Classes focused on an in-depth study of U.S. Civics and History with a strong civic engagement component, utilizing “Civics and Literacy (Citizenship: Passing the Test)” Third Edition. One class was offered at St. Matthew’s Episcopal Church located at 11229 NE Prescott St, Portland, OR 97220. Each individual is receiving a generous amount of practice and knowledge in preparation for a Naturalization Interview and U.S. History and Civics exam. Our second installment of the EPAP/SOAR Legal Bilingual Spanish-English Citizenship classes was held at Alice Ott Middle School at 12500 SE Ramona St. Portland, OR 97236. Our third class was held at Park Rose United Methodist Church located at 11111 NE Knott St. Portland, OR 97220. This was a small class, with three students, but the students were glad to have the help. One of our volunteers, who is also a recently naturalized U.S. Citizen, suggested that we offer our citizenship class not only with Spanish language interpretation, but also with Russian interpretation. She agreed to volunteer to teach the class with our Spanish speaking staff member. We advertised in both languages and ten students enrolled in the class. The class was held at Alice Ott Middle School at 12500 SE Ramona St. Portland, OR 97236. Student Story: On the first day of class, Rosa from El Salvador walked in and greeted Jaymee Martin, our Education Coordinator. Rosa expressed that she was grateful that SOAR was offering a citizenship class in Spanish, because she qualified for the “50/20 Language Exemption.” Because Rosa was over 50 years old and had been a legal permanent resident for over 20 years, she can take the Naturalization Test in her native language. Nonetheless, she’d printed off a Spanish-language list of the 100 Civics Questions she’d have to memorize and told Jaymee that she was overwhelmed by the thought of having to remember so much dense information at her age. “I’m so grateful to have someone to help me study,” she said. Every week Jaymee brought different lesson plans to break down the 100 Civics Questions into more accessible, student-friendly, and memorable learning modules. By the end of the classes, Jaymee noticed that Rosa remembered a great deal more than the first few classes when she relied heavily on her print-out list, and that her confidence had gone up drastically. Jaymee and Rosa also became close, high-fiving her successes and talking about the importance of citizenship with her naturalized husband who she often invited to join us in class. Last week we got the news that Rosa’s interview date is in mid-January. Rosa is so excited about the prospect of being able to vote in the upcoming 2016 Presidential Election, and to finally become a citizen of the country she knows as home.
The Community Alliance of Tenants, CAT, developed a new “Leadership Development” curriculum for emerging tenant leaders. Our first cohort, the LOVES, is a group of 8 Latino families - mostly mothers who speak little to no English. The 4-part series includes: Renters Rights, Fair Housing, Affordable Housing 101, Government 101, and How to Talk to Your Legislator and Advocate for Housing. A graduation and housing fair was held in June of 2015 at Rosewood Initiative, in celebration to support their efforts and education in developing their stories for effective grassroots lobbying efforts. The LOVES group has participated in a number of advocacy opportunities, and is helping to lead the Renter State of Emergency campaign in East Portland.
Crime Prevention Begins at Home (CPBH) program consisted of four crime-prevention related four -hour workshops. Main aims of the program was (1) to raise the understanding, knowledge, and trust in the Russian-Speaking/Slavic community of local East Portland law enforcement and the American judicial system; (2) to train and motivate East Portland Russian-Speaking/Slavic community members to engage in crime prevention and law enforcement awareness activities in the East Portland neighborhoods where they live; (3) to expand the scope of involvement of the Russian-Speaking/Slavic community to prevent crime and improve livability in neighborhoods with a high concentration of this community. We planned to enroll 25 participants to assure that 20 would graduate, and all 20 participants met program graduation requirements and successfully completed the program. We created the agenda and schedule for each workshop according to which we invited speakers and assembled handouts in English and Russian. The first workshop, Identify a Crime and Understanding Measure 11 and Communicating with Police, was held on October 6, 2015. The presenter, Chris Ramras, Multnomah County Senior Deputy District Attorney, talked about (1) types of crimes in Oregon, such as violations, misdemeanors, and felonies; (2) criminal justice system; (3) Measure 11. In surveys that we had our participants to fill out, all participants stated that they would share this info with others and that realizing consequences was eye opening and preventive for them. Many participants had no or very limited and false information about Measure 11 and types of crimes, which is worth to be aware of for parents with teenagers to prevent crime. The cheat sheet of Measure 11 Mandatory Minimum Sentencing was valuable tool that visibly demonstrated the way people get punishments. The second presenter was Irene Konev, Independent Police Review Community Outreach Coordinator. People were excited to get to know that there are ways to keep the Portland Police accountable. Irene started the presentation with the best tips on how to communicate with Police. There were many questions raised during Irene’s presentation, especially about when Police stops you on the street and how to ask Police for help on the street. Irene was very open, friendly, and knowledgeable. She explained the Police hierarchy structure, Police Process, and how to become a Police man/woman. Two participants filled out the form to say thank you for Officers who helped them. None of the participants knew about the Independent Police Review Division and what it does. They were also impressed by the fact that the Community Outreach Coordinator of this Division is bilingual in Russian and English. Presenters and participants appreciated the opportunity to communicate with each other openly and understand that calling the police is OK even in non-emergency cases. The second workshop, Domestic Violence, Child Abuse, was held on November 3, 2015. Presenter, Tatiana Bondarchuk, Lutheran Community Services NW, provided description of Domestic Violence and Child Abuse, American Family Law, and resources for domestic violence victims; shared videos and articles on about social media and its negative effect on lives of our youth. The presenter also did a separate presentation on: 1) how different our brains work and how it is related to children learning styles and parents-children relationships 2) how to build better/stronger and productive relationship with your children and teenagers. The third workshop, Gang Prevention, and Innocent Images, was held on December 1, 2015. Presenter, Tatiana Bondarchuk and Svetlana Ninuk, Lutheran Community Services NW, talked about signs of gang involvement in youth, human trafficking, prevention strategies for parents; shared videos and articles on social media, and its negative effect on lives of our youth. The fourth workshop, Civic Engagement and Graduation, was completed by the Project Coordinators. It was a conversation about how the Crime Prevention project was created and then funded by EPAP. Project Coordinators spoke about Civic Engagement on different levels and in various areas to help participants understand that they can fight for the right to have what their community need. Participants got interested in doing volunteer activities in Portland Parks and Recreation and in attending East Portland Action Plan meetings and joining EPAP Subcommittees. Participants’ church leaders called project coordinators and requested information of some presenters (Tatiana Bondarchuk and Chris Ramsan). Church leaders invited them to their churches directly. At our last workshop, we also shared information about what is legal and what’s not as to Recreational Marijuana, using http://whatslegaloregon.com. We clicked on each tab of this webpage and interpreted what it said. According to participants’ feedback and surveys, we came to the conclusion that Crime Prevention Begins at Home program is important for the community.
Ecumenical Ministries of Oregon's SOAR Immigration Legal Services Program surpassed our anticipated outcomes by hosting three Citizenship Class sessions for 2-hours in a ten week series for a total of 31 low-income immigrants! We hosted one Russian Citizenship Class and two Spanish Citizenship Classes. SOAR's bilingual and/or bicultural staff and volunteers taught each of the class series. The curriculum focused on an in depth study of U.S. Civics and History with a strong civic engagement component. The instructors utilized ‘Civics and Literacy (Citizenship: Passing the Test)’. At the New Citizen Celebration, several new Citizens spoke to the class about her experience with the interview. This was very inspirational for the students, and they were able to ask questions, and feel more comfortable with the process. Two of our volunteers are former students who became a U.S. Citizens. These volunteers helped teach the Russian citizenship class series. We have found that our naturalized citizens are really eager to encourage others to become US Citizens and become civically engaged. EPAP was acknowledged on all promotional and outreach materials for these classes. As previously mentioned, a total of 31 people attended the workshops. The first EPAP/SOAR Legal Bilingual Russian-English Citizenship class was held at the Midland Library. The second and third Bilingual Spanish-English class series were held at the East Portland Neighborhood Office. Each student received a generous amount of practice and knowledge in preparation for a Naturalization Interview and U.S. History and Civics exam. The classes were bilingually taught, and we spoke Spanish and/or Russian at the classes, as the classes were catered toward Spanish speaking or Russian speaking individuals. The practices making the classes culturally specific were the language spoken (Spanish or Russian), the translation of materials, and the bilingual instructors and assistants, Jaymee Martin, Angie Kelly (maiden name Guerro Leon), Svetlana Woitovsky, Anna Novikova, Susan Dussault, Aysmara Miller (maiden name Morales), and Anna Caesar. We are so grateful to have been able to offer these classes to Russian and Spanish speaking immigrants. We would like to thank EPAP for the generous funding, our wonderful and dedicated volunteers for the gift of their time, as well as the East Portland Neighborhood Office and the Multnomah County Midland Library for providing space and hosting our classes!
Started in 2014, APANO’s youth leadership council consists of Asian American and Pacific Islander middle school, high school, and college-aged youth in Portland. For the first action item, 50 East Portland Asian and Pacific Islander youth members will attend weekly meeting in East Portland to build leadership and East Portland student voice. The group has grown to a membership of over 200 students and a membership core of 50, and has also branched off to create a separate Pacific Islander youth group, and college youth group. The different communities represented in the group consist of Chinese, Vietnamese, Black, Khmer, Indian, Thai, Korean, Japanese, Marshallese, Hmong, Filipino, Samoan, Mexican, Tongan, Fijian, and Okinawan. When the group started, many of the students came from Franklin, David Douglas, and Madison High School, but this year, we have students also from Roosevelt, Benson, Wilson, Gresham, Clackamas, Mt. Scott, Helensview, Parkrose and more.
Actions to be Taken by Grantee Reporting  Community Alliance of Tenants engaged over 321 (221 specific to EPAP funding) East Portland tenants in civic engagement opportunities ranging from providing feedback on fair-housing related issues and their experiences of housing to the city, to engaging in intersectional housing discussions regarding transportation and housing concerns, to Anti-Displacement PDX’s community hearings and events, to engaging in a dynamic, intensive leadership development cohort strengthening their leadership around utilizing their experiences for storytelling purposes to engage in systemic change efforts. East Portland tenants also attended the #JustCauseBecause campaign kick-off and housing community hearing where tenants were able to share their experiences with legislative champions advocating for rent-stabilization and just-cause evictions protections. Participants were African-American, Native American, Spanish speaking, Somali, Russian, Burmese, Karen, Nepalese, Vietnamese, White, and others.  19 - 25 tenants engaged in 6 storytelling and leadership development trainings/sessions to develop their leadership and advocacy in skill-building opportunities at Earl Boyles Elementary School. Leveraged dollars were allocated to support East Portland tenants then engaging in CAT’s Tenant Leadership Council where tenants had a chance to use their developed storytelling and policy analysis skills. Tenants had a chance to weigh in on statewide policy development for the 2017 legislative session around Just Cause evictions and rent-stabilization, local efforts to enact Just Cause Protections in the City of Portland, and help launch a Community Based Participatory Research project designed to investigate and report the effects of evictions on most-impacted populations. Participants are from multiple communities including African American, Latinx, Vietnamese, White, Native American, and Russian.  3 tenants participated in the planning of a graduation and Housing Fair to celebrate the end of the storytelling, leadership development cohort, connect tenants to local housing stakeholders, and kick-off into engaging in other tenant advocacy opportunities.  6 tenants are participating in hosting a renter’s gathering in East Portland in January 2017 specifically to share their experiences of no-cause evictions and rent-increases. EPAP funding is not supporting this event.  Due to the size of EPAP’s award and a lack of leveraged resources awarded (an affordable housing initiative grant from a local foundation); EPAP dollars could not support a multi-day, multi-cultural Renter’s Assembly. The costs for multi-day translation services, transportation support, volunteer incentives, staff time and fringe benefits, operational costs to support the planning of this event are significantly higher than the award, and the execution of this event depended on these leveraged dollars that were not awarded to CAT.  Due to the denial of leveraged funding opportunities that we were vying for at the time we applied for this grant, EPAP Civic Engagement Grant was only able to pay for the storytelling/leadership development trainings before funds were spent in September. A replacement multi-day Renter’s Assembly will have to be scaled down to a one-day renter’s gathering set to be held in January of 2017 that EPAP funds will not support due to the end of the grant period and complete expenditure of funds.  4 media pieces (3 videos from East Portland leadership development produced, and 1 video surrounded around Just Cause Evictions which has been published on our website (www.oregoncat.org, www.stablehomesor.org, and our Facebook page) were produced to draw positive attention to East Portland and encourage local electeds to begin implementing Rent-Stabilization and Just Cause policies following the legislative session. This was successful in that the City of Portland has begun implementing Tenant Protections work in the Portland Housing Bureau including a substantial budget allocation in the 17-18 budgets for Tenant Protections measures (inspections mandates, landlord registration, just-cause eviction standards, rent-stabilization measures, and fair-housing concerns regarding screening). Mayor Wheeler has begun crafting Just Cause and Rent-Stabilization measures with a group of tenant leaders and advocates that will be accomplished within his first 100 days. It was also successful in helping to push the statewide legislative agenda for lifting the ban on rent-stabilization and implementing statewide just-cause protections. Evaluation Narrative This project was immensely successful in developing the storytelling leadership capacity of our project participants. Through an intensive storytelling workshop/leadership development cohort tenants learned the importance of telling their story in ways that affect systemic change. They then were coached and attended multiple events with us to tell their stories, ranging from media pieces, to rallies in Salem, to attending city hearings around Anti-Displacement, to video storytelling projects and beyond; utilizing their storytelling of displacement to help fuel the momentum seen behind efforts of addressing the housing crisis in East Portland and statewide. Tenants have also engaged in long-term opportunities to continue building their storytelling skills and leadership skills to address housing inequality and intersectional issues of transportation, economic development and more in East Portland. This promotes the health and well-being of tenants by developing their leadership in a capacity that encourages self-advocacy and further civic engagement in issues and decisions that affect their lives for generations to come, ultimately building collective power to help implement long-term systemic change.
The Iraqi Society of Oregon EPAP funded project succeeded in bringing women to public events, some of them for the first time to engage in such activities. This encouraged women to participate in other community activities specially in East Portland Action Plan meetings. The project action plan had three approaches combined in the process: first, adding new productive capacities in the community to establish new businesses, or expansion of existing ones; second, cultural orientation to help them restart their life in America and access the necessary resources for their resettlement; third, provide opportunities for the Iraqi women to engage in public activities and organizations to enhance the community organizing capacity of our organization and of other organizations in EP.
One Life Portland's Raising The Level program has held leadership and civic engagement classes in East Portland. Youth who attended our classes have been taught the value and importance of participating in their neighborhood/community. In our program, we have a section called Civic Engagement; we teach youth about local and national politics; particularly with a focus on the recent election of Portland’s Mayor and America’s President. During these sessions we promote EPAP and the East Portland Neighborhood office.
CB.2. 4 Develop an ongoing program to assess and improve East Portland's participation in City and County policy making and budget setting activities.
Add new update

Updates

In process of developing public participation framework for transit-dependent communities, primarily from East Portland, to influence TriMet policy decisions within their Transportation Improvement Plan
EPAP's Committees, Representatives (including several Budget Advisory Committees, the Planning & Sustainability Commission, boards, Citizen Working Groups,and Comprehensive Plan Policy Expert Groups), one-on-one advocacy with elected officials, and annual reports before Portland City Council and Multnomah County Commission improves East Portland's participation. Effectiveness will be assessed throught the EPAP Updates and the East Portland Action Plan audit. EPNO's neighborhood association chairpersons group, and ONI BAC are other opportunities for community input relevant to providing input to ways ONI can advocate for policy and budget change.
The Community Alliance of Tenants, CAT, mobilized and provided transportation and interpretation for the 2014-15 Community Needs Hearing in Gresham. This annual hearing is a joint effort between Portland, Gresham and Multnomah County. Most of the tenants we mobilized were from East Portland, and they shared their stories with staff from Portland Housing Bureau, Multnomah County, and Gresham, as each jurisdiction sets priorities for the next years’ CDBG funding from the federal government.
Actions to be Taken by Grantee Reporting  Community Alliance of Tenants engaged over 321 (221 specific to EPAP funding) East Portland tenants in civic engagement opportunities ranging from providing feedback on fair-housing related issues and their experiences of housing to the city, to engaging in intersectional housing discussions regarding transportation and housing concerns, to Anti-Displacement PDX’s community hearings and events, to engaging in a dynamic, intensive leadership development cohort strengthening their leadership around utilizing their experiences for storytelling purposes to engage in systemic change efforts. East Portland tenants also attended the #JustCauseBecause campaign kick-off and housing community hearing where tenants were able to share their experiences with legislative champions advocating for rent-stabilization and just-cause evictions protections. Participants were African-American, Native American, Spanish speaking, Somali, Russian, Burmese, Karen, Nepalese, Vietnamese, White, and others.  19 - 25 tenants engaged in 6 storytelling and leadership development trainings/sessions to develop their leadership and advocacy in skill-building opportunities at Earl Boyles Elementary School. Leveraged dollars were allocated to support East Portland tenants then engaging in CAT’s Tenant Leadership Council where tenants had a chance to use their developed storytelling and policy analysis skills. Tenants had a chance to weigh in on statewide policy development for the 2017 legislative session around Just Cause evictions and rent-stabilization, local efforts to enact Just Cause Protections in the City of Portland, and help launch a Community Based Participatory Research project designed to investigate and report the effects of evictions on most-impacted populations. Participants are from multiple communities including African American, Latinx, Vietnamese, White, Native American, and Russian.  3 tenants participated in the planning of a graduation and Housing Fair to celebrate the end of the storytelling, leadership development cohort, connect tenants to local housing stakeholders, and kick-off into engaging in other tenant advocacy opportunities.  6 tenants are participating in hosting a renter’s gathering in East Portland in January 2017 specifically to share their experiences of no-cause evictions and rent-increases. EPAP funding is not supporting this event.  Due to the size of EPAP’s award and a lack of leveraged resources awarded (an affordable housing initiative grant from a local foundation); EPAP dollars could not support a multi-day, multi-cultural Renter’s Assembly. The costs for multi-day translation services, transportation support, volunteer incentives, staff time and fringe benefits, operational costs to support the planning of this event are significantly higher than the award, and the execution of this event depended on these leveraged dollars that were not awarded to CAT.  Due to the denial of leveraged funding opportunities that we were vying for at the time we applied for this grant, EPAP Civic Engagement Grant was only able to pay for the storytelling/leadership development trainings before funds were spent in September. A replacement multi-day Renter’s Assembly will have to be scaled down to a one-day renter’s gathering set to be held in January of 2017 that EPAP funds will not support due to the end of the grant period and complete expenditure of funds.  4 media pieces (3 videos from East Portland leadership development produced, and 1 video surrounded around Just Cause Evictions which has been published on our website (www.oregoncat.org, www.stablehomesor.org, and our Facebook page) were produced to draw positive attention to East Portland and encourage local electeds to begin implementing Rent-Stabilization and Just Cause policies following the legislative session. This was successful in that the City of Portland has begun implementing Tenant Protections work in the Portland Housing Bureau including a substantial budget allocation in the 17-18 budgets for Tenant Protections measures (inspections mandates, landlord registration, just-cause eviction standards, rent-stabilization measures, and fair-housing concerns regarding screening). Mayor Wheeler has begun crafting Just Cause and Rent-Stabilization measures with a group of tenant leaders and advocates that will be accomplished within his first 100 days. It was also successful in helping to push the statewide legislative agenda for lifting the ban on rent-stabilization and implementing statewide just-cause protections. Evaluation Narrative This project was immensely successful in developing the storytelling leadership capacity of our project participants. Through an intensive storytelling workshop/leadership development cohort tenants learned the importance of telling their story in ways that affect systemic change. They then were coached and attended multiple events with us to tell their stories, ranging from media pieces, to rallies in Salem, to attending city hearings around Anti-Displacement, to video storytelling projects and beyond; utilizing their storytelling of displacement to help fuel the momentum seen behind efforts of addressing the housing crisis in East Portland and statewide. Tenants have also engaged in long-term opportunities to continue building their storytelling skills and leadership skills to address housing inequality and intersectional issues of transportation, economic development and more in East Portland. This promotes the health and well-being of tenants by developing their leadership in a capacity that encourages self-advocacy and further civic engagement in issues and decisions that affect their lives for generations to come, ultimately building collective power to help implement long-term systemic change.

CB.3 Involve East Portland residents in community projects and building community identity

CB.3. 1 Develop survey instruments and tools for community conversations.
Add new update

Updates

Developed and implemented bus rider survey to identify and prioritize transit concerns for East Portland bus riders.
Asian Pacific American Network of Oregon's (APANO)youth created a survey tool to ask other youth and adults in their communities about cultural identity and education.
Russian Speaking Network created survey for Crime Prevention Begins at Home (CPBH) project. This survey contains 10 questions.CPBH participants answered such questions as "Did you gain more trust for Law Enforcement entities." All participants answered YES. Some participants said that their false impression that Police discriminates Russian-speaking population dissolved. To the Question, “Why did you decide to take Crime Prevention Begins at Home training?” a participant answered, “We all live in America with the limited knowledge of laws. My goal is to gain more knowledge and share with friends and relatives to prevent and avoid crime in my family and to make my neighborhood a safe place to live.” to the question, “What training workshops did you find the most valuable for you and your family? And Why?” a participant answered, “Parenting and Connecting with Kids class was very important to hear for me, because if we have strong families--we will have strong country, that is why I hope to attend more of those classes and invite my friends.” This survey was available in two languages--English and Russian.
Supported survey and canvassing of the Glenfair neighborhood and a portion of the Centennial neighborhood through an AmeriCorps position and a neighborhood small grant. EPAP MAXaction, Youth, and Economic Development Subcommittees have used survey instruments and tools to facilitate community conversations.
The East Portland Neighborhood Office (EPNO) was the municipal project manager for the 2014 East Portland Communication Outreach EPAP Municipal Partnership Project, which EPAP allocated $27,409.08 on Dec 4th, 2013. A 20-page edition of the East Portland Neighborhood Association News (EPNAN) was sent out to all 57,899 East Portland households, as well as over 1,000 businesses, in the week of May 12th, 2014. This edition not only had articles about the "role of neighborhood associations and how to become involved", but also several about seeking transportation and parks input related to a survey insert, in four languages (English, Vietnamese, Russian, & Spanish.) Several articles thanked EPAP directly for funding this edition. There was also a full-color 16 inch by 20 inch map of East Portland in the center-fold. An accompanying 14-question postage-return paper survey insert was also sent out. It was in the same four languages, and was designed towards "community conversations" about transportation and parks issues. Over 1,200 have been received by EPNO so far, as well as over 300 online responses, for a 2.5% return rate. In creating the survey, the ad-hoc survey committee featured several active participants who do not normally meet in East Portland for such purposes, if at all, including from the Bicycle Transportation Alliance (BTA), OPAL Environmental Justice, the Portland Bureau of Transportation (PBOT), TriMet, Verde, the Northeast Coalition of Neighborhoods (NECN), Central Northeast Neighbors (CNN), Oregon Walks, Portland State University, along with representatives from the East Portland Neighborhood Office (EPNO), East Portland Neighbors (EPN), and the East Portland Action Plan (EPAP). The survey committee met four times, always at EPNO, for 2-hour meetings and also communicated via email. The committee put together 42 questions, which were reduced to 34 questions for the online survey and 14 questions for the paper survey. The paper survey, minus the postage-return, has also been manually administered in three CNN neighborhoods: Madison South, Sumner, and Cully.
Division Midway Alliance (DMA) developed a survey to determine how the community wanted to spend $50 on Capital Improvements along SE Division Street between 117th & 148th Avenues. At community events over the summer, 182 people responded to the survey. The Capital Improvement Committee is using these results to determine how best to spend those funds.
The project Portland Fruit Tree Project involved 890 persons in one capacity or another, of which 710 were east Portland residents. The project built a sense of community as individuals worked together, often across race and class lines, toward common goals, such as establishing the orchard or harvesting fruit. During these events we make time for relationship building exercises that foster greater connections among the participants. Also, many of the projects were organized in conjunction with non-profits that serve east Portland, strengthening our connections to each other, as well as providing a framework for them to better serve their constituents. Through these projects, community members got to know their neighborhoods better, understanding where fruit trees are located and how to take care of them. In doing so, they helped to build a more resilient community, which can access and take care of existing resources. Likewise, through the orchard construction process, participating residents were able to shape the nature of their community through making collaborative decisions about the orchard, as well as to gain a sense of empowerment over what happens in their neighborhood. The orchard creates a sense of place as well, where neighbors can feel a sense of pride.
CB.3. 2 Establish a "listening post" or information center at existing community-based events.
Add new update

Updates

Maxaction is working with Trimet to establish community bulletin borads at area max stations.
The East Portland Action Plan and EPNO have representation at many East Portland-based events throughout the year. At each event members ask for input, suggestions, and solicit involvement in organizing to address issues in East Portland.
The Association of Slavic Immigrants US 2015 "Slavic Culture Festival": The festival helps to identify new young leaders and provides them with an opportunity to try their hands in doing new things and strengthen their friendships. The festival also demonstrates interest on the part of the city administration as well as the potential the city, including East Portland, has for growth and development of its inhabitants. The steering committee has already started receiving new ideas for 2016 festival from the Russian speaking community. Many organizations who had information tables, took advantage by asking for input from the large numbers of people attending the festival.
CB.3. 3 Initiate "community conversations" at community forums and with existing groups to lay the foundation for community identity.
Add new update

Updates

Convene monthly Bus Riders Unite! general membership meeting for residents of East Portland to discuss transit-related concerns and develop solutions
We addressed goal CB.3 by the very nature of our "Subotnik" event – a collaborative, community project requiring the participation of East Portland residents living at Springwater Commons. The event provided a forum for multicultural interaction and ongoing discussion. The event was represented by a diverse group of families hailing from many nations, including Iraq, Honduras, Russia, Ukraine, Romania, and other countries. Families representing many cultural and ethnic backgrounds came together and collaboratively rebuilt, restored and revitalized their community.
For the Building Cultural Bridges project, two community brainstorming sessions happened in East Portland. One involved over 20 members aged 5-75, and the other happened amongst students in the Bhutanese student club about their experience coming to school in America. Together, members of the Bhutanese community discussed common experiences of coming to America, life in the camps, and the realities of transition. After this, the team of students at David Douglas and two representatives from the community meeting (a boy and a girl) were chosen to learn video skills. They then conducted inter-generational dialogue with their elders at two different community testimonial sessions, where over 40 community members turned out for a day of taped discussion. By having the film be screened and talked about in public with the community on December 17, we also built points of discussion amongst the community members with the final product as the beginning point.
Russian Speaking Network held "community conversations" to identify common community needs and issues. Russian-speaking (people from Moldova, Ukraine, Russia, Belorussia, Georgia, Armenia,etc) people stated that they would love to see MEASURE 11 AND TYPES OF CRIMES as a mandatory class in Middle/High School, so that their kids would know the clear difference between Bad and Good.
A 2012 EPAP grant supported a staff position to carry out the work of The Rosewood Initiative. During the grant period, 4 community meetings were held in Rosewood to connect neighbors and partners and build community identity and pride. Through these meetings as well as Board meetings, we are working to open a community space for Rosewood to base our community development work. We also held a 4 part "Rosewood Revitalization" series and a holiday party attended by more than 200 people to continue our efforts in building community identity. During the holiday party, neighbors were asked to participate in conversations and activities about the community and what they would like to do to build a safer, healthier and more prosperous neighborhood. This feedback is used to drive the work of The Rosewood Initiative with all of our partners.
The East Portland Action Plan monthly general meeting serves as a forum for community conversation and decision-making. The EPAP Subcommittees function as groups that lay foundation for East Portland community identity. Supported organizing efforts through an AmeriCorps position working in the Rosewood area (Portland/Gresham border at Burnside). Supported a drop-in place for the local community members to gather for safe/positive interaction, and a monthly meeting of community members and agency staff to talk about issues and activities in the area. The Rosewood Initiative has now been established as a non-profit and continues to receive EPAP grant support.
The Lent Elementary Native Habitat Project has brought together a number of stakeholders and partners centered around the Lent Garden and Outdoor Education Space (GOES). Partner groups and stakeholders include: the Lent Garden Committee, the Lent PTA, Growing Gardens, Portland Public Schools, Ecology in Classrooms & Outdoors, Oregon Tradeswomen, and Ecotone Environmental. The GOES is a community resource for neighbors, students, and families of students. The site has been, and will continue to be, the location of several community workdays and garden celebration events.
Division Midway Alliance for Community Improvement participated in 6 community events during the summer of 2014 to engage the community about its activities and mission. DMA was able to engage 182 people to participate in its survey and four community members decided to join DMA's team by becoming involved with a committee.
One Life Portland's Raising The Level program has held leadership and civic engagement classes in East Portland. During the section titled, "Talk Black To Me", we initiated community conversations in regards to Black East Portland residents. A lot of our conversations were with students at David Douglas High School. Talk Black To Me is a discussion/lecture about Black culture, history, and unity.
Portland Fruit Tree Project worked with 18 East-Portland serving organizations including Friends of Zenger Farm, Gilbert Heights Elementary SUN School, Lents Farmers Market, Sunday Parkways, Parkrose High SUN School (and their student service club), David Douglas High School, Parkrose Farmers Market, The Rosewood Initiative (East Portland Job and Resource Fair), and The Portland Kitchen.
Portland Fruit Tree Project worked with Parkrose SUN and David Douglas SUN schools during resource fairs and community events in 2014 to engage more East Portland residents in our programming and build community identity. We look forward to further developing these relationships and new relationships with East Portland SUN schools to become a greater part of the SUN school community.
Wat Buddhatham-Aram used East Portland Action Plan Civic Engagement grant funds to fund a series of community conversations: At the First Workshop on August 9: participants discussed the origin and the development of Lao language including different ethnic groups from Laos and also discussed the background and the development of Laotian cultures. Few participants came to the Second Workshop on September 6 and we decided to discussed more on the important roles of Lao language and Laotian cultures on the third workshop and provide additional discussion at our meeting on November 2, 2014. At the Third Workshop, participants focused the important roles of Lao language and Laotian cultures and identified ways and developed a plan for future action. • Two documents: Lao Language and Cultures of Laos in a brief in Lao with a summary translation in English have been distributed for participants and others.
Division Midway Alliance (DMA) Pilot Art on the Box Mural Project youth artists worked in collaboration with Morpheus Youth Project and the Regional Arts & Culture Council to capture the community's flavor and identity in the mural.
Free Arts NW in partnership with Powellhurst-Gilbert Neighborhood Association held 3 community focus groups to gain input about East Portlaners' opinions about their community and what they value. The opinions expressed at these gatherings informed youth artists in creating mural designs for public art projects.
Parkrose Heights Association of Neighbors' Hazelwood Hydropark Kiosk project held multiple events at the hydropark to engage the community in the immediate area to come and participate in planning for future improvements to the park.
One Life Portland's Raising The Level program has held leadership and civic engagement classes in East Portland. During the section titled, Culture and History, we initiated community conversation in regards to Black East Portland residents. A lot of our conversations were with students at David Douglas High School. Talk Culture and History is a discussion/lecture about Black culture, history, and unity. Once the community has their consciousness raised they will continue to have these conversations which will eventually lead to action.

CB.4 Create community gathering places in East Portland to increase community identity and pride

CB.4. 1 Develop areas that are a source of community pride and identity: foster an 'eastside downtown' and community gathering areas and/or farmers markets.
Add new update

Updates

The garden has been around for three years and each of those years we have had a Harvest Festival to celebrate what has been grown in the garden and the celebration of community (meaning the people) who have worked together to keep the garden looking so good. A number of people who live the neighborhood walk by and comment: "The neighborhood looks better with the garden here and I enjoy watching it grow" "You have done a great job with the garden" "I'm glad your are helping the people of David's Harp learn to grow organic food" "This garden is beautiful and they are doing a great job keeping it growing
The Rosewood Initiative completed a community mural in August of 2012 at SE 162nd Ave and Stark. The mural serves as a visual sign of hope and change in the community, to those that live in Rosewood and those that pass through. We partnered with local artist Antwoine Thomas, mural artist Addie Boswell, Regional Arts and Culture Council, and East Portland Neighborhood Office, as well as hundreds of neighbors to complete the mural. The community has an incredible amount of ownership and pride in this mural and it has truly transformed a crime-ridden intersection.
Northwest Housing Alternatives has the Springwater Commons Learning Garden up and running and is engaging parents and youth of all ages. Residents have mentioned that the garden is great source of pride, particularly to the children, who work hard to care for the daily needs of the garden. They have also enjoyed the rewards; strawberries, radishes, lettuce and tomatoes.
Portland Fruit Tree Project partnered with Parkrose Community United Church of Christ and East Portland community members to begin planning East Portland’s first community orchard on public land. We had a soft ground-breaking in June 2015, open to East Portland neighbors and the public. This was the beginning of a huge ongoing community effort, which will be underway for years to come.
With the Small Grant from the East Portland Action Plan Civic Engagement Grant and through the partnership with different organizations, Wat Buddhathammaram and Lao American Foundation presented Lao Traditional Dance Practices and 3 Lao Language and Cultural Workshops from August to November 2014 at Wat Buddhathammaram.
The Outgrowing Hunger Neighborhoods Community Garden at 835 SE 162nd Ave has become an identifiable source of community pride for both the participants and neighbors of the garden. With the support of a 2014 EPAP general grant we continued to increase the use, improve the infrastructure, and build the sense of community. The garden area now has 2 outdoor kitchens, 3 picnic tables, and a permanent waterproof tent and sun shade feature which provides a wonderful sense of place.
Portland Fruit Tree Project established a new community orchard at Parkrose United Church of Christ at 125th and Halsey. Seventy six volunteers helped build it (60% of whom were from east Portland). Numerous local businesses and groups contributed to the event. The design of the orchard was informed by community opinion.
Youth from Morpheus Youth Project Hip Hop program performed at two East Portland locations, providing cultural arts enrichment to the community through music and dance. The first performance was in the way of a dance competition held at the IRCO center on 103rd and Glisan (courtesy of EPNO grant via MYP). Six students competed in the 3v3 dance competition that was part of the New Birth Anniversary Free Community Jam on June 18, 2016. The other event was via a partnership with Rosewood Initiative to host the first Friday Night Jam on June 24, 2016. Two youth performed songs and five youth performed a breakdance showcase.
The Malden Court Community Orchard, located at 7677 SE 87th Avenue, is a project of Green Lents (in partnership with the City of Portland and many other organizations). Transforming the site from an illegal dumping ground, which attracted criminal and nuisance behaviors, into a beautiful space with public and environmental benefits, has brought neighbors together. The Orchard has been attracting residents to enjoy nature, to labor side by side at public work parties, and to share in the harvest of organically grown food. Immediate neighbors testify that the development of the Orchard has reduced crime and improved the livability of their street. People walking and bicycling past on the Springwater Trail have stopped to enjoy the new open air gazebo and to learn about the project. Everyone who has participated in the creation of the Orchard is justifiably proud of our collective accomplishment, which was heartily celebrated at the Grand Opening on September 17, 2016.
The artists who created the Division Midway Alliance (DMAP mural for the Art on the Box project have expressed a sense of pride and community ownership by participating in this project. One artist who works with an East Portland artists' guild has expressed a desire to work with more area artists to create more murals. Community members have expressed a sense of pride and joy at seeing themselves reflected in the panels and are often seen taking the time to view the mural from all sides.
CB.4. 2 Identify target areas for holding community organizing activities such as commercial nodes or neighborhoods focal points such as schools, parks or community centers.
Add new update

Updates

In the early building of the community garden we had a youth group from Idaho come and help build some of our raised beds as a community service project. We added three raised beds this year and the last one to go in was worked on by our joined youth groups from Parkrose United Methodist and Parkrose Community United Church of Christ. These youth worked together in the garden and produced a number of tomatoes plants from their raised bed and made a number of canned items.
Russian Speaking Network identified Russian-speaking community gathering centers such as local community churches and apartment complexes. These are places where we mostly found people to recruit for the Crime Prevention workshops, as well as organized classes, such as ESL, Parks and Recs announcements. We also distributed valuable resources at these places.
The Eastminster and Parkrose UCC congregations have been devoted to making their large property at NE 125th and Halsey into a hub for community organizing. The two initiatives which have facilitated this most are hosting a homeless shelter and creating the community garden. Grow Portland partnered with the congregations and took the lead on developing the garden including raising over $40,000 for its construction. Grow Portland hosted two volunteer work days that brought over twenty gardeners together. Gardeners provided 2,500 pound of food local charities including Snowcap. The garden is a source of pride and interest for garden participants and those who utilize Parkrose UCC for social or religious services.
The Rosewood Initiative organizes community activities at and around the area of SE 162nd Ave and Stark. The commercial center at this intersection struggles to be the safe and vibrant place the community needs it to be. We have identified this as the focal point for The Rosewood Initiative's community organizing and development activities.
Focal areas for organizing identified on a project by project basis. EPAP actively worked with the Portland Development Commission to establish four Neighborhood Prosperity Initiative areas in East Portland. These areas are to suppliment the Gateway and Lents commercial nodes as main street areas. EPAP member were also influencial in developing the Outer Powell Blvd. Conceptual Design Plan that establishes improvement to Powell Blvd in alignment with main street infrastructure development. EPAP has created an East Portland facilities list that is frequently requested and utilized city-wide. EPAP is working with the Gateway Education/Economic Development Center to position Gateway as a true Regional Center as it is stipualted to be in the METRO 2040 Plan.
Parkrose Heights Association of Neighbors Hazelwood Hydropark Kiosk project has created a community gathering space for those people living and working between Glisan and Halsey. This kiosk is meant to not only serve this area but to create a bridge to the nearby Halsey area which is being upgraded and improved.
CB.4. 3 Develop gateway plans for key entries into East Portland.
Add new update

Updates

CB.4. 4 Support East Portland as the location for a citywide Multicultural Center.
Add new update

Updates

Community visioning sessions in East Portland were conducted for the Building Cultural Bridges project. One East Portland based community wide meeting happened to develop ideas for the film, and another full day of testimonials and interviews that included over 40 members of the Bhutanese community aged 5-75 were conducted. B Media Collective met with members of David Douglas High school's Bhutanese student group over the course of 5 months to do skill-based teach ins, and film sections of the film. Members of the youth video team attended the community civics class at the East Portland Community Center to invite their elders to participate in the project, and document their graduation ceremony. All together a rich series of community meetings happened in East Portland over the course of this project.
ONI already funds IRCO (Immigrant Refugee Community Organization) for civic engagement efforts. IRCO has several community centers including their primary complex on Glisan and 103rd. ONI also funds Center for Intercultural Organizing which has been a strong advocate for a multicultural center. East Portland Action Plan is currently working with their Civic Engagement Subcommittee members and language and culturally-specific grant awardees to advocate with the Mayor's Office East Portland Arts Collective to pursue developing partnerships for the utilization of the former Marshall High School as a short-term temporary Multicultural Center. EPAP's work with the Gateway Education/Economic Development Center includes developing a partnership with METRO to establish a Multiculutral Center in the Gateway Transit Center area.
To build Lao community support for an East Portland Multicultural Center, Wat Buddhatham-Aram used funding from an East Portland Action Plan Civic Engagement grant to develop a Plan of Action that was approved on November 2, 2014 for future implementation with three recommendations: Continue preserving, promoting and enhancing Lao Language and cultures, continue preserving and developing Lao traditions by having elders and parents as a role model, and New Year Celebration: Lao New Year, Hmong New Year, Mien New Year-Support each other/Work together.
Это 6-й славянский фестиваль в городе Портланде и он же 2-й по - счету на территории Lents park, address is SE 92/Holgate. Этот Славянский фестиваль как и первый Славянский фестиваль в Lents парке проходил при большой помощи EPAP. 26 июля 2014 г. в парк на славянский фестиваль пришло более 5500.00 человек. Целый день 41 вендор предлагал гостям парка услуги на любой вкус; 5 food court’s кормили людей самой разнообразной пищей. 2 организации были приглашены на фестиваль впервые и у нас возникла хорошая дружба с этими компаниями, они получили приглашение и на следующий год. Во время подготовки к фестивалю много людей хотело участвовать и участвовало! в заседаниях оргкомитета фестиваля. 12 футбольных команд оспаривали первенство , кто лучше? Сильнее? ( В прошлом году это было 4 команды.. растем!) 25 волейбольных команд также боролись за денежный приз. ( в прошлом году это было 23 команды). Появились люди, которые и в будущем будут участвовать в работе по подготовке и проведению фестиваля 2015. Они вошли в оргкомитет фестиваля. Музыкальная группа , выросшая из музыкантов города Портланда…Ах какой была игра ..! играла эта группа на бис – полностью оплатила аппаратуру для музыкантов всего фестиваля на целый день. Это было гениально! Сильная и стильная группа г-на Рудницкого.! Association of Slavic Immigrants Oregon held the 6th Slavic Festival in Portland and it's the 2nd one in succession in Lents Park at SE 92 Holgate with the assistance of East Portland Action Plan (EPAP). More than 5,500 people came to the park to participate in the Slavic Festival. All day 41 vendors offered to the park guests services suited for every taste; 5 food courts provided most diverse food for people. Two organizations were invited to participate in the festival for the first time, and we established a good friendship with these companies, they also received an invitation to participate in the festival next year. Children and adolescents prepared a special program for the festival performances based on the historical realities of the state. There was a special playground for young children set up there. During the preparation for the festival, many people wanted to participate and participated! in the meetings of the organizing committee of the festival. Twelve soccer teams competed. Who is better? Who is stronger? (Last year there were 4 teams at the festival, we're growing!) Twenty five volleyball teams also competed for a money prize (last year there were 23 teams at the festival). There were people who in the future will be involved in the preparation and conducting the festival in 2015. They joined the festival steering committee. The music group that grew out of the musicians of the city of Portland. Oh, what a great performance it was! It was encore - it fully paid for the equipment used by musicians at the festival for the whole day. It was brilliant! Strong and stylish group of Mr. Rudnickiy! Festival ended unusually and grandly: a huge screen appeared from out of the ground and when it got dark, they started showing a beautiful movie in Russian. The movie was nominated for "Oscar", the name of the movie - "WHITE TIGER", Mosfilm studio, director - Karen Shakhnazarov. According to the estimates about a thousand guests stayed to watch the movie after the concert.

CB.5 Foster and market East Portland's positive attributes

CB.5. 1 Promote positive media stories for East Portland.
Add new update

Updates

A story about NW Garden Academy has been published and advertising purchased in the Mid County Memo. This is a local newspaper that reaches thousands of households in the local community. In addition, gardening sessions and workshops have been listed on the iFarm link of "Friends of Family Farmers" and the Oregonian event pages. The Academy has been presented to Argay and Parkrose Neighborhood Associations as well as the Midway and Parkrose Business Associations. Finally, signage and an information box has been erected at the garden site on NE Shave St and NE 122nd Ave and Parkrose Community Foundation had an information booth set up at the Parkrose Farmers Market distributing brochures for four weekends.
The Building Cultural Bridges Project as a whole is worthy of press, considering the deep youth-elder mentorship component, and the popular education models that were experimented with and developed in the project. See the Oregon Live coverage at: http://blog.oregonlive.com/my-portland/2011/12/documentary_film_coming_to_ame.html
Direct link: http://eastpdxnews.com/general-news-features/parkrose-heights-gardeners-celebrate-harvest-of-crops-and-growth-of-community/
Maxaction has help 5 cleanups along the Max Blue line during 2011. Three of these evets have been covered by local media as positive neighborhood events.
The Rosewood Initiative has been featured in the Oregonian and 3 times in the Gresham Outlook. East PDX news has printed 2 stories about activities at Rosewood. Our mural at SE 162nd Ave and Stark is featured on the Regional Arts and Culture Council website. Venture Magazine from Mount Hood Community College printed a feature story about Rosewood. Our work has also been in The Skanner News.
Positive stories and activities are promoted through the East Portland Neighborhood Association News, a quarterly newsletter that is mailed to 7000 East Portland addresses. East Portland Action Plan submits positive media stories to every issure of the East Portland News and coordinates representatives to speak with media on a regular basis. East Portland Action Plan developed a brochure with a front page that states: "Pride in East Portland A Great Place to Live and Grow". EPAP funded an East Portland Economic Development Assessment that they made sure acknowledged East Portland attributes. The EPAP website focuses on East Portland attributes, including updates to the Action Plan. One of 5 priority strategies for the EPAP Economic Development Subcommittee is "Market East Portland as a Place to do Business".
Morpheus Youth Project was featured on KBOO Community Radio's Prison Pipeline program (KBOO 90.7 FM) on January 18, 2016 and on Portland Radio Project's "Raising the Bars" Radio on March 10, 2016. On both programs MYP promoted our East Portland Hip Hop program. http://kboo.fm/media/44024-morpheus-youth-project and http://prp.fm/show/raisingthebars/
Portland Fruit Tree Project conducted 10 community harvest events in east Portland. Roughly 64% of the participants in these harvest self-identified as low-income. We worked with JOIN, Parkrose Sun School, Portland Kitchen and other partners to recruit attendees. Three of these harvesting events were considered “group harvests,” meaning that they were not open to the public but just to those individuals associated with an organization. These groups were Parkrose SUN School and Portland Kitchen. We harvested 1534 pounds of fruit from 12 sites during these events. An estimated 298 households received fruit picked through PFTP’s events. We registered additional trees in east Portland, bringing our total up to 399 trees, and increase of 19%. We had contemplated a 10% increase. We organized two east Portland tree scouting days, at which only 20 persons attended, half of the expected number. Only three of these 20 were from east Portland, due in part to a staffing interruption, as our Community Involvement Coordinator left. We organized four tree care workshops in east Portland, training 54 total participants, surpassing our objective of 30 persons. We held two food preservation workshops with Portland Kitchen’s high school clients, meeting our goal.
The Malden Court Community Orchard, a project of Green Lents, has generated many positive news stories about Lents neighborhood. Here is a list with links to the articles and photos. Public Engagement process: The Oregonian and City of Portland http://www.portlandoregon.gov/bps/article/507700 http://blog.oregonlive.com/higher-education/2014/12/psu_students_clear_the_way_for.html#incart_related_stories Goat stories: Oregon Live, DEQ, Portland Tribune and KPTV http://www.oregon.gov/deq/Pages/Features/communityorchard.aspx http://portlandtribune.com/sl/255023-125243-it-takes-a-village-and-some-goats- http://www.oregonlive.com/portland/index.ssf/2015/03/goats_clear_the_way_for_commun.html http://www.kptv.com/story/28581062/state-brings-in-goats-to-clear-area-for-community-garden General Coverage: Portland Tribune http://portlandtribune.com/pt/9-news/264674-137564-food-forest-takes-root-in-lents Grand Opening: East Portland Neighborhood News, Portland Tribune http://www.eastportland.org/sites/default/files/2016-07-EPNAN-finalweb.pdf (see p. 6) http://portlandtribune.com/pt/9-news/323457-202737-lents-grows-a-community-orchard-space
The Association of Slavic Immigrants US 2015 "Slavic Culture Festival": a new radio station, Slavic Family began broadcasting its program at 11:30 am. The station started its program during the time of the festival preparation. There appeared new leading journalists and new radio programs were developed at the station. During the festival the representatives of the radio station came out on the stage and conducted a trivia show, rewarding smart people. The festival helps to identify new young leaders and provides them with an opportunity to try their hands in doing new things and strengthen their friendships. Afisha magazine published stories before and after the event for the Russian-language community. Slavic Culture Festival organizers were also on the Slavic Family Radio station every week for 4 months and for an additional 9 months we were on the radio speaking about the Festival twice a month.
Division Midway Alliance (DMA) worked with Portland Bureau of Transportation (PBOT) to market the 'ribbon cutting' ceremony for the Art on the Box at the SW corner of SE 122nd & Division. KATU, KPTV and EastPdxNews.com attended the event.
CB.5. 2 Develop a marketing campaign about why East Portland is a great place to buy a home.
Add new update

Updates

The Association of Slavic Immigrants US 2015 "Slavic Culture Festival" promoted the theme "Why do we love our East Portland?": Afisha magazine published stories before and after the event for the Russian-language community focusing on the theme to draw people to living in East Portland. Slavic Culture Festival organizers were also on the Slavic Family Radio station every week for 4 months and for an additional 9 months we were on the radio speaking about the Festival's theme twice a month. The Slavic Family radio station, began broadcasting its program at 11:30 am. The station started its program during the time of the festival preparation. There appeared new leading journalists and new radio programs were developed at the station while they focused on the theme to draw people to East Portland .
CB.5. 3 Inventory East Portland's unique assets and create a long-term marketing/media campaign to publicize; include development of website.
Add new update

Updates

Zenger Farm, Audubon Society, Johnson Creek Watershed Council, Environmental Education Assoc. of Oregon, Leach Botanical Garden, and other interested parties who share the area from 116th to 128th and Foster have been meeting quarterly to discuss common ground and programs. One major conversation focuses on how to reframe the geographic node in people's minds with an eye toward positive future investment and image. We've taken to calling this area "Eastern Eden", thinking of the potential for a 'green zone' with 10/10/10 characteristics anchored in the enviro-argicultural-botanical-cultural landscapes.
EPNO has developed eastportland.org to provide information on East Portland. EPAP has a presence on the EPNO website as eastportlandactionplan.org, this includes the development of an Action Plan Updates page were everyone can track their contribution to address of Action items. East Portland Action Plan Economic Development Subcommittee, through EPAP Project funding, produced the East Portland Economic Development Assessment. This document inventories some of East Portland's unique assetts and establishes five strategies as next steps economic development initiatives. The first initiative is to "Market East Portland as a place to do business". The EPAP Economic Development Subcommittee is actively working to advocact for address of the elements established to move this initiative forward. EPAP has actively worked with the East Portland Arts Collective, which is developing an inventory of East Portland's arts and culture assets.
The Association of Slavic Immigrants US 2015 "Slavic Culture Festival" promoted the theme "Why do we love our East Portland?": The Slavic Festival has a year-round website: www.SlavicFestivalPortland.org where the festival is first celebrating the theme before the Festival and after the Festival celebrating East Portland with a slide show as a home to the Festival. Afisha magazine published stories before and after the event for the Russian-language community focusing on the theme to draw people to living in East Portland. In 2015 National Geographic Magazine book recommended the Slavic Festival as a perfect event. Slavic Culture Festival organizers were also on the Slavic Family Radio station every week for 4 months and for an additional 9 months we were on the radio speaking about the Festival's theme twice a month. The Slavic Family radio station, began broadcasting its program at 11:30 am. The station started its program during the time of the festival preparation. There appeared new leading journalists and new radio programs were developed at the station while they focused on the theme to draw people to East Portland .

CB.6 Strengthen and increase participation in neighborhood services

CB.6. 1 Provide annual mailing to all East Portland addresses about role of neighborhood associations and how to become involved.
Add new update

Updates

EPNO outreach mailings are done by the East Portland Neighborhood Association News with a goal of covering the entire area once a year. The newsletter highlights wide range of community advocacy efforts, events, meetings and volunteer activities. East Portland Action Plan developed a brochure with a front page that states: "Pride in East Portland A Great Place to Live and Grow". EPAP funded an East Portland Economic Development Assessment that they made sure acknowledged East Portland attributes. The EPAP website focuses on East Portland attributes, including updates to the Action Plan. One of 5 priority strategies for the EPAP Economic Development Subcommittee is "Market East Portland as a Place to do Business".
The East Portland Neighborhood Office (EPNO) was the municipal project manager for the 2014 East Portland Communication Outreach EPAP Municipal Partnership Project, which EPAP allocated $27,409.08 on Dec 4th, 2013. A 20-page edition of the East Portland Neighborhood Association News (EPNAN) was sent out to all 57,899 East Portland households, as well as over 1,000 businesses, in the week of May 12th, 2014. This edition not only had articles about the "role of neighborhood associations and how to become involved", but also several about seeking transportation and parks input related to a survey insert, in four languages (English, Vietnamese, Russian, & Spanish.) Several articles thanked EPAP directly for funding this edition. There was also a full-color 16 inch by 20 inch map of East Portland in the center-fold.
CB.6. 2 Develop and implement outreach program to residents typically underrepresented in East Portland neighborhood associations: renters, youth, disabled, diverse race and ethnicities, etc.
Add new update

Updates

Bus rider outreach program is designed to reach residents from East Portland's diverse and underrepresented communities, specifically low-income, transit-dependent, youth, elderly, disabled, people of color
The project (Social Adjustment and Integration of Iraqi Population in East Portland) was a real learning process through its successes and challenges, taking into consideration the very young age of the Iraqi organization and the Iraqi community in Portland. It is big step in closing the cultural gap between the mainstream culture and the new comers’ culture, and it is a courageous and far sight by EPAP to fund our project. It is very ambitious to bring psychosocial change in 5-6 workshops, this process will take years but I am confident it is going to succeed since people now are willing to engage in community activities like in the Health Equity campaign, and we started a solidarity fund for the Iraqi community. The project included eight workshops that were held at: East minister Presbyterian Church, East Portland neighborhood office, East Portland Precinct, and East Portland Community Center. The average number of participants was around 20-25, and they were men and women of different ages (17-55y.o). These workshops in were the first opportunity for the Iraqi community in east portland to meet the wider community of elected and governemental officials and residents.
Slavic Community Center held classes that taught how to pass a citizenship class which involved lots of effort from the attendees. Having English as their second language, it was beneficial, as the students had told us themselves, that we had a teacher that was fluent in English and Russian languages. This really gave a boost for the students to be able to learn everything quicker and to be able to retain information. During the class we also taught the importance of voting once they become citizens, also we explained the importance of selective services and most of all we encouraged them to be involved in the community projects and provide their useful cultural knowledge to enrich other people of Portland with their uniqueness and creativity. As the classes were coming to an end, students started begging us to not finish these classes with this, but to continue on next year. We had success stories right away since few of our students had to go and take citizenship test during the time that our classes were still going on. They passed the test and came back to class and encouraged other students that these classes helped them to pass since they did not pass before.
EPAP grant (2011) funded AmeriCorps Community Organizer helped establish outreach work in the Rosewood area. A majority of the residents in the immediate community are underrepresented, coming from diverse ethnic backgrounds, age, and income and education levels. Through listening and engaging many residents, neighborhood association participants have a deeper understanding of the north section of Centennial Community Association. CCA events and gatherings are now promoted through and supported by the Rosewood network. The organizer worked with The Rosewood Initiative to begin holding gatherings with community members and partners in a new community space at SE 162nd Ave and Stark. Community members from traditionally underrepresented populations are now engaged in building Rosewood Cafe as a community center and hub for neighborhood transformation. They are also engaged in ongoing community building activities and improvement projects throughout the neighborhood. This continues to enable CCA to build relationships with more neighbors and partners in business, government, faith organizations, nonprofit, social service, and more.
Positive stories and activities are promoted through the East Portland Neighborhood Association News, a quarterly newsletter that is mailed to 7000 East Portland addresses. East Portland Action Plan submits positive media stories to every issure of the East Portland News and coordinates representatives to speak with media on a regular basis. East Portland Action Plan developed a brochure with a front page that states: "Pride in East Portland A Great Place to Live and Grow". EPAP funded an East Portland Economic Development Assessment that they made sure acknowledged East Portland attributes. The EPAP website focuses on East Portland attributes, including updates to the Action Plan. One of 5 priority strategies for the EPAP Economic Development Subcommittee is "Market East Portland as a Place to do Business".
ONI Diversity and Civic Leadership program funds five community of color, immigrant, refugee organizations to provide civic engagement, leadership and cacacity building resources for their organizations. Those groups are increasingly engaged in targeted outer East outreach efforts. East Portland Action Plan has funded and EPNO staff has supported work being done to coordinate and expand the PP&R summer youth activities, which has engaged leadership from East Portland Action Plan Civic Engagement language and cultural-specific communities and neighborhood associations. East Portland Action Plan has a Civic Engagement Subcommittee that is representative of diverse race and ethnic groups. This group establishes criteria and application development for the East Portland Civic Engagement Grant program. The East Portland Action Plan has actively sought and involved representation from renters, youth, disabled, diverse race and ethnicities, and LGBTQ communities
LLC Latino Learning Community explico la importancia de estar informados, Los asistentes hicieron bastantes comentarios y preguntas referentes al tema, mostrando interes al respecto, y ademas agradeciendo la oportunidad de tener estas charlas en la propia escuela en la que asisten sus ninos.
LLC Latino Learning Comunity quien trabaja en union con East Portland,contacto a NortWest Family Services, una organizacion encargada de dar las clases. Y asi trabajamos enn conjunto Claudia Carrillo se encargo de los permisos pertinentes con la Principal de la Escuela Primaria Shaver, para invitar alas familias y asi involucrar a los padres de nuestra area de East Portland.
Portland Fruit Tree Project held our East Portland Tree Scouting day July 26, 2014. We held the event at the East Portland Neighborhood office. While it was not as well-attended as we would have liked, the participants enjoyed the event and it was still a success because we spread the word about our programs, especially the Harvest Program, in East Portland and registered more fruit trees. Together participants covered 43.5 blocks and found 40 fruit trees on 28 different sites. During the grant period, we registered 23 new fruit trees in East Portland, increasing the number of trees registered in East Portland by six percent. We now have 412 trees registered in East Portland, and hope to coordinate increasingly more East Portland harvests as a result. Partly as a result of this outreach, Portland Fruit Tree Project volunteers harvested 2,345.5 pounds of fruit in East Portland in 2014, and distributed 2,002 pounds to East Portlanders in need through food pantries and Group Harvests. And we coordinated eight Group Harvests with other organizations serving East Portland residents in need, and two additional harvesting events outside East Portland limits, with East Portland residents.
Portland Fruit Tree Project created a partnership with Parkrose High SUN School to coordinate a Group Harvest with a student group in 2014. These students took home 302.5 pounds of fresh fruit to their schoolmates and families.
Portland Fruit Tree Project held information tables at 19 community events and resource fairs in East Portland from July 1, 2014 through June 30, 2015, reaching approximately 570 individuals and families. Our goal was to engage our target populations (low-income families and/or Hispanics/Latinos) in harvesting events and other community-serving programs. We provided materials translated into Spanish. We also began a website translation project to make our services more accessible to Spanish-speakers.
Outgrowing Hunger's 2014 EPAP General Grant was used in part to hire and train HS and college youth from various refugee communities to conduct outreach for our community garden programming to the non-English speaking, and often pre-literate adult and senior populations in their communities. This strategy was pursued in order to increase the ability of young people to connect and organize their communities, while providing culturally-appropriate in-language communication with a marginalized and under-served population. This same network of outreach interns have also facilitated involvement in civic engagement and advocacy training initiatives in 2015.
Portland Fruit Tree Project conducted 10 community harvest events in east Portland. Roughly 64% of the participants in these harvest self-identified as low-income. We worked with JOIN, Parkrose Sun School, Portland Kitchen and other partners to recruit attendees. Three of these harvesting events were considered “group harvests,” meaning that they were not open to the public but just to those individuals associated with an organization. These groups were Parkrose SUN School and Portland Kitchen. We harvested 1534 pounds of fruit from 12 sites during these events. An estimated 298 households received fruit picked through PFTP’s events. We conducted outreach at 14 community events and resource fairs in east Portland. In addition we made presentations at the Villa Garden Club and Parkrose Sun School.
Free Arts NW has developed a strong working relationship with Powellhurst-Gilbert Neighborhood Association. As a result of this relationship, increased inclusive opportunities have arisen for residents of PGNA and of greater East Portland to engage in arts programming and public art creations.
The Iraqi Society of Oregon EPAP funded project engaged the Iraqi women who are usually isolated and suffer of lack of ability to contribute to the family income.
CB.6. 3 Create an advocate position to seek funding for livability improvements, neighborhood associations and groups.
Add new update

Updates

Lore Wintergreen has been the East Portland Action Plan staff Advocate since 2009. Through her efforts, the community has received from the City over $150,000 annually for community small grants and projects, as well as $130,000 for funding her position and operating funds for the EPAP. Richard Bixby has been running the East Portland Neighborhood Office on an even smaller shoestring budget, for the past several years.
Established EPAP Advocate position to coordinate community participation in EPAP advocacy efforts. EPNO has several community organizing staff working with neighborhood and other community stakeholders utilizing Neighborhood Small Grants and other funding sources when possible. East Portland Action Plan works to build the capacity of involved Neighborhood Association members, uses the EPAP grants programs to recruit for and build partnerships with the Neighborhood Associations, and provides process and advocacy support regularly to Neighborhood Associations upon request.

CB.7 Enhance East Portland's sense of community through historic resource identification and preservation efforts

CB.7. 1 Gather information regarding historical resources and determine focus areas for additional research and potential historic preservation efforts.
Add new update

Updates

The City of Portland received a small grant from the State Historic Preservaion Office to conduct a survey of "mid-century" residential areas developed in the 19040's - 1960's. The survey is complete and Bureau of Planning and Sustainability staff will provide a briefing to the Landmarks Commission on November 22nd 2010 at 3:15pm. The surveywork will enhance our understanding of the building history in Portland's eastside neighborhoods. Information and photos from the survey will be entered into a state database and will be available to the public for mapping, planning, and neighborhood character illustration. For more information contact Liza Mickle at Liza.Mickle@portlandoregon.gov.
Leach Botanical Garden possesses a substantial collection of physical objects, images, documents, and other ephemera from the historic collection of John and Lilla Leach. Much of this is from or referential to the developments in Lents, East Portland and outer Southeast. In acknowledgement of our 30th anniversary as a public garden, we are exploring creation of a video production rooted in the Leach story, including their expeditions of plant discovery around the Pacific NW.
to go along with my update from 11/15/2010, here is a link to the document that was produced for the study: http://www.portlandonline.com/portlandplan/index.cfm?a=346260&c=51427
CB.7. 2 Initiate oral history project for East Portland - integrate results into broader historic resources work.
Add new update

Updates

Powellhurst-Gilbert Neighborhood Association has established a Historian. East Portland Action Plan has assisted the David Douglas School District historian and provided historical documentation materials from the Senn's Dairy Park to the Parkrose Neighborhood Association. East Portland Action Plan is consulting with Portland State University Masters of Urban Planning Students to organize an oral history project focused on one of the East Portland Neighborhood Properity Initiative areas. East Portland Action Plan grant funded Gateway Green to develop an oral history project video for the Gateway area.
Our volunteer curator/historian has conducted and continues to conduct oral history interviews with people who knew John and Lilla Leach as well as who know about the area around the Garden or in Lents where John Leach had his pharmacy from the 20s to the 70s. She also curates our substantial collection of images, letters, clippings, ephemera and artifacts which belonged to the Leachs. We have a formal lending relationship with Oregon Historical Society and display historic artifacts from the Leach Collection at OHS and from U of O.
The Association of Slavic Immigrants US 2015 "Slavic Culture Festival" worked with "Young Journalists" who were local high school students guided by 3 adults who work with Slavic Family magazine and Afisha radio. Over a 4-month period the youth interviewed Russian-language business owners, transport drivers, health care and social workers, apartment complex residents, mothers of large families, and teachers of their schools. The materials were published by Afisha magazine and Our Family newspaper.